Trade in your item
Get a $3.68
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Culture of National Security: Norms and Identity in World Politics (New Directions in World Politics) Hardcover – September 1, 1996


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.75

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: New Directions in World Politics
  • Hardcover: 562 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231104685
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231104685
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,431,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A pioneering work, the first to try to marry constructivist approaches to security studies. . . . I would be surprised if this book doesn't become part of a new canon in international relations theory. -- Ted Hopf University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

No future discussion in international relations theory can ignore the contributions of this approach and no serious theoretical study will be complete without numerous citations to this edited volume. -- Choice

Review

A pioneering work, the first to try to marry constructivist approaches to security studies.... I would be surprised if this book doesn't become part of a new canon in international relations theory.

(Ted Hopf, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daria I. Novak on August 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
I am assigning this book as required reading in my Culture and National Security class. Every page has something of value. It should be read cover-to-cover by undergrad, grad students and professors. If our policy makers in Washington absorbed the information contained in this volume they would have a much better understanding of why our policy goals often fail in other parts of the world. Katzenstein fulfills a critical need by helping us to better understand the impact of culture on national security. The book will make both academicians and policy makers stop, think and re-evaluate how they analyze the world today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Robert David STEELE Vivas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 19, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I confess to some impatience with this book, published in 1996. It is very much state-centric, although to its credit in the conclusion it postulates a need to focus more on non-military resources and objectives, and on non-state actors.

The book opens with the statement that the key to understanding is to focus on how people view their interests and how that changes, but I searched in vain for any differentiation among the eight tribes that define my own study of international and internal relations: government, military, law enforcement, academia, business, media, non-governmental and non-profit (and in the US, especially, foundations), and finally, civil including religion, labor, and advocacy groups. This book may well be one of the last gasps of "state uber alles" literature.

I have a note, bridge between the European literature of the 1980's and the new view emerging in the post 9-11 environment, where most of us now recognize that security in all its forms, including human, food, and water security, are easily as important and often more important than military security.

The editors themselves recognize that all the theories were wrong, and that academia slept through the revolution, failing to foresee or explain.

I am amused by the discussion of identity, and how this presents the academics--poor dears--with moral issues.

I love footnotes, and this book has many of them, but as I went on and on I felt two things: 1) holy cow, the best of the best talking to themselves; and 2) where is everything else? This book strives to examine the fault line between Kennedy's focus on resources and Fukiyama's focus on ideology, while missing the impact of technology on the rise of indigenous peoples.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By K. McCarty on February 21, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My professor chose this book for our Democracy & National Security class. First, I am not a poly-sci major or public policy major so take my words as you wish. This book is dedicated to "the graduate students at Cornell"! By not for the casual ... reader, I mean that unless you know a considerable about world political history (WWII-Early 90s) you will probably not understand what the author(s) are talking about. Many examples given to enhance comprehension involve past international relations action so surely if you don't know that either the example won't help you much.

Please note my review is not to attack the author or the book, it seems like it would be interesting if: 1) I was interested in international relations/foreign policy and 2) If I possessed a working knowledge of previous political incidents (major and minor). You can believe I will be selling this book back, nearly in mint condition; I will have no use for it.

Hope that helped, but if it didn't, "sorry for wasting your time."

Kevin
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?