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395 of 403 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for young girls (or boys) - you'll love it as much as your kid!
This is the perfect book to share with your daughter/ granddaughter/that special girl you know who is a tween or young teen. It has just the right mix of articles - informative, fun, and stimulating! When the "Dangerous Book for Boys" came out I wished for a version for girls and this book is as good as the one for boys if not better.

When you first flip...
Published on November 9, 2007 by ZenWoman

versus
64 of 79 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Daring Book for Girls
I picked up this book in the store and realized it is representative of what I learned as a girl scout brownie over twenty years ago (friendship songs, how to make bracelets, pressing flowers, outdoor things, etc). Maybe this is what girls wanted to know in the fifties, but it is less than "daring" for girls of this era.

What bugged me was how terribly silly it...
Published on January 2, 2008 by Amazon Customer


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395 of 403 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for young girls (or boys) - you'll love it as much as your kid!, November 9, 2007
This is the perfect book to share with your daughter/ granddaughter/that special girl you know who is a tween or young teen. It has just the right mix of articles - informative, fun, and stimulating! When the "Dangerous Book for Boys" came out I wished for a version for girls and this book is as good as the one for boys if not better.

When you first flip through its pages it will remind you of the time you were her age. You probably read a book almost like this but not quite. I say not quite as this book does a perfect balancing act between skills and general knowledge, between techniques we learned from our grandmothers and the ones that became popular later. It tells you "how to press flowers" but also "five karate moves". "Make your own quill pen" is preceded by "how to change a tire". I remember reading a book almost like this in my childhood. I dearly treasured that book till its pages were yellow and stiff into my college days. I spent many afternoons after school experimenting with the projects. I remember the bitter candy apples I made from a recipe in that book, or the quill pen with which I wrote my "secret language" notes for my friends and this book brought back those memories. With more words than illustrations, the Daring book for Girls will encourage the girl who reads it to use her imagination.

This book will appeal to the "girly-girl" in every girl with the sections like "Palm reading", "Hopscotch", "Princesses today" or "Boys"; to her sense of adventure with articles like "Going to Africa" (short section on each country), "Hiking", "Reading tide charts"; and to the "builder" in her with sections like "Building a campfire", "Tree swings", "Every girl's toolbox". There is a ton of useful information and facts in this book too for those rainy or quiet days - "from French terms of endearment" to "Queens of Ancient world" to "Women Inventors". Sports are covered too - basketball, softball, netball, bowling, playing cards and more.

My daughter was thrilled to get this book. I wasn't sure she'd like it as much as I liked my childhood book. But she began her next project "how to tie a sari" in minutes and over dinner started telling me about the women inventors in the book. We have now designated this book the "mother-daughter time" book. Each weekend, we pick up the book and try something new! What a great antidote to the "Mom, I'm bored" refrain!

Some are activities she can attempt on her own and for others like building the ultimate scooter she will need help as it requires some sawing and drilling. It is a challenge for me too as I've not really attempted to build anything from scratch before. I'm ready with my saw and drill and as excited as her to begin that project!

This book gives just the right kind of stimulation for a younger girl's (or boy's) curious mind and their thirst for new knowledge and skills. This book will also grow with the reader as it gives practical advice and even contains chapters like "Stocks and shares" and "Negotiating salaries." This book is therefore highly recommended and will make a great gift for a 7-14 year old.
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162 of 171 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sparking Imagination, November 12, 2007
There are certain things that every girl should learn in her young life, like how to press flowers, what games to play at a slumber party, and how to put her hair up with a pencil. You know, girly things. But they also need to know things like salary negotiation, self defense with karate, and how to change a tire.

She'll get that and more in The Daring Book For Girls, by authors Andrea Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz. This wonderful collection of projects, primers, and practical advice is so compelling and fun to read that I found myself browsing through it for hours after my daughter went to bed.

The letters of Abigail Adams, the history of women in the Olympics, making a lemon-powered clock... The book is packed with stimulating knowledge and activities. It's sure to stir my daughter's imagination for years to come. The authors have wisely designed the book to appeal to a wide range of ages, from 8 to 18. I'm well beyond those years, and NOT a girl, and even I'm envious of the new worlds of information that will be introduced to my daughter through these pages.

If you're the parent, or grandparent, of a girl, think twice before you spend your holiday money on some new toy or electronic gadget. The Daring Book For Girls will be the gift that gets the most attention this year.
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111 of 117 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you have a daughter, buy this book!, November 8, 2007
By 
PunditMom "Joanne Bamberger" (The shadow of the nation's capital) - See all my reviews
I don't know what I like better -- The Daring Book for Girls or the fact that it's written by two women I greatly admire, Andrea Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz.

Written as a sequel, of sorts, to last year's The Dangerous Book for Boys, The Daring Book for Girls is a compendium of activities and information to help today's girls rediscover that there are ways to have fun besides shopping at the mall, watching Hannah Montana or IM'ing their friends.

As the mother of a seven-year-old daughter, I was thrilled when I learned that the founders of MotherTalk would be writing this book and couldn't wait to see what it would have in store.

When it arrived, my daughter and I were both very excited because it's just got so much STUFF! Where to begin? There was so much to take in after I was done ooh-ing and aah-ing over the beautiful teal cover with the sparkly silver letters (yes, that did appeal to the "girl" in me!)

How to make a lemon-powered clock (really!)? Reading the chapters on women who were pirates and spies? How to make a tree swing or check out the list of books "that will change your life?"

Aimed at the "tween" girl market, it is perfect for that age group, billing itself as the book "for every girl with an independent spirit and a nose for trouble."

If you're the parent of a daughter who could use a little nudging to take off the headphones and get a little fresh air, then this book is just what the doctor (or Santa) ordered. There are so many great craft ideas and topics to spark the imagination of a girl it's hard to know where to start.

Since the book's release, some commenters have questioned whether this type of book can really have an impact on the way our daughters are socialized today -- can we really hope that a book that is an homage to our childhoods in the 1970s will be the tonic that will drag our girls out from behind the laptops and forsake the sassy outfits?

Can it really get our girls away from the world of Libby Lu parties, Bratz Dolls, and questionable Halloween outfits?

Is it too much to take the feminist optimism we had as girls of the MS. generation and help our daughters discover that they can do "boy" things, too? I think it's imperative. At seven, my daughter is already succumbing to the phenomenon of boys having too much sway on her budding self-esteem. If a few of the activities in this book can help boost her already waning self-confidence, then I'm going to go for it.

Perhaps it is too much to expect that one book can start a new feminist wave for our daughters of the 21st Century. But if we don't start somewhere, who will?

As a parent, I can't be responsible for reclaiming the girlhoods of all the "tweens" in America by making them turn off the Disney Channel and sit down to make a quill pen or learn about Queens of the Ancient World. But I can start with one excited second-grader and I'm planning on doing just that.

What I can do is take one second-grade girl, who is chomping at the bit to dig into the activities in The Daring Book for Girls, and help her discover things she never thought she could do. And I can make sure other moms know about it, too.
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60 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic book for all kinds of kids, November 13, 2007
I am a fifth grade school teacher, so I see a lot of books meant for kids who are growing up. many of these books, especially the books geared for girls tend to be very dramatic, social survival guides that delve into the social ins and outs of growing up at younger and younger ages.

This book rises above all of that in the same way that the Dangerous book for boys (also a staple in my classroom) did. It tells kids that it is OK to be kids, it is OK to have a lot of interests, from sports to science to history to literature, to enjoy life by doing.

when I discovered this book on amazon I looked at the table of contents and was delighted at what I saw; the rules of basketball, how to tie a sari, campfire songs and many more topics. I called the girls in my class over, some who are jocks, some who are girly-girls, some who are science minded, and our social butterflies. accross the board each and every girl found something to love about this book, to the extent that there was a fight over it when it arrived in our classroom.

I am convinced that if there were more books like these telling kids to be kids and live life rather than play video games or watch TV all day, the world would be a better place.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book, November 5, 2007
This is not a girly book. It's not sexist or anti-male. It's a book full of fun, wonderful, clean adventures and lots of useful information for girls of all ages. And don't girls need all the help they can get? I sure wish this had been around when I was a girl.

The book begins with all the essential gear girls just have to have. Included are a swiss army knife described as a key tool for survival, a bandana to keep your head cool, rope and twine to help learn about knots, a journal (that's a big one), a hair band for girls with long hair-- duct tape, to fix almost everything, and patience--which is described in the book as a quality and not a thing.

The book tells girls to not try and be perfect. (Good for all of us.) In the face of frustration, your best tools are a few deep breaths, and remembering that you can do anything once you've practiced it two hundred times. Isn't that wonderful advice? Girls especially are sort of perfectionists. As girls, we tend to think we have to be better and never make a mistake. This books helps girls to discover they don't need to be perfect BUT that if they keep trying, they'll be great!

Highly recommended.
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64 of 79 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Daring Book for Girls, January 2, 2008
By 
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I picked up this book in the store and realized it is representative of what I learned as a girl scout brownie over twenty years ago (friendship songs, how to make bracelets, pressing flowers, outdoor things, etc). Maybe this is what girls wanted to know in the fifties, but it is less than "daring" for girls of this era.

What bugged me was how terribly silly it seemed when compared to "The Dangerous Book for Boys" by Conn and Hal Iggulden on the same store shelf. The version written for boys (also published by William Morrow) was amusing and easy to read, included intelligent and interesting information: how things work, mechanics, astronomy, herbology, entomology, how to make a treehouse, etc. I bought the boy book instead.

My recommendation: Scratch out "Boy" on the title, write "Girl" instead, and give the "Dangerous Book for Boys" to your little girl - she will get much more out it, learn many meaningful/useful things, and enjoy herself in the process.

I know I did.

----------------------
10/09/2013 Updates
- Based on other reviewers feedback updated this review from 2 to 3 stars. There are a few positive aspects that while not quite congruent with my opinion of "daring" are at least relevant and interesting: sports rules, karate, female pirates, first aid, knots.
- Noted that the images in the kindle version of this book are not really functional, if this book is right for you, would strongly suggest against the kindle version.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Daring Girls" Lives Up To It's Title., December 1, 2007
By 
Robyn Lee Markow "webcat1" (Northridge, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book celebrates the fact that you can change a tire,be good at math,play softball & still be a girl,which I think is great.So I bought it out of both curosity & admiration,(although I figured there'd be one eventually)that there is now a female equivalant of "Dangerous Book For Boys" Also,the hand-clapping songs,daisy chains & the infamous "Bloody Mary" legend brought back many fond memories for me. I just wish the book had more art projects,but perhaps in the the next book(?),they're will be. Also,the book has a slightly slapdash feel to it,one topic follows another without rhyme or reason. For example: how to make a book cover follows an article on Cleopatra,follows an article about how to deal with boys(which btw,is both sensible & age-appropriate).I feel the book should have catergories,but that's an adult P.O.V., not one of a tween girl(whom this book is definately aimed at) Also,I spotted a few typos,though my spelling isn't the greatest at times (as you can see here) OK, but I'm nit-picking. The over-all spirit of the book wins you over & definately would make a cool gift for a "daring" girl(or mother/aunt/ big sister of one:-)!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Equal to or better than the Boys' book...., November 3, 2007
... depending on whether you prefer hunting and tanning (boys) or jump-rope and karate (girls). Much of the content in the Daring Book for Girls is very like the content in the Dangerous Book for Boys, with slight variations which are nice if you happen to have both. If you are a parent wondering whether to buy this for your daughter or go with the boys' book because you think it might be better, rest assured, this one is every bit as fun, adventuresome and fascinating as the boys' book. I have a young daughter and bought the boys' book before I knew there would be a girls' one; now I have them both and side-by-side I can say this one at the very least lives up to its predecessor, and in my opinion surpasses it, although both are excellent.

