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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Hardcover – August 1, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-1594742811 ISBN-10: 1594742812

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Quirk Books (August 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594742812
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594742811
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.7 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (166 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #812,064 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The impending release of a movie version starring Brad Pitt has made this humorous tale, formerly among the least known of Fitzgerald's short stories, a hot property. DeFillippis and Weir's adaptation preserves the original's straight-faced tone describing the career of a man who begins life in his 70s and grows progressively younger. If bystanders find this more than curious, they usually are just irritated at Benjamin for not behaving like other people. He himself is surprised as his body morphs, but is always open to new possibilities; his good-natured adaptability gives the social satire a gentle edge. Readers should, of course, look up Fitzgerald's original, but there's much to enjoy in this handsome little hardbound book. Cornell's sepia watercolor panels are especially clever at showing physical and emotional changes as Benjamin moves backward through life while America rolls forward for 70 years. A useful, gracefully written afterword by Donald G. Sheehy, professor of English, completes the volume nicely. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Grade 10 Up—In antebellum Maryland, the Button family is gifted with a wizened newborn whose physical age seems to grow ever younger over time. The scholarly afterword to this meticulous volume mentions the recent film adaptation of Fitzgerald's Jazz Age story, but it would be a mistake to assume that this volume has been created simply because of the media tie-in. It is a strikingly literal adaptation, re-creating dialogue, narration, and even chapter breaks with an assured and deliberate hand. While Fitzgerald's light tone is well preserved, it is the artwork that is the most striking, despite what could be construed as a dour use of gray and sepia. It is highly evocative, with an excellent use of facial expression to moving and comic effect. As the story obviously must address the particulars of physical age, Cornell depicts not just the transformation of Benjamin's face, but also his changing poise and confidence with well-rendered body language. While a thoroughly fine work, the lightly funny, softly satiric material will not produce peals of laughter, and the subject matter may strike teens as more unusual than engaging. Still, this is a work of quality that should find a small but appreciative audience.—Benjamin Russell, Belmont High School, NH
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

It isn't too often that a story really gets you thinking and draws you in like this one does.
Amazon Customer
It's an unusually whimsical idea for the legendary F. Scott Fitzgerald, but this short story explores it very well, with poignancy and a measure of humor.
E. A Solinas
Not only is he born full-grown, he has also been born with the ability to speak and a taste for expensive cigars.
M. Hooper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on October 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am not a huge fan of short stories, because it never fails that by the time I find myself invested in them I have reached the last page. Same can be said for `The Curious Case of Benjamin Button', a rather delightful little story that is engaging, interesting and very rewarding. Yes, this is a short story, so I'm going to say this straight off; you may not want to invest your money in this version. I actually purchased another version from Amazon that has a few short stories for less money, so try you hand at that collection instead of this singular novel.

But, I wanted to take the time to review the story, because that's what these reviews are all about right, the work itself and not the packaging.

`The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' is a peculiar tale of a man born at the end of his life and has the rare opportunity of growing young, living his life in reverse as it were. F. Scott Fitzgerald states at the beginning of this story that it was inspired by a statement made by Mark Twain, that the best things in life happen at the beginning and the worst at the end. With `The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' Fitzgerald plays the cynic, exploring how living life in reverse can be seemingly beneficial yet ultimately devastating.

Benjamin is born a brittle old man with a cane (not literally, but he needs one) and a full mind, and as the year's progress his relationships with those around him shift for various reasons. First he is at odds with his devastated parents who are ashamed of him, but as he grows to meet his father in age they become like brothers. He meets and falls in love with the young Hildegarde, who is attracted to the `older' Benjamin, only to marry her, grow younger than her, and drift apart from her.
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Stephen L. Powell on October 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Tales of the Jazz Age (Penguin Classics Hardcover) does not contain the original contents of the 1922 book of the same title. This edition contains the following eight stories.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Head and Shoulders
The Cut-Glass Bowl
The Four Fists
May Day
'O Russet Witch!'
Bernice Bobs Her Hair
The Lees of Happiness

Of these stories five are also included in Flappers and Philosophers: The Collected Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald (Penguin Classics Hardcover). If you're buying these books as a book collector (like me) you'll want both titles because they are gorgeous editions. If however you're not intending on buying both I suggest purchasing Flappers and Philosophers instead as it has the majority of these stories plus many more.

[...]
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on July 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
Tales Of The Jazz Age is an anthology of classic short stories by the renowned 20th Century American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who is best known for his enduring classic "The Great Gatsby". Satirizing the selfishness of the wealthy, depicting revelry that escalates into a destructive mob, while offering a sharp look at the flaws of society, and enhanced with introductions to each story by the author, Tales Of The Jazz Age is highly recommended, and this Pine Street Books edition would make a perfect choice for school and community libraries needing to replace worn copies of previous editions.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. A. I. on September 26, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Avoid the Timeless Classics edition. It is a mess. Far from being "carefully formatted" it is in fact full of typos and odd formatting choices that distract and detract from the enjoyment of Fitzgerald's stories. If you wish to save money just download the free version which is certainly no worse than the awful Timeless Classic edition.

If you want a better file try one of the more expensive editions.

If anyone at the "publisher" (or at Amazon) cares I would appreciate a refund on this ebook or a free download of a better edition.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on November 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Tales of the Jazz Age is an anthology of nineteen short stories by renowned author F. Scott Fitzgerald, including "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz", "Dice, Brassknuckles and Guitar", and "Love in the Night". Enhanced with an extensive record of variants, explanatory notes, as well as an extensive introduction concerning the selection and editorial principles of the anthology, Tales of the Jazz Age is a superb edition of classic literature that would grace any academic or library collection -- and is "must" reading for F. Scott Fitzgerald enthusiasts and fans.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Ellington VINE VOICE on October 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am not a huge fan of short stories, because it never fails that by the time I find myself invested in them I have reached the last page. Same can be said for `The Curious Case of Benjamin Button', a rather delightful little story that is engaging, interesting and very rewarding. Yes, this is a short story, so I'm going to say this straight off; you may not want to invest your money in this version. I actually purchased another version from Amazon that has a few short stories for less money, so try you hand at that collection instead of this singular novel.

But, I wanted to take the time to review the story, because that's what these reviews are all about right, the work itself and not the packaging.

`The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' is a peculiar tale of a man born at the end of his life and has the rare opportunity of growing young, living his life in reverse as it were. F. Scott Fitzgerald states at the beginning of this story that it was inspired by a statement made by Mark Twain, that the best things in life happen at the beginning and the worst at the end. With `The Curious Case of Benjamin Button' Fitzgerald plays the cynic, exploring how living life in reverse can be seemingly beneficial yet ultimately devastating.

Benjamin is born a brittle old man with a cane (not literally, but he needs one) and a full mind, and as the year's progress his relationships with those around him shift for various reasons. First he is at odds with his devastated parents who are ashamed of him, but as he grows to meet his father in age they become like brothers. He meets and falls in love with the young Hildegarde, who is attracted to the `older' Benjamin, only to marry her, grow younger than her, and drift apart from her.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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