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The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger: (The Dark Tower #1)(Revised Edition) Kindle Edition

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Length: 280 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Thirty-three years, a horrific and life-altering accident, and thousands of desperately rabid fans in the making, Stephen King's quest to complete his magnum opus rivals the quest of Roland and his band of gunslingers who inhabit the Dark Tower series. Loyal DT fans and new readers alike will appreciate this revised edition of The Gunslinger, which breathes new life into Roland of Gilead, and offers readers a "clearer start and slightly easier entry into Roland's world."

King writes both a new introduction and foreword to this revised edition, and the ever-patient, ever-loyal "constant reader" is rewarded with secrets to the series's inception. That a "magic" ream of green paper and a Robert Browning poem, came together to reveal to King his "ka" is no real surprise (this is King after all), but who would have thought that the squinty-eyed trio of Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach would set the author on his true path to the Tower? While King credits Tolkien for inspiring the "quest and magic" that pervades the series, it was Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly that helped create the epic proportions and "almost absurdly majestic western backdrop" of Roland's world.

To King, The Gunslinger demanded revision because once the series was complete it became obvious that "the beginning was out of sync with the ending." While the revision adds only 35 pages, Dark Tower purists will notice the changes to Allie's fate and Roland's interaction with Cort, Jake, and the Man in Black--all stellar scenes that will reignite the hunger for the rest of the series. Newcomers will appreciate the details and insight into Roland's life. The revised Roland of Gilead (nee Deschain) is embodied with more humanity--he loves, he pities, he regrets. What DT fans might miss is the same ambiguity and mystery of the original that gave the original its pulpy underground feel (back when King himself awaited word from Roland's world). --Daphne Durham

From Library Journal

King's (Pet Sematary, Audio Reviews, LJ 11/1/98) fantastical and allegorical "Dark Tower" series commenced in 1982 with the publication of The Gunslinger. Subsequent volumes have appeared about every five years thereafter. The Gunslinger introduces protagonist Roland as he pursues the Man in Black through bleak and tired landscapes in a world that has "moved on." Roland believes that the Man in Black knows and can be made to reveal the secrets of the Dark Tower, which is the ultimate goal of Roland's quest. The Waste Lands sees Roland and his fellow travelers continuing the quest for the Dark Tower. They journey through imaginative landscapes, over astounding obstacles, and meet with and confront a unique and fully drawn cast of characters, both human and nonhuman. Reader Frank Muller gives voice to the characters with a thoroughly engaging precision, accuracy, and great humanity and with an edge that drives the story onward and seems to amplify King's skill as an author. Highly recommended for all fiction collections.?Kristen L. Smith, Loras Coll. Lib., Dubuque, IA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1519 KB
  • Print Length: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; Reprint edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Publication Date: July 1, 2003
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000OCXILW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,994 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Doctor Sleep and Under the Dome, now a major TV miniseries on CBS. His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller as well as the Best Hardcover Book Award from the International Thriller Writers Association. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first installment of Steven King's fantasy series, The Dark Tower, which follows the story of the Gunslinger Roland, the equivalent of an Arthurian knight in the world King has created, and his quest to reach the Dark Tower in order to make the world right again.
This installment tells the story of Roland's search for a mysterious stranger who may be able to help Roland find the Dark Tower. It is long on atmosphere and short on action. Therefore, fans of Steven King's horror works will find this book a distinct change of pace. However, the book will not disappoint you if you try it, especially if you are a fan of fantasy series such as the Lord of the Rings. Furthermore, you will find in later books that elements of King's horror world also exist in Roland's world, and therefore, to have a full understanding of King's horror villains, you have to read this series.
The Gunslinger offers several intriguing views of Roland's dying world. The book is not devoid of action; there is a dramatic shoot out for shadowy reasons which one hopes will be better explained in the concluding volumes of the work. There is a lost child who provides the first direct evidence that Roland's world is connected to our own, and there is the introduction to Roland himself, a man who is capable of fantastic violence but still comes across as human and quite possibly kind (a fact which becomes more clear in later books).
I recommend this book most highly to anyone who enjoys stories involving quests such as Arthurian legends, the Chronicles of Prydain and the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings.
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Format: Paperback
I did not find The Gunslinger itself to be an enjoyable read, at all. The pacing was odd, the voice was bleak, the writing rather juvenile, even after a clean-up attempt by a much older King, and the ending was nigh incomprehensible to me. After reading it, I had absolutely no plans of pursuing the Dark Tower series further.

