Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $4.35 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by erltprl2
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Hardcover in DJ. Binding tight and square. Pages clean and free of writing or marks. Well packed and promptly shipped.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Czechoslovak Cookbook: Czechoslovakia's best-selling cookbook adapted for American kitchens. Includes recipes for authentic dishes like Goulash, ... Torte. (Crown Classic Cookbook Series) Hardcover – April 13, 1965


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.60
$8.11 $0.34


Frequently Bought Together

The Czechoslovak Cookbook: Czechoslovakia's best-selling cookbook adapted for American kitchens.  Includes recipes for authentic dishes like Goulash, ... Torte. (Crown Classic Cookbook Series) + Cherished Czech Recipes + Czech & Slovak Kolache Recipes & Sweet Treats
Price for all three: $28.60

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New and Popular Cookbooks for Fall
Get inspired with new and popular cookbooks and other food-related titles in Fall into Cooking.

Product Details

  • Series: Crown Classic Cookbook Series
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Clarkson Potter; Revised edition (April 13, 1965)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517505479
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517505472
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #214,404 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Joza Brizova

In Czechoslovakia, a country known for fine cooks, a copy of Varime Zdrave Chutne a Hospodarne graces nearly every kitchen. Now this best-selling Czechoslovak cookbook has been adapted for American use. The Czechoslovak Cookbook contains over 500 authentic recipes that convey the essence of Czechoslovak cuisine.

Hearty soups made from modest ingredients are one of the hallmarks of Czechoslovak cuisine. Contained in this volume are recipes for such favorites as Garlic Soup, Creamed Fish Soup, and Rye Bread Soup. Robust meat dishes include Ginger Roast Beef, Braised Beef with Vegetables and Sour Cream, Beef Goulash, Tartar Beefsteak, Mutton with Marjoram, Veal Cutlets with Mushrooms, Stuffed Breast of Veal, Veal Paprika, Roast Pork with Capers, Braised Sweetbreads, and a variety of pates.

The poultry and game chapter contains recipes for Chicken Paprika, Roast Capon, Roast Goose. Stuffed Roast Squab, Roast Hare with Sour Cream, and Leg of Venison with Red Wine.

The Czechs are particularly fond of meals centered around egg dishes and dumplings, for instance Baked Eggs with Chicken Livers, Farina Omelet, Noodle Souffle with Cherries and Nuts, Noodles with Farmer Cheese, Napkin Dumplings, Dumplings with Smoked Meat, and Sour Cream Pancakes. Rounded out with a vegetable dish like Sauteed Cabbage, Green Beans Paprika, or Stuffed Kale Rolls, these entrees make a tasty and inexpensive dinner.

The Czechs are justifiably famous for their baking, and The Czechoslovak Cookbook is full of delectable baked goods: Bohemian Biscuits. Crisp Potato Sticks, Salt Rolls, Pretzels, Christmas Twist, Checkerboard Cookies, Bishop's Bread, and Honey Cake.

Suitable for both the experienced cook and the novice who hasn't ventured beyond broiling a steak, The Czechoslovak Cookbook is a valuable asset to any kitchen.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Easy to follow, love it!
Paul F. Smith
Love my history so I need to have dishes from my families past to remember how good they were when I was young.
Daniel Houska
This book was given to me many years ago so I bought one for my culinary daughter.
horkazena

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
These are the recipies that were usually not written down, at least in english, in my husband's family, because they were handed down from mother to daughter. Everything from the traditional knedlicky (dumplings) and pork roast, to the various Christmas cookies is in here. My copy is so spattered, I'm buying a new copy to save for the next generation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Gina Kruml on September 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As a Czech I can say that this book is good, if somewhat misleading. There are a great many recipes in the book that most Czechs have probably never heard of, and if they have, have never themselves had. As with people in most of the countries in Europe, Czechs have their tried and true favorites which they cook, by American standards, very frequently. If one only knew as a non-Czech what these best hits were they would not be dissatisfied with this book. However there is much room to go astray. Nevertheless I find some of the recipes in this book to be very good and have had the occasion to cook them for other czechs who enthusiastically agreed with me. The Time-Life book that covers the cooking of Austria, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia is an excellent book with fewer disappointments for the non-native person. But, if you like to experiment, you will eventually stumble upon some very good recipes with this book as well.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Polkadotty on December 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The original Brizova publication features simple, solid cooking and uses ingredients most kitchens readily have on hand. I haven't seen anything out of the ordinary in the cookbook, save to say if you don't like tongue and tripe and liver and heart, then simply take a pass at the recipes that use it.

