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The Dark Wind (Jim Chee Novels) Mass Market Paperback – October 5, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: Jim Chee Novels
  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTorch; 1st edition (October 5, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061000035
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061000034
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.8 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #992,802 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Background, characters, story—all first rate.” (Amarillo Texas News)

“Hillerman is first-rate ....Fresh, original, and highly suspenseful.” (Los Angeles Times)

“Hillerman’s best book in an already strong series.” (New Republic)

“Tony Hillerman continues to teach and delight.” (NC Citizen Times)

About the Author


Tony Hillerman is past president of the Mystery Writers of America and has received their Edgar and Grand Master awards. His other honors include the Center for the American Indian's Ambassador Award, the Silver Spur Award for best novel set in the West, and the Navajo Tribe's Special Friend Award. He lives with his wife, Marie, in Albuquerque, NM.


More About the Author

Tony Hillerman was the former president of the Mystery Writers of America and received its Edgar® and Grand Master awards. His other honors include the Center for the American Indian's Ambassador Award, the Silver Spur Award for the best novel set in the West, and the Navajo Tribe's Special Friend Award. He lived with his wife in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Customer Reviews

Jim Chee in Tony Hillerman books is a good chacater I like Jim Chee and LT.
Joyce Rucker
This author captures the area, its weather, its culture and builds his characters within a strong plot interweaving all of these factors into an amazing story.
MIke. freeman
This book is no exception, its well written and keeps my attention to the very end .
Michael Delozier

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 24, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
So far, The Dark Wind is the only one of Tony Hillerman's novels to make it to the big screen, and while the movie is good, the book is even better. Jim Chee of the Navajo Tribal Police is up against drug runners and running into too many dead bodies in this murder mystery set on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona. Set against the back drop of the land dispute between the Hopi and Navajo, The Dark Wind explores Indian cultures and values as the mystery unfolds. And for the first time in Hillerman's series of Navajo murder mysteries, the reader meets Hopi police officer, Deputy "Cowboy" Dashee, the perfect foil for Jim Chee. This is one of Hillerman's best!
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
very little closure.
I've read this book twice now, and I would have to say that it is definitely one of Hillerman's better ones. I love the way Hillerman has characterized Chee with very simple sentences, reminiscent of Hemingway. They make Chee seem like a very uncomplicated, spiritual man, and a very thoughtful person. His verbal responses to some of the people in the book show his cleverness, especially when addressing the Hopi from the Fog Clan, but also show how guarded he can be in his responses. He's a very intelligent man, not your average cop, who is good at tracking and can read impressions left in the ground. To be expected, Chee also takes the tales told by his elders very, very seriously.
I also thought it was interesting to see a glimmer of prejudice from the Hopi people towards Chee. This was something different and a bit unexpected, but from a logical standpoint it makes sense. The Navajo and Hopi people have been enemies long before there were white men who wanted to settle the area.
As I understand it, Hillerman has been praised for his portrayal of Navajo culture. I would think that, if he were making the whole thing up, he would be denounced instead. I found one review here almost bordering on insulting. It seems to me that Hillerman has either done as much research as he could (and that's not hard to do, considering that the Navajoes are the largest population group of Indians left in America--there's an anthropology joke that goes something like "A Navajo family consists of a father, a mother, two children and an anthropologist") or had friends that could give him the information he needs. Hillerman has skillfully woven what he knows into this book.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By ROBERT KINGSLEY on March 17, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Tony Hillerman wrote another winner in The Dark Wind! The mystery unfolds in an exciting manner that keeps the reader on the edge of his or her seat. Hillerman's excellent descriptions of the southwest places you directly in the beautiful land, and his feel for the cultures of the Hopi and Navajo bring to life the people of this region.
The story brings the reader to the conflicting lives of drug runners, DEA agents, thieves, the practioners of the Hopi religion, and white people living with the Hopi and Navajo. Jim Chee as the main character struggles with these conflicts as he tries to solve concurrent mysterys involving murders and missing drug shipments as well as seemingly petty thefts. Constantly in danger, Chee unravels the connections as he dodges those who would do him harm.
On a personal note - I have been reading the Hillerman mysterys in the order they were written and have enjoyed the development of Hillerman as an author. Each tale becomes more exciting and suspenseful. It is a very fun way to read Hillerman and I would recommend to anyone to read the books in this manner.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By bernie HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 25, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Enemies unseen... Fears unspoken... A dark wind has entered his soul"

Navajo Tribal Police Sgt. Jim Chee seems to be batting zero; so far, he has not been able to solve a series of seemingly unrelated crimes. In an area, that was joint use land between the Navaho and the Hopi (now Hopi) Sgt Jim Chee is given the task of finding the vandal that keeps destroying a windmill placed there to make Hopi life easer. He hears an airplane landing in the dark of night with no lights. The plane crashes and leaves a dying pilot. Also a dead man sitting up against a rock with a note in his hand saying if you want it back contact...

Sgt Chee is told that it is probably drugs and federal jurisdiction. Chee is not supposed to go anywhere near or have anything to do with the case. He has his own problems with the mill, a missing thief, and a mysterious ritual death. Naturally, he listens, and cannot help it if they overlap.

One of the reasons for reading Hillerman's books maybe more important than the overlying mystery is the descriptions of the area and the Ways of the Navaho and Hopi. Hillerman suggests you also read "The Book of the Hopi" by Frank Waters.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Orrin C. Judd VINE VOICE on July 11, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The great pleasure of Tony Hillerman's series of police procedurals--featuring Sgt. Jim Chee and/or Lt. Joe Leaphorn of the Navajo Tribal Police--lies not in details of procedure, nor cleverness of the puzzle to be solved, nor in particularly interesting characters. Many other series do these things better. What Hillerman really excels at is bringing alive a region of the country, the Four Corners in the Southwest, and an unfamiliar social milieu, the American Indian reservation. His writing evokes the rugged beauty and utter desolation of desert and mesa, and his descriptions of Navajo (and, in this novel, Hopi) religious beliefs and tribal customs portray a truly fascinating culture.
In Dark Wind, Chee must try to solve several cases : the fatal crash of a drug-running airplane; a jewel robbery; and the repeated sabotaging of a local windmill. They turn out, predictably, to be interrelated, and the conclusion is fairly pro forma. But then there's the almost incidental insight into Chee's way of thinking, when he's talking to the sister of the pilot who died in the crash :
'Do you understand "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth"?'
'I've heard it,' Chee said.
'Don't you believe in justice? Don't you believe that things need to be evened up?'
Chee shrugged. 'Why not?' he said. As a matter of fact, the concept seemed as strange to him as the idea that someone with money would steal had seemed to Mrs. Musket. Someone who violated basic laws of behavior and harmed you was, by Navajo definition, 'out of control.' The 'dark wind' had entered him and destroyed his judgment. One avoided such persons, and worried about them, and was pleased if they were cured of the temporary insanity and returned again to hozro.
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