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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on October 2, 2011
As a one time children's librarian and media specialist, issue books can often be great for a child to read on their own but less enjoyable to share with a whole group. I remember the frustration of trying to read a book to a whole class to address a specific topic and the boring story, artificial children, or a text simply not designed for reading aloud.

How often I wished for a book that was a good story and reflected real children as it communicated a value. This delightful new book by author Donalisa Hensley and illustrator Sarah Harkey, is both. The story chronicles a day when two sisters of different ages cannot decide on a way to play together because they each want their own way. At the lunch table with Mom and Dad, Mom guides the girls into thinking of ways to solve their own problem.

The Day No One Played Together communicates in clear kid-friendly language about the concept of compromise and does so within the frame work of a meaningful story kids will not just tolerant but enjoy!

The artwork is soft but strong and clear without being too cute and recognizes the growing diversity of the homes of the 21st century in its depiction of a multiracial family group. Strongly recommended for kindergarten through third or fourth grade collections for storytime or family reading. Book review, Child Sized Stories [...])
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on September 26, 2011
As a public school teacher and a therapist, I often find myself questioning how children in this era of techonolgy are learning to navigate interpersonal relationships.... At the heart of the story, is the valuable lesson of how compromise is both necessary and beneficial. Ms. Helsley presents this lesson of compromise in a manner that not only helps parents facilitate a discussion about the importance of positive social interaction, but also does so in a manner that the children will enjoy!~~Marjorie Simon, MSW, Public School Teacher.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on September 30, 2011
The Day No One Played Together illustrates the value of compromise and its function in an everyday relationship. The author conveys the importance of compromise in a clear and simple story that is easily comprehended and relatable for the intended audience. I will definitely have my children read this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on September 29, 2011
The Day No One Played Together: A Story About Compromise

This is a wonderful story about compromise. Two sisters who don't play together until they learn the meaning of COMPROMISE. Sisters Jadyn and Genesis (I absolutely love these names) are home together on
a beautiful sunny day. They cannot find a way to play together. This is a true to life situation faced by all parents. This story is a quick and easy way to explain compromise to children. It should be read to
children by a parent or teacher.
Told in a beautiful manner. Wonderful illustrations. This book belongs in every daycare, preschool and kindergarten. I know some adults who may benefit from this story, as well! Very well written. 5 stars!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on October 5, 2011
I really enjoyed The Day No One Played Together, by Donalisa Helsley. It's great because it is fun to read while also teaching kids about compromise. This is such an important lesson for kids to learn, but it can be very difficult to teach! In fact, some people never really learn the art of compromise, as we all know. Imagine if more people understood this from an early age--the world might be a much better place! I know from experience that many kids stop paying attention as soon as they think you are about to try to teach them something, but this book makes it interesting and presents the idea from a kid's point of view, so they can totally relate. It allows them to see how compromising benefits them and does not come across as being a "lesson;" instead, it is an entertaining and engrossing story. I am already reading it to my 10-month-old son and he loves to listen and point to the different characters. I know we will be reading and enjoying this book together for years to come!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2012
Wow, I love books. As a teacher in special education, the book has to quickly engage the child, and maintain that focus. This book did just that. There is a lesson involved, and it is directly introduced to the students. As a class we were able to make several lessons plans from the story. One was the included vocabulary, another was having the children role play the activity and carry the lesson over to the classroom, and playground.. Thanks Donalisa for the wonderful story.. I can't wait until your next book... The drawings were so cute..
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Even though this story deals with siblings, the conflict the girls experience is one that is played out in early childhood classrooms on a routine basis. This is a great story for early childhood educators to introduce the topic of compromise and how to be a good friend. I am adding this title to my bibliotherapy resource list.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
On a summer's day Jadyn and Genesis decide to play outside. The problem is, they can't decide on what they want to do and start to disagree. Soon they are both not having any fun. They then tell their mother that they are bored and that there is nothing to do. Their mom decides to teach them about how to compromise. The girls then are happy and have a great time. This book has a simple plot but it teaches an invaluable lesson. Sometimes you can get what you want and make other people happy too.

~The Rebecca Review
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 28, 2011
Sisters Jadyn and Genesis want to play, but they can't decide what they should do on such a beautiful summer day. Each has a great idea but they don't want to play what the other wants. So they end up playing alone and it is, frankly, no fun. They try all morning to find something they can do together, but to no avail. It's not until their mom teaches them about the concept of compromise that they discover a valuable lesson. By working together to incorporate both of their ideas, they will be able to play together, have lots of fun and make each other happy as only sisters should.

Reading this book brought back some memories that I haven't thought of in a very long time. I remember playing with my neighbor friend and hearing her say that if I didn't want to play what she wanted, she was going to go home. There was no compromising in her world. Oh how I wish this book was written back then. It probably would have done wonders for our friendship!

I love picture books, and the illustrations inside The Day No One Played by Donalisa Helsley are beautiful. The facial expressions are portrayed in such a way that you can feel every emotion that Jadyn and Genesis are feeling. I remember feeling like them a time or two when I was a child.

Learning about the value of compromise at a young age will give siblings the opportunity to see just how important it is to work together. Every family should have this book in their library and refer to it often as it is a book that can definitely be read more than once! However, the value of compromise taught in this book should not be limited to families. The message is universal and can easily be relatable in the classroom. That is why I believe this is a not only a great teaching aid for parents but for educators as well. Reiterating the concept in both settings will go a long way in teaching children how to be successful in all aspects of life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 27, 2011
"The Day No One Played Together" by Donalisa Helsley, is a story about learning to share, cooperate and compromise with one another. The two main characters, Jadyn and Genesis, are two sisters who have decided to play together on a beautiful summer day. Deciding to play together, however, was the easiest part of their day, as they soon realize their ideas for what to play seriously differ! Arguments ensue when Genesis wants to play in the dollhouse but Jadyn wants to play in the sandbox and again when Jadyn wants to play rock band but Genesis wants to play dolls. Out of frustration the two girls start to give up, until they learn the magical word "compromise" from their mom and then the fun really begins!

Donalisa has written a great story about a realistic situation that takes place in every household with siblings and every daycare and school, and in doing so, she has turned it into a fun lesson learned. Sarah Harkey's illustrations are colourful, charming and include unique borders on each page that add a special something to the entire book. An additional benefit of this book is the "New Words Definitions" page at the end, which lists three words that might be new to the readers' vocabulary. This makes for a great book for teachers who use word walls in the classroom and for children who are starting to read on their own. I look forward to reading more books in this series and am excited at the idea of the New Words Definitions in each book!

This book is a wonderful addition to any home and school library and will inevitably teach kids about the benefits of compromise, and how playtime can be much sweeter when everyone has a say in how to play.
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