The real trick to honest Czech cooking is to make a tasty dish out of a few simple ingredients and to prepare it well. As in America, Czechs cook to their own taste (thus the arguments regarding spices) creating personalized specialties from standbys such as dumplings, strudel, kolache and breads, fixing it to suit the tastes of those they cook for.

Certain foods are a staple ~ dumplings, potatoes, rye bread; root vegetables such rutabaga, parsnips, celery root, turnips. Kale, cabbage, cauliflower, and celery are also frequently used. Horseradish and vinegar are common condiments, often sweetened to taste with a little sugar. Czechs aren't afraid of butter, lard, chicken fat, goose greese, sausage, cured meats, cheese (farmer's cheese, cottage cheese .. not the hard cheese) and sour cream. Perhaps not food to eat while on a diet because it will stick to your ribs and fill you up and keep you going and going.

All in all, I treasure my taped up, spotted, tattered copy of Ms Brizova's original book and browse it frequently, each time revisiting my childhood. Here's timeless old-country cooking that will never go out of style.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 17, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Every Czech meal you can think of is described in this easy to follow cookbook, alhough many of the recipes are untraditional versions of old Czech food. Nevertheless, an easy cookbook for those who would like to venture into Czech cooking.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I have to disagree with Rita's review - I am Czech (I came here from Prague with my parents when I was very young), and grew up with Czech cooking. I don't remember my family ever using mace & nutmeg in recipes (although we did use a little bit of allspice in our goulash)... Also, as for the flours used in the desserts, I don't find them hard to find. The local grocery store carries the grainier-type flour, Wondra, which works perfectly well in the recipes. I do admit, though, that there are a few recipes in this book that I find strange & wouldn't try them... But overall, the book has some good recipes.
As for adapting these for 'today's cook' - I think the recipes lose a LOT if you "Americanize" them. The reason it is Czech food is just that - it's Czech, not American. It may use some different ingredients, but that is what makes it inherently Czech. Otherwise, you'll just get American. And why buy the book? Some things you just can't substitute.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K. King on August 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I've owned this book for years and use it frequently. As a Czech, I find it quite authentic. Many of the recipes come out just as I remember them from my childhood. The BUCHTY recipe is excellent, for example, as are many or the CUKROVI ones. I am surprised by the reviewer who says some of the dishes aren't authentic, because I've always had the impression that this book was a translation of a Czech cookbook. I agree with those reviewers who say that some of the dishes are unpractical or unpalatable in the American context. But such is the nature of Czech food! I like the fact that the names of the dishes are given in Czech and in English. My one problem with the book is the poorly organized index. Otherwise, DOBROU CHUT!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By mh330 on September 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I've used this cookbook for a couple of years now, and have mixed feelings about it. As some have already mentioned, for the uninitiated its hard to find the "classic" recipes in here, and you may wind up making some oddball thing that a true Czech has never heard of (but is still in this book for some reason). Secondly, i find that a lot of the savory recipes are a little off, and not true to form -- as in they usually feel like they're missing something, either a spice, or key ingredient. It feels like an *almost* authentic recipe, with just one thing missing. For the sweets and pastries though, you can't go wrong with this book.

I also have something to add that hasn't been mentioned yet, and that's regarding the actual writing of this book. It reads mostly as an ingredients list, with the instructions of the recipe often only 1 sentence long. While i understand that Czech cooking is usually not that complicated and can often be one-pot cooking, i feel like a lot of steps have been left out that a novice cook wouldn't know to do. Additionally, there is some confusion in the book, with base recipes presented in multiple forms. For exmaple, there are 2 pound cake recipes, which are then presented with multiple variations to create different end-products. Great in theory, but its never explained why the 2 base recipes are different, and when you should use one over the other. Instead, the variations always read "begin with pound cake recipe 1 or 2, add xyz...". I find that frustrating.

In any case, i think if you're a decent cook and have tasted most of these things before, you can improvise your way to the final product. Its the only resource i have for Czech recipes and as such i treasure it, but i also find it to be the most poorly written cookbook i own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?