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The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth Paperback – March 1, 1992


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The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth + The Sacred Mushroom and The Cross: A study of the nature and origins of Christianity within the fertility cults of the ancient Near East + Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 278 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; Rev Sub edition (March 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879757574
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879757571
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #544,802 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

67 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Whomever on April 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
One of the most fascinating books I've ever read.

I definitely give this book a 5 star rating.

I spent 9 months of the last year researching Allegro's personal history, communicating with his family, etc., verifying accusations against Allegro, and investigating the personal history of those, like John Strugnell, who spent their lives in attempt to destroy Allegro's career. I've spent 12 years researching this field in total.

John goes deep into pre-Christian Essene/gnostic history, and shows us how the fanatical Essene political leader the 'Teacher of Righteousness' was applied the attributes of more ancient theology such as astrotheology and shamanism/drug use talked about in our own research (search Pharmacratic Inquisition for a free demo video). From this "Teacher of Righteousness" we begin to see a three tear system of the current pervading religious dogma, and how, like ancient kings, the Teacher of Righteousness, who died in 88 BCE, was considered holy because he was closest to god's word, the semen and drugs, and labeled the anointed "Christ."

Quote:

"Essene or Essenoi or Essaoioi means `physician'.

Although the name `Essene' was known only in its transliterated Greek forms, Essenoi, or Essaioi, there seemed good reason to believe it represented an Aramaic, ie Semitic, word meaning `Physician' (`asa', plural `asayya'), and reflected the popular idea that these pious people, like Jesus and his followers, exercised power of demons, an essential part of folk-medicine.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Frank Rella on June 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
This study is much more convincingly presented than the author's reputation would lead one to expect. Of course Allegro's reputation was ruined by the Sacred Mushroom and the Cross which, except for the basic thesis itself, and it's quite a thesis, is much more sober and scholarly than the so-called critics would have us believe. Here Allegro tries to be more restrained, although the earlier book actually contains more interesting and useful data on the cultic credos of the 1st b.c. <> 1st a.d. period. As for his conclusion, if there is one here, Allegro's suggestion that Essenic sects played a role in the Jesus narratives, and that pagan myths were assimilated to the Christ doctrines, is not really very original or untenable. In fact, reverend scholars such as Powell Davies were making the same points in the fifties, and in the benighted nineteenth century the Reverend Taylor's Diegesis, written while in an English prison for his views, made the same connections although he of course knew nothing whatever of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
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120 of 144 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have read many books about Christianity and Jesus historic discussion; besides that I watch every Tv program that discusses this time of history. I read the portuguese translation of this book. Well, I have to say that this is, probably, the best book I ever read on the subject. Allegro became a largