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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More of a Volume 2 or "Pro" version than a second edition
In summary, the value here is outstanding. The book is a comprehensive set of best practices (including supporting rationale) that carries you and your data from the moment you lift your finger from the shutter release until the sun burns out.

I had recently read the first edition when I discovered that a second edition was in the works. I was very impressed...
Published on May 7, 2009 by K. Forsmo

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good reference, but tough read
This is a great reference book, but a tough read if you go cover to cover. I drug this book around for months, and I usually blow through a book in a matter of days. The author is well written, intelligent, and insightful. For instance he talks about one of the most common ways to lose data is to run out of space. If your hard drive is getting full, you might delete files...
Published on January 8, 2011 by Tenna Merchent


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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More of a Volume 2 or "Pro" version than a second edition, May 7, 2009
By 
K. Forsmo (Massachusetts USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
In summary, the value here is outstanding. The book is a comprehensive set of best practices (including supporting rationale) that carries you and your data from the moment you lift your finger from the shutter release until the sun burns out.

I had recently read the first edition when I discovered that a second edition was in the works. I was very impressed with the breadth and depth of the first book, and the second edition expands on both. I was a little concerned that I was buying a new cover, some corrected errata, and maybe a couple new concepts. While the cover is new, the book is what I'd consider either a "Pro" version, or a second volume. It turns the first edition into somewhat of an overview of all the concepts with implementations, still useful in its own right. However, there is a great deal of new material as well as added depth in the material covered in the first edition.

Similar to the first edition, the book presents an all-inclusive system for digital asset management. One of the attractions for me is that the system is essentially drawn from first principles in a variety of disciplines. For instance, it is written by a professional photographer who clearly has a need for a system that works day-to-day in the trenches, yet it's accessible to the layman since the author takes the time to explain the concepts behind the implementation. The author has clearly honed the system through a great deal of experience as well as significant research and what I'm finding to be active participation in the imaging and asset management communities.

A degree of computer facility is required to get the most from the book, but on the other hand I'd argue that the book isn't a bad way to learn some of the fundamentals and utility of metadata.

The system described is well thought-out, scalable, systematic, and addresses many key concerns of anyone with a computer and a camera. The book establishes some best practices (including explanations based on sound concepts as well as pitfalls to be aware of) for things like organization, rating, validation, backup, storage, and archiving, all while retaining usability. I admit that I don't hang out with any professional photographers, but with that being said, there is no one I know that has a system for managing their photo collection that safeguards it from loss while making it available to work on and share. Basically, everyone I know has had multiple cameras over the years and has an amorphous, unmanageable blob of photos strewn across hard drives, with no concept of what's there, what's backed up, what's safe, and what they're repeating whenever they try to sort, rate, or edit.

This book stands out among some of the others that I have read in that it clearly communicates the rationale behind the workflow steps (and presents alternatives). There are many successful photographers out there, and they all must have systems and workflows that work for them. There are other books that simply document a photographer's dogmatic process and leave a lot of questions and loose ends. It's tough to get a sense of the relative importance of all the interdependent decisions you have to make. The DAM Book, in contrast, leave very few questions or loose ends, and is very comprehensive, and to me the author's enthusiasm for the subject matter shows through. If you're unsure about something, the author is active and responsive in the forums over at thedambook.com.

Highly recommended and worth far more than I paid for it.
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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The "Must Have" Book for Digital Photographers, May 3, 2009
This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
Peter Krogh is arguably the leading industry expert on Digital Asset Management. His first edition of the book became the bible for countless photographers moving from film to digital. Now with that transition well behind us, Krogh has updated and expanded his book to cover many of the new tools available for photographers. He covers the latest versions of software applications like Photoshop CS4 and Lightroom. He clearly explains how to add metadata that will be critical in tracking future electronic uses and preventing your images from becoming orphan works. He refines his approach to digital asset management techniques that reflect the latest industry standards. (Many of which he helped create!)

His recommendations, if followed, will assure that photographers will not lose their valuable digital images and be able to quickly locate them and provide them for their clients.

I strongly recommend this book for anyone who is serious about digital photography.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Essential Work for Photographers, June 11, 2009
This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
Peter Krogh has completely revised his seminal book on Digital Asset Management. In the time since the last book, new programs, new concepts and new resources have appeared. At the same time, digital images and files continue to grow larger, filling our hard drives faster, and further pushing the need to store and organize these digital assets in a careful and efficient manner. This is not a mere "update" of the first book, but a complete revision, with current references to hardware, software, and issues the growing files and folders of images that have to be sorted.

Peter's writing is straight forward, informative, and filled with helpful advice. He explains all types of efforts, storage, programs and solutions. It is not a "do it my way" or else, but a careful and reasoned look at all of the options, and pros and cons of the same.

I look at the book as my primer on security and peace of mind. As he and most people note, it is not if your computer will crash, it is when a hard drive may fail. I loved his comment that when writing the book, he had his laptop fall off the desk, and he had to go to his clones and back ups in his hard drives to restore it. This book will give you the plan and ability to do this for your files and images.

Read this book a couple of times. It takes a while to get the whole picture, and what might work for you, and then keep it close as an essential reference.

We spend thousands of dollars on new cameras, lenses, cards, paper and ink, and in the end, what we really value the most is the image, and need to preserve the same. We all want to have the ability to find and print the best, or locate the shot of Cousin Joe when we need to. No longer must you search through boxes of negatives or prints, or try to recall what year and what date you took it, and hope that you put it away in the correct order. This book will help you organize your photographic life.

I cannot think of a photography or computer instruction book that was more helpful or better written than this book. It neither speaks down to to the beginner nor fails to challenge the expert. Buy it, read it, and refer to it.

Bill Bogle, Jr.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, June 8, 2009
This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
Amongst serious photographers, two kinds need to read this book: those who never read the first edition of "the DAM Book"; and those who did. Quite simply, this is essential reading for serious photographers.

Digital Asset Management is the process of storing and recovering digital photographs. It's the nature of digital photography to create lots of images. How does one find them? The folder, no matter how cleverly named, is the digital equivalent of the shoe box. If you filed something under the subject of the photograph, it became hard to find if you only could recall, say, a date, unless you had some sort of cross reference file. You had to rely on memory, and even for young'ons that can sometimes be a problem, to say nothing of old timers. Computer data bases are great for this, but there are all kinds of tricks to using them effectively.

Then there is the fact that sometimes even computers fail. It always astounded me that folks were willing to trust something like a disk drive, where one of the descriptive statistics is "mean time to failure". Read your warranty and you'll see there is no guarantee that covers precious data.

That's where Peter Krogh comes in. He's thought a lot about this and gives the reader the benefit of his thinking from the simplest one-man set up with a backup drive and a DVD burner to elaborate networked computers with problems created by multiple people working on many files simultaneously.

For readers of the first volume, much computer technology has changed. When the first edition was written there was no Lightroom with its integrated solutions or blue ray burners. I remember paying $800.00 dollars for cataloging software and several hundred for a CD burner! There are cheaper solutions available today, and as a result different workflow practices that better utilize the equipment available.

Krogh emphasizes that many of the solutions he discusses may be overkill for the individual non-professional photographer, but the points he makes are to be considered in deciding what kind of DAM system you want. For example, getting a blue ray burner may seem extremely expensive today, but recognizing that blue ray or something similar will be available more cheaply means that we should develop a system that can incorporate the change when the better technology is appropriate.

Along the way, Krogh scatters tips that people with better developed asset management schemes will be happy to learn about. For example, Adobe Bridge, while allowing you to add metadata with your copyright information still has no way to fill in the small field that says an image is copyrighted. Krough provides a little XML (I think that's right) that one can add to one's preset to deal with this problem.

For most photographers, reading the technical details of an asset management system is nowhere near as interesting as capturing images or even jockeying Photoshop around. Still if you do all that work and you can't find the picture, you won't be happy. I won't say that Krogh impressed me with the second edition, but halfway through I ordered another back-up drive.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good reference, but tough read, January 8, 2011
By 
Tenna Merchent (Noblesville, IN USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
This is a great reference book, but a tough read if you go cover to cover. I drug this book around for months, and I usually blow through a book in a matter of days. The author is well written, intelligent, and insightful. For instance he talks about one of the most common ways to lose data is to run out of space. If your hard drive is getting full, you might delete files to make space, or there might be corruption due to the lack of space. If you're out in the field, and your memory card is getting full, you may pull it out while it's still writing and lose everything, or accidentally format a card with valuable images on it. Yikes, nobody wants that to happen.

