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The Day Leo Said I Hate You! Hardcover – September 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 1
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (September 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316065803
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316065801
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,092,637 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. PreSchool-Grade 1—In this companion to When Sophie Gets Angry—Really, Really Angry… (Scholastic, 1999), Harris's wisdom and sense of humor regarding early childhood behavior complement Bang's depictions of a little boy's strong emotions. Vivid colors, scanned and digitally manipulated paper cutouts and photographs, and fonts of varied sizes portray the tension between a preoccupied mother and her bored youngster. Leo rolls tomatoes in the house until they burst, drops string beans into the fish bowl, and squeezes toothpaste all over the toilet, collecting maternal "no's" as he goes. Ultimately pushed off the page by a fiery, life-size negation, the boy enters his bedroom, declares it a no-rule zone, and takes out his frustration by coloring a frowning mommy on his wall. The confrontation builds as she ignores his dictate, and Leo utters the fateful phrase. The tiny boy in the next spread is a picture of remorse and regret. The denouement offers a realistic and loving dialogue that should be required reading in parenting and anger-management classes. Mom takes a deep breath, eventually gets a grip, and together they talk about when it is and isn't acceptable to verbalize this four-letter word. Children will delight in the realism of the collage elements (cloud-covered sheets, shaggy stuffed animals, exploding broccoli spears) and relate to the intensity of the scenes in which Leo struggles with his rage and lack of power. It may dawn on parents that sometimes playing is better than getting another thing done.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library
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From Booklist

The gentle analytic quality of such nonfiction Harris classics as It’s Perfectly Normal (1994) gives way to a series of emotional jolts in this raucous and cathartic story about the three little words able to drum up uncomfortable feelings in any family: I hate you. Leo is having one of those days when his mom says no to everything he wants to do, no matter how much fun it is (“No rolling tomatoes across the floor!”). After being sent to his room and yelled at for drawing a mean picture on his wall, Leo unleashes the dreaded curse in a vibrant two-page centerpiece dominated by “I hate you!” in Bang’s raging, scribbling, cut-and-paste style. The illustrations satisfyingly mirror the text after this point, using gloomy colors and isolating perspectives to show how Leo and his mom deal with the anger, shame, and fear that ensue.  Both parents and children will find comfort here; we all say things we don’t mean, and Harris knows that there are another three little words that can help make it all better. Grades K-3. --Daniel Kraus

Customer Reviews

So the theme of the book is to be respectful to each and one another and to be friendly.
Megan Bernard
Molly Bang's own bright and scribbled illustrations underscore the emotions conveyed by the story, and Leo's own drawings are used as an element of the story as well.
Jennifer Donovan
And it seems like it would be a good beginning to help him start understanding that his words can be hurtful.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michaela Beagen on April 30, 2014
Format: Paperback
The word "hate" is written in this book so many times, your child will be repeating the word in no time. This book is completely unhelpful. Luckily, I read it for a child discipline class... to myself.

Amazon, even your 1 star rating says "I hate it". C'mon!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Donovan TOP 1000 REVIEWER on February 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This story will resonate with older preschoolers and mothers alike. Children get frustrated with rules and disappointments and as they learn to manage their feelings and their words, sometimes they let those not-so-nice three little words fly, "I hate you!"

Molly Bang's own bright and scribbled illustrations underscore the emotions conveyed by the story, and Leo's own drawings are used as an element of the story as well. I think it's a great way to open a conversation (or simply let the story teach without further pressing the issue).
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Format: Hardcover
Leo's mother was always saying no. No, no, no, NO! She said that when he rolled tomatoes across the floor. Splat, one hit the wall! She said that when he put string beans in the fish bowl. Plop! She said that when he danced on the table and again when he squeezed toothpaste all over the toilet seat and down into the bowl. "Mommy, no more no's! I HATE no! His mommy explained to him that there were some things he was going to do that would make her say no, but there were some things he "should not do." Well, Leo got very angry and went to his room.

He got out his crayons and started to draw a mean old picture of his mean old mommy on the wall. He even "made her mouth turn down" and "made her hair stick way up in the air." He was still drawing when all of a sudden his mean old mommy came into the room and began saying that awful word NO again. He started yelling at his mommy saying things like she couldn't say that word in his room and he demanded that she leave. She didn't. All of a sudden Leo said something that shocked them . . . "I HATE YOU!" Oh, my! Leo had done something just awful to his mommy! What on Earth could he do now?

This is a story that will resonate with every parent or caretaker. This behavior is not at all uncommon and although unacceptable, a child needs to know that he or she is loved in spite of the unfortunate incident. Each individual handles this "crisis" in his or her own way, but a book like this is comforting. The art work is colorful and brings the emotional impact of this type of incident to life. This is the perfect book for any parent or caretaker . . . especially if you have heard "those other three words!"
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Format: Hardcover
Leo is so tired of Mommy's NOs that he retreats to his room just to be in a no NO zone. He quickly finds that there's no such thing when Mommy walks in and tosses yet another NO Leo's way. This is when Leo decides to throw his own verbal weapon at Mommy.

This is a book all kids can relate to, as it puts anger, temper, fear, and doubt on display. Facing off with overwhelming emotion can be a challenge, and it's comforting for kids to know that others find the struggle just as difficult.

The illustrations, which blend paper cutouts and photographs, are just as kid-friendly as the text. They include lots of movement and color to liven things up. Simple line meets rich texture on each page and words are uniquely highlighted throughout the book.

This is a book that will stay on my shelf for a lot of re-reading and enjoyment.

Reviewed by: Julie M. Prince
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is great for parents and teachers.
My students were engaged completely. I have read this to almost every class I've taught. We all love it.
Leo and his mom share a great day and lesson.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My class loved this book. They identified with Leo and wished they could push words back. They loved the illustrations and the story held their attention. I read the book many times!
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