James Ellroy's LA: City of Demons 1 Season 2011

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(21)
Available in HD

5. The Dark Side of Hollywood TV-14 CC

The madcap misdeeds and misfortune of tinsel town notables is nothing new. Throughout a hundred years of Hollywood heinousness, stars have been strung out, snuffed out, locked up, and lusted over. Crime author James Ellroy explores the dark side of fame.

Starring:
James Ellroy, Peter Nikkos
Runtime:
44 minutes
Original air date:
April 18, 2011

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Dark Side of Hollywood

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.
Season 1

Product Details

Genres Documentary
Starring James Ellroy, Peter Nikkos
Supporting actors Ryan Beard, Sarah Delpizzo, Emma Green, Jarred Kjack, Nicollé Lewis, Melissa Marino, Rob Nelson, Ian Scott Rudolph, Franklin Ruehl
Season year 2011
Network Investigation Discovery
Producers Peter Hankwitz
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

The dog talks, too.
Stacy
If it were Ellroy taking us through cases and how they impacted LA, were viewed at the time and how they were resolved (or not) that would be cool.
GFX
Was expecting something like movie LA Confidential.
Robert Wood

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

If you've only read James Ellroy's crime novels, you've been missing out on the eccentric persona behind the pages. Perhaps a little Ellroy will go a long way--he's a bit of a love it or hate it proposition. Having been a successful writer for thirty years, he has a fascination with the dark side and his obsession invariably led to "L. A.: City of Demons"--an original documentary series for the Investigation Discovery network (admit it, you spend hours perusing ID). Ellroy has an inherent fascination with the underbelly of Los Angeles which began with the brutal slaying of his mother and is showcased in some of his most noteworthy books (Black Dahlia, L. A. Confidential). With his larger-than-life personality in full affect and his offbeat verbal stylings in unique form, Ellroy actually kicks off this six episode production with a feature that includes his mother's murder.

His potboiler style, nihilism, and noir conventions actually align fairly well with the stories he wishes to share in this series. This probably won't be used as promotional material by the Los Angeles Department of Tourism any time soon.

(1) Dead Women Own Me: Ellroy explores cases that have had a real impact on his life and psyche including the aforementioned Black Dahlia and his mother's case.
(2) The Scandal Rags: Explores the pulp publications that made notoriety with high profile stories such as the Lana Turner scandal.
(3) L. A. Serial Killers: Seems self-explanatory.
(4) Dames and Delinquents: Exposes notorious cases that involve organized crime including the murder of a famed mob princess.
(5) The Dark Side of Hollywood: A look at celebrity culture.
(6) Hot Spot Homicide: A profile on notorious bars, clubs and prohibition era speakeasies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GFX on February 9, 2014
You would think James Ellroy and LA crime would go hand in hand, but no. There really is not anything wrong with Ellroy's delivery, he is hammy but it meshes with his writing. However this show really doesn't seem to go anywhere because it lacks direction. If it were Ellroy taking us through cases and how they impacted LA, were viewed at the time and how they were resolved (or not) that would be cool. It would be what I expected. The reality is the show tries to do these things but with little resolution, then add in an ill conceived animated dog which Ellroy talks to (yes you read that correctly) you have an hour of nothing but missed potential.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bradley P. Valentine on September 17, 2013
Even as an Ellroy fan, it still took a little bit for me to get past the alliteration and the delivery (BAM!). And that's not even accounting for the dog, haha. But I grew to kinda like all the wackiness to those ideas. I sorta like the Ellroy myth anyway. After I watched the show a bit, I realized why that stuff is there. All of this gets so dark and dreary a little punch drunk humor works in pretty nicely. I wish there had been more, but I see by the original air date that Discovery pulled this show pretty fast and then dumped the remainder on one night a few months after. O what would the Demon Dog say?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I watched one episode....unbelievably horrible. The writing for James Ellory's narration/commentary is terrible, cringe-inducing and worst of wall, it completely distracts for the story being told. I mean WTF? What writer/show runner/network executive thought this was good?? Really? All you should get out of the business now. And what's with the animated dog? Embarrassing. But what's really frustrating is the concept had potential and it was totally blown by complete idiots who should be barred from ever production a television series again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Stacy TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 4, 2011
I am a True Crime buff. I love hearing how mysteries are solved and some of the worst criminals captured to pay for their heinous crimes. Today I had my cable connection upgraded to Digital, and as a consequence, I gained access to Investigation Discovery (ID - channel 139 for Time Warner customers in NE Ohio). Ecstatic, I quickly turned on the TV and snuggled into my quilt: joy of joys! An entire channel devoted to forensic science!

I managed to catch an episode of James Ellroy's LA: City of Demons. I vaguely remember seeing advertisements for this show on truTV; at the time I had cataloged it in the back of my mind to try and catch when I got my cable upgrade. Within two minutes of finding the channel I had already changed it to another. James Ellroy's narration is horrible. You cannot escape it, either. He talks throughout the entire episode, stopping only for the occasional interview of family members of the victim or detectives who worked on the case.

As can be surmised, the show focuses on crimes (murders, thus far) that occurred in the Los Angeles, California metropolitan area. Rather than covering more obscure crimes, Mr. Ellroy discusses cases that other shows have covered. In fact, the episode that I watched (I forced myself to watch an entire episode to ensure my initial judgment was sound [it was]) covered a crime that I know Cold Case Files documented a few years ago.

The show itself follows a standard format: introduction of the case, description of the investigation, the results of the court trial, and a brief rehash before the show ends. Throughout the episode Mr. Ellroy narrates; this is the part of the show that brings an otherwise potentially interesting crime documentary down into oblivion. Mr.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews