Start reading The Curiosities of Food on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

The Curiosities of Food: Or the Dainties and Delicacies of Different Nations Obtained from the Animal Kin gdom [Kindle Edition]

Peter Lund Simmonds , P.L. Simmonds , Alan Davidson
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $10.99
Sold by: Random House LLC

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $10.99  
Hardcover, Facsimile --  
Unknown Binding --  
Kindle Delivers
Kindle Delivers
Subscribe to the Kindle Delivers monthly e-mail to find out about each month's Kindle book deals, new releases, editors' picks and more. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Book Description

Originally published in London in 1859, this rare treasure of culinary history was recently brought to light in the award-winning Oxford Companion to Food, whose author, Alan Davidson, used it as a primary reference in researching some of the more obscure foodstuffs consumed across the globe. Davidson writes that "[CURIOSITIES] is in all probability the first attempt to write a general worldwide survey of animal products." Long out of print and scarce even in the antiquarian market, this lost classic of wit, erudition, and grand storytelling is now made available in a facsimile edition, with an introduction by Davidson. As Simmonds reveals in his charming culinary travelogue, just about everything that walks, swims, crawls, slithers, or flies has been eaten at one time or another, and the eminent Victorian scholar has the tasting notes. On lizards: "In Guatemala, there is a popular belief, that lizards eaten alive cure cancer. . . . The man who first eat a live oyster or clam, was certainly a venturous fellow, but the eccentric individual who allowed a live lizard to run down his throat was infinitely more so." • One of the most important works of culinary history from the nineteenth century, and a significant primary source for Alan Davidson's award-winning Oxford Companion to Food.


From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Boredom will most likely not be on the menu while you are perusing CURIOSITIES OF FOOD." —Houston Chronicle"A joy to read or dip into, you will never open the covers without being astounded. . . A splendid cookbook for those with unusual tastes." —Fortean Times"The stuff of travel writers' dreams and readers' nightmares."—The London Sunday Times"My favourite book of the year, Peter Lund Simmonds' THE CURIOSITIES OF FOOD, a wonderfully learned and witty disquisition on the subject of the various creatures eaten by man, first published in 1859 and still remarkably fresh." —The Financial Times"Entertaining, highly readable facsimile edition." —Times Literary's"A-" rating. It's a "mesmerizingly meticulous survey of all things edible in the animal kingdom" that "offers readers insight into its era" and has an "endearingly earnest narrator." —Entertainment Weekly"Nearly 400 pages of most unusual food and travel writing . . . THE CURIOSITIES OF FOOD charts the dizzying breadth of world foodstuffs. This facsimile edition probably won't tantalize your taste buds, but nearly a century and a half after it was first published, it's enthralling for anyone interested in food." —The Food Network"In recent years, we've seen a string of books on insects and other presumably disgusting foods. THE CURIOSITIES OF FOOD . . . may have been the first of them. . . . When Simmonds describes the land crab hunts of the Caribbean and South American trade in monkey flesh, they were not something distant and theoretical—they were the vigorous, lurid reality of the time." —Charles Perry, Los Angeles Times"Simmonds' mesmerizingly meticulous survey of all things edible in the animal kingdom was first published in England in 1859. What's basically an encyclopedia of consumable creatures . . . has an endearingly earnest narrator; he seems quite tickled. . . about sharing palatable pleasures like salted hippo (tastes like bacon!) or cooked badger (tastes like boar!). But beyond its listing of beasts to be baked, the book offers readers intense insight into its era." —Entertainment Weekly

From the Publisher

Entertainment Weekly, August 24, 2001-

Simmonds' mesmerizingly meticulous survey of all things edible in the animal kingdom was first published in England in 1859. What's basically an encyclopedia of consumable creatures-organized in categories from Cetacea (i.e., walrus) to Grallatores (i.e., ostrich)-has an endearingly earnest narrator; he seems quite tickled, in a crusty 19th-century British way, about sharing palatable pleasures like salted hippo (tastes like bacon!) or cooked badger (tastes like boar!). But beyond its listing of beasts to be baked, the book offers readers intense insight into its era. Lepers fondle slabs of steak in open-air meat markets, slaves scramble to catch rats in the West Indies. And elephant paws, kargaroo hash, puppy stew, and young bear cub are all on the menu during a period of environmental flippancy that would make even a Bush blush.


Product Details

  • File Size: 1709 KB
  • Print Length: 398 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1580082971
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press; Facsimile edition (January 23, 2013)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00AXIZ6AI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,403,889 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
(3)
4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-deserved resurrection. April 18, 2002
Format:Hardcover
This small book does not pretend to be an original work, rather a compilation of accounts and stories from many sources. Written in 1859, it necessarily has that elaborate Victorian style, but is more readable than many others of the same period - which may not be to everyone's taste, but I for one found it utterly charming.
There is a wealth of detail contained here, with some mind-boggling and stomach-turning anecdotes, but one should have a good dictionary ready to hand for those common Victorian words which are obscure (not to say obsolete) nowadays:- calapash & calapee (upper and lower turtle meat); lymph (pure, clear water); maw (stomach); quintal (hundredweight); train-oil (whale-oil); rypeu (ptarmigan); phlebotomized (bled).
A subtle (but sometimes hilarious) undercurrent of humour pervades the whole book; e.g. re gelatine, "The Americans ... tried to pass off upon us isinglass made of fish bones, but it would not go down" and "the only difference between this and joiner's glue is its greater price". It is apparent that the author takes a vicarious pleasure in rooting out the more extreme and gut-wrenching descriptions of cuisine and customs from writings by various travellers in remote lands.
Overall, this is a witty, engaging collection of unusual (probably useless, but great for quizzes!) trivia that well-deserves this long-overdue resurrection.
If only Mr. Simmonds had lived long enough to complete the companion book of vegetable food curiosities...
Gets my 5 stars.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Strangely Interesting October 23, 2001
Format:Hardcover
First off this book was written in 1859. Once again 1859, not 1959 or anything remotely close to us. This book is about eating different types of animals. How to eat flying lemurs, horses, and so much more. If taken from a historical perspective this can be interesting. Honestly I found this book a bit difficult to read, as they were talking about eating many endangered animals.
The printface remains from its original publishing, so you will not mistake this for a book that was written recently. The book has no illustrations, but is in text only. It is a bit interesting from an acedemic point of view.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Originally appeared in London in 1859 February 7, 2002
Format:Hardcover
Curiosities Of Food survey of delicacies of different nations originally appeared in London in 1859 and here charts some obscure and notable foods from around the world for new audiences. It's long been out of print, so modern cooks and food fans will delight in Peter Simmonds' blend of travelogue and observation.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category