There are things in this book I'd completely forgotten that I did as a girl. Remember four-square? Elastics? Daisy-chains? Friendship bracelets and hand-clap games? And there are some fascinating tidbits in here, too; did you know Julia Child was a spy before she became a famous TV chef? Who would have thought it? There's a neat section on "Vedic math" tricks, which are something I've always thought amazingly cool and useful. And another neat thing is the international flavor of the book; living in the U.S. but having grown up in New Zealand, it's a real treat to see netball included here among the ball/court games, right between basketball and korfball!!

Really, moms and dads, do your girls a favor and buy this book, it's worth every penny (for the nostalgia factor alone, hehe).
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book for young girls (or boys) - you'll love it as much as your kid!, October 31, 2007
This is the perfect book to share with your daughter/ granddaughter/that special girl you know, whether she is 8 or 18 or somewhere in between. It has just the right mix of articles - informative, fun, and stimulating! When the "Dangerous Book for Boys" came out I wished for a version for girls and this book is as good as the one for boys if not better.

When you first flip through its pages it will remind you of the time you were her age. You probably read a book almost like this but not quite. I say not quite as this book does a perfect balancing act between skills and general knowledge, between techniques we learned from our grandmothers and the ones that became popular later. It tells you "how to press flowers" but also "five karate moves". "Make your own quill pen" is preceded by "how to change a tire". I remember reading a book almost like this in my childhood. I dearly treasured that book till its pages were yellow and stiff into my college days. I spent many afternoons after school experimenting with the projects. I remember the bitter candy apples I made from a recipe in that book, or the quill pen with which I wrote my "secret language" notes for my friends and this book brought back those memories. With more words than illustrations, the Daring book for Girls will encourage the girl who reads it to use her imagination.

This book will appeal to the "girly-girl" in every girl with the sections like "Palm reading", "Hopscotch", "Princesses today" or "Boys"; to her sense of adventure with articles like "Going to Africa" (short section on each country), "Hiking", "Reading tide charts"; and to the "builder" in her with sections like "Building a campfire", "Tree swings", "Every girl's toolbox". There is a ton of useful information and facts in this book too for those rainy or quiet days - "from French terms of endearment" to "Queens of Ancient world" to "Women Inventors". Sports are covered too - basketball, softball, netball, bowling, playing cards and more.

My daughter was thrilled to get this book. I wasn't sure she'd like it as much as I liked my childhood book. But she began her next project "how to tie a sari" in minutes and over dinner started telling me about the women inventors in the book. We have now designated this book the "mother-daughter time" book. Each weekend, we pick up the book and try something new! What a great antidote to the "Mom, I'm bored" refrain!

Some are activities she can attempt on her own and for others like building the ultimate scooter she will need help as it requires some sawing and drilling. It is a challenge for me too as I've not really attempted to build anything from scratch before. I'm ready with my saw and drill and as excited as her to begin that project!

This book gives just the right kind of stimulation for a younger girl's (or boy's) curious mind and their thirst for new knowledge and skills. This book will also grow with the reader as it gives practical advice for situations and even contains chapters like "Stocks and shares" and "Negotiating salaries." This book is therefore highly recommended and will make a great gift for a 7-14 year old.
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65 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highest Compliments Department, October 28, 2007
By 
Bart King (Portland, Oregon) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
One of the highest compliments the author of a book for younger readers can get is from a parent who says, "I wish there had been a book like this when I was a kid."

My guess is that authors Buchanan and Peskowitz will hear this a fair amount from older readers who fall prey to their daughters' nightstands. Despite its sidekick status as the companion volume for the extraordinarily successful The Dangerous Book for Boys, The Daring Book for Girls more than holds its own. Like the boys' volume, this one has a great, retro design, and handsome interior layout.

But content is where the Daring Book really shines. It has terrific pacing, as the chapters alternate between activities and interesting information about history and culture. The underlying emphasis is on being active and (dare I write it?) daring. There's a can-do tone that informs Daring Book that I found really admirable... and my guess is that boys who voyage beyond its front cover will as well. Terrific work! See also The Big Book of Girl Stuff, the best book for this readership that I've ever written. :)
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The Daring Book for Girls CD
The Daring Book for Girls CD by Miriam Peskowitz (Audio CD - October 30, 2007)
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