He also points out, that just because your images are not well organized, and may have many duplicates, is no reason not to back them up. Bite the bullet, pay for the extra storage space, get everything backed up, then go organize your stuff.

If you want to know about what you need to have a sound plan to protect your images, this book can put you on the path. He has great detail about just about everything; non-destructive image editing, metadata, organizing and naming files and folders, hardware for storage, backing up and validating, ingestion (getting your images on your computer or hard drive), Lightroom or camera raw workflow, cataloging strategies and data migration. It is so much detail, it is sort of painful to read. I finally found that I could pick a chapter I was interested in, read it, highlight it, re-read it, and learn from it.

On page 203 in the side bar he says "If this is too daunting for you...you probably need a good computer consultant..." Okay, well, I was sort of hoping to avoid that, but maybe not. Even if you do end up hiring a consultant, if you have looked up the subject in this book, you will at least be familiar with the terminology they use.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great second book, May 15, 2009
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
I read the first book with the same title and thought it was well written and very useful. I have to change my mind the new book with the same title is great! The information is presented in a more organized and fundamentals based fashion, the metaphors are great and the examples are great. This is not like a second edition, but it is a new book with the same subject by the same author. If you want to get your collection of files (note not only photos, videos, music, but all of your files) under control and make sure they are safe this is the book for you. The book lead me to solutions to several of my issues. The book would be worth several times the cost!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A DAM good book, January 31, 2010
By 
R. H. Hachadoorian (Great Neck, NY United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
This book is far more that an update on the original DAM book. It has been completely re-written and is far more expansive and comprehensive than Peter Krogh's first book. Keeping track of the thousands of photos that not only professional but even amateur photographers generate is a difficult task. Krogh doesn't necessarily make it easy since this is a complex issue, but he does fantastic job taking this complex issue and making it into something that is not only comprehensible but capable of being actually being useful. He deals with each issue involved in cataloging in a straight forward and logical manner and moves on to the next, building on the previous issue, such that by the end of the book you have a complete and logical system that will enable you to catalog, search and backup your entire photo collection.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book will improve your life, May 9, 2009
By 
John Breitinger (Minneapolis, MN USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
Once in a while, you read something that actually improves your life. I have learned most of my life's lessons by paying lots of tuition. Fortunately, I found Peter's first book shortly after making the transition from film to digital photography. Peter's lessons helped me to avoid making several tuition payments. It was enormously helpful in offering both a holistic view of how to manage all of my work and a lot of nitty gritty detail too.

I would characterize myself as a serious amateur. Learning to work efficiently with digital media files, to secure them and to manage them has allowed me to do more and has added tremendous value to my work. Now, rather than an attic full of of boxes of old photos that I would visit every few years, I have pretty good access to a lifetime of images. And, they get used.

The new version of the book is a very good update, covering all of the new technology and many new techniques. I consider this a critical desktop reference for anyone who works with digital media.

Peter also hosts a very good forum where anyone can drill as deeply as they need to into any issue related to digital asset management and receive the best available expert advice. Thanks Peter.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The DAM bible, November 13, 2009
By 
David Nobel (North Dartmouth, MA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
This terrific book explains the present state of evolution of Peter Krough's seminal work in digital asset management. If you own and use the first edition, you will want this one for the many changes and refinements he has implemented. If you are new to the topic, you can start here. Combine reading this book with visiting his terrific website, and you should have all the knowledge you need to implement and maintain a long-term DAM strategy to suit your particular needs. If you don't see your questions already answered on his excellent online forum, you can post them yourself. They are often addressed by the author himself. Since this is essentially the only game in town, we are fortunate that it is well written, well organized, and most of all and on a continuing basis, well thought out. As far as DAM goes, Krough play the long game, and we all benefit.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent organizational ideas, December 21, 2009
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This review is from: The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers (Paperback)
This is the definitive work on organization of your photographs. This new version updates the available storage media types and offers suggestions for efficient organization and storage. You need to read this if you own a digital camera and store you photos for later view, print, and archive purposes.
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The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers
The DAM Book: Digital Asset Management for Photographers by Peter Krogh (Paperback - May 7, 2009)
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