But!

A friend (to whom I am eternally indebted) practically force-fed me the second book of the series, The Drawing of the Three, and from there I was hooked. The rest of the series captivated me. It made me laugh and (toward the end) cry so hard that I occasionally had to put the book down and compose myself before I could keep reading. These days I'm an evangelical DT fan, pestering everyone I know to try the series. It's just such a bother that I have to tell everyone "You won't like this, but read it, the other six are amazing."
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've read a number of reviews of the series and have been told by friends how great it is, so I decided to check it out. Reading and understanding the intro/forward King has written in this revised edition helped a great deal. King wrote this book early in his career with the intention of writing a grand epic. He explains the author of this book at the time had not really found his groove so to speak and had spent a little too much time in writing seminars. One particularly revealing comment King makes about himself was that the seminars taught him to favor ambiguity over clarity and simplicity. He also goes on to mention when he revised the book he found many areas for improvement, but was able to leave the writing alone in places where he was seduced into forgetting the writing seminars by a particulary entrancing piece of story.
I find this captures the book well. Reading it, the book shifts from a very interesting tangible plot to the Gunslinger slipping into ambiguous dreaming and past thoughts within the same page. You can almost tell where King has gone back and done revisions as you can see his 30+ years of experience fixing his amateur mistakes.
Taken by itself, I didn't find the book that intriguing. Just average. Taken as a series I will definitely trek on to the future volumes as a number of people have told me the first one is sort of one you just have to get through. It's good it is a quick read and sets up alot of what will be revealed later.
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Format: Hardcover
Well, this is a difficult review to write. Like many reviewers here, I've been reading this series from its inception, since I was a young man (about Jakes age). It has remained one of my favorite series, and each new volume was awaited with a barely containable anticipation.

I agree with so many of the glowing reviews of this book.

And I agree with so many of the disappointed reviews of this book as well. I am completely conflicted.

However, what it boils down to is this: The story lost the breadth and scope that made it so epic for me in the early volumes. The Tower was the center of ALL WORLDS! An infinite number of universes hung in the balance. This wasn't your average quest story, this was a story about ALL quests, in ALL times. King Arthur, Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Tain, Ulysses, the Good the Bad and the Ugly...all of these epics found an echo here. Billions upon billions of existences were hanging in the balance between what we were lead to believe was an epic evil (one that found its way into many of Kings stories) and the Gunslinger and his Ka Tet. The wheels of fate worked to bring about the central struggle of all times and places to a boiling point that we could not even begin to conceive of. How could the stakes get any higher? In all honesty, how could any writer fill such a grand expectation? In the first book, Roland has a vision, given him by Flagg, of ascending through the universes to emerge in a single blade of grass at the foot of a rose. The scope of what was at stake was never more beautifully crafted than that section of the first book.

By the end of the tale, I can find no trace of that scope, that scale, those horrendous stakes. They are gone.
Read more ›
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Useless kindle sample
I agree. I recently downloaded a sample that contained nothing but the title, publisher and author info pages. How is that helpful to me in deciding if I'm interested in the content? Samples should contain at least a portion of the first chapter if not the whole thing.
Jan 24, 2012 by Philip E. Deason |  See all 3 posts
Are there parts missing from the original, first edition?
I don't know if you've made the leap yet, but here are my thoughts...
The new version is more in line with how the series evolved over the decades. There are a LOT of small changes (I've seen it said that almost every sentence was changed in some minor way), and some of the foreshadowing was... Read More
Aug 12, 2009 by Cole |  See all 2 posts
Do Kindle editions come with illustrations?
Yes.
Dec 5, 2011 by Amazon Customer |  See all 2 posts
Plume editions?
If you're referring to the version of the Gunslinger put out by Plume with a purple-ish border on the cover then yes, there are "matching" books for I-IV.

The Gunslinger - purple border
The Drawing Of The Three - blue border
The Waste Lands - green border
Wizard And Glass - maroon... Read More
Feb 15, 2010 by J. Cramer |  See all 2 posts
Why do the Dark Tower series audiobooks cost so much?
Check it out on audible.com, the series is more affordable as an audibook at that site than the $200 price offered by third party sellers for audiobook on the amazon site.
Mar 29, 2012 by A. Anwar |  See all 2 posts
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