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The Cure Paperback – May 8, 2006

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About the Author

ANTHONY MARAIS was born in Hollywood in 1966. He studied anthropology at U.C. Berkeley and archaeology at Simon Fraser University in Canada. His writing focuses on culture and its ability to elevate people beyond their natural condition. He is author of The Xenophobe's Guide to the Californians (Oval Books, London). The Cure is his first novel.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Balneum Books (May 8, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097747920X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977479207
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,426,441 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I was born in Hollywood and raised in Southern California. I studied anthropology at U.C. Berkeley and archaeology at Simon Fraser University in Canada.

I've traveled throughout Polynesia and Europe, and since 1995 have been living in Wiesbaden, Germany.

I've been avidly watching movies ever since I saw Woody Allen's 'Sleeper' at the cinema at the age of seven.

In 1985, with Bryan Foy I co-founded 'The Squids' an Orange County pop-group which was heard on L.A.'s most popular radio stations.

I lived in Paris for two years next to Notre Dame, near the Marais quarter. During this time I saw Jean Marais perform on stage and discovered the music of Marin Marais.

I attended my first archaeological field school at an historic Russian fort (Fort Ross) in Sonoma, California. It was here that I decided to become an archaeologist.

While at Berkeley, I lived in The Carlton Hotel on the corner of Telegraph and Durant. During this time I became a devotee of the clown/activist Stoney Burke.

In 1991, while living on Guam, I played bass guitar for the Chamorro singer/songwriter Maria Yatar. As payment for my services I was given a traditional Micronesian tattoo applied by hand which took ten hours (I won't tell you where).

I've worked as an archaeologist on the islands of Tahiti, Mo'orea, Guam, Puluwat, Truk, Ponape, Tonga, Oahu, and Fiji. The time spent on these islands was pivotal in the development of my attitude toward writing.

In 1995, I became a member of the Academy of Magical Arts ('The Magic Castle') in Hollywood. I also read The Magic Mountain, decided to write a novel and met writer Richard A. Lord in Frankfurt.

In 2002, I met Polish film director Jarek Marszewski and since this time have been collaborating with him on his forthcoming film 'Plateau.'

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Nora Caron on February 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Marais' deeply witty, intelligent, philosophical novel The Cure is not made for readers who have a sensitive stomach; although it begins with a light, humorous series of mini adventures, it ends with a plunge into the deep black sea: the search for truth is not an easy search, Marais seems to be underlining. What Robert Holsen, the protagonist, is searching for ultimately mirrors what we are all searching for: meaning to our petty, routine existences.

Robert finds himself in a little village in Germany, feeding on his desire to discover new frontiers; little does he know what he is getting into when he begins to drink the famous Wiesbaden waters. As his thirst for this water grows, it seems his thirst for the Unknown grows too; yet as Carlos Castaneda would say, the Unknown only leads to madness, thus people should stick to their side of the world to remain sane.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Marais' novel; having never read him before, one should know that Marais' archeological past creeps up in many eloquent descriptive passages. He often describes with clear and vivid words the world around him, and brings into this world a very pleasing and aesthetic quality. His characters are other worldly, often causing us to laugh hysterically or swallow with difficulty. For those searching for the Fountain of Youth, perhaps Marais' philosophies are the portal to a new understanding of the term "Everlasting life".
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By book.of.the.moment on January 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
"The Cure," entertains the ageless question "why am I here, and what is my purpose?" A question many ask themselves, and very few are ever able to answer. The story is one of self discovery..of fleeing your everyday world for someplace new, in an attempt to put your own life into some sort of perspective.

The plot is simple: Robert, the main character, is disappointed in what his university filled life has to offer him, so he leaves. Cutting all ties with those people and things who no longer bring any sort of fulfillment, he finds himself in a spa town in Germany. From here we follow Robert on his somewhat painful, often mysterious voyage towards self discovery.

Anthony Marais has produced a brilliant novel here..its something anyone can relate to. The characters are entertaining and have witty dialogues, and Marais has intelligent views on life and human nature.

I'm not sure what else to write here..I don't want to tell all about the story, as it really is one that everyone needs to read and appreciate for themselves. If you know anything about personal journeys, or just want to read about one, this is your book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. F. Salazar on December 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
I stumbled upon Anthony Marais' book while I was walking around in a town called Wiesbaden, in Germany. I read the last page first, as is my custom, flipped through it a little bit, and decided to buy it. I'm glad I did. I found the book to be thoroughly enjoyable, and completely entertaining. I appreciated the author's toungue-in-cheek sense of humor, his insights into human nature, and his interpretation of life. I recommend this book to anyone who knows about personal journeys into oneself, or to anyone who wants to read about one.

I have, since reading the book, handed my copy to friends for them to read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Teresa Ebner on August 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
In his debut novel, Anthony Marais - author of "The Xenophobe's Guide to the Californians" - follows the story of an American (Robert) who is disappointed in how little university and science can offer, and sets out for Germany in his search for meaning in life. He settles down in Wiesbaden, a picturesque spa near the Rhine.

It is easy to identify with Robert, a young adult who is lost in the world. Steadily he explores his new environment, and the reader witnesses how he makes friends and finds his way around. He gets to know Petra and Jürgen who both share his critical view on things. Jürgen also takes Robert to "Käfer's," a rather exotic bar where he is introduced to Herr Eberhard: an extrovert of profound knowledge and wisdom, who is able to hold Robert under his spell when discussing the healing effect of Wiesbaden's natural springs and also explores all kinds of interesting views and theories about philosophical matters.

It becomes clear that Robert is on an internal journey guided by the fatherly figure Herr Eberhard. In the fourth part "Rubedo" (red/rebirth--the last phase of an alchemical transformation) Robert finally achieves self-knowledge and peace in his soul. However, it remains subject to the reader which of the events in the end actually happened "in reality" or in Robert's mind.

Marais' style is straightforward and picture-evoking, "It was a morning the working world would never know: an unearthly atmosphere created by the absence of people", is one of my favourite lines. After having read the book I feel like I know Wiesbaden, with its handsome streets and different fountains. Moreover, the book is a gentle reminder that in a world full of options and possibilities we should listen to our heart more often when making a decision - like Robert. A wonderful and inspirational novel!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kaolin Fire on July 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
Marais' "The Cure" is an elegantly erudite novel with compelling prose. It recounts a man's mental journey, far from home; Robert has distanced himself from California and unusual academic troubles. Seeking the cure to his life so far, he has moved to Kochbrunnen, Wiesbaden, Germany, long known for its curative waters--which at first he just dabbles with. Slowly, though, the waters become the driving force of his existence.

Marais begins the novel with Robert waking from a tortured and confused dream, about which the reader is given much detail, though it's difficult to piece together. It comes across as a real dream, in that there are elements of truth but not everything is as it appears, or even relevant. The narrative slips from the dream into introducing us to Robert's existence; and we follow Robert around town for most of the rest of the book.

His life is both patterned and chaotic, having few constraints on it. Robert walks the town, sits in cafes, and talks with friends, occasionally making new ones. Amidst this, there is the water--and transformation. He's induced to wonder about the reality of everything, and begins to consider as possible things far from the norm. While this could be a very juvenile story, Anthony Marais has put a lot of thought and polish into the introspection and the interactions, and even when not novel they ring true, and human.

As we approach the inevitable conclusion, we're dropped, one by one, into the heads of his friends and acquaintances--to separate us from the reality of his dream and, I think, to draw out the suspense of things. The answer at the end--or rather the perhaps necessary lack of one--left me somewhat disappointed: I'd followed the quest faithfully and wanted some other truth than what we're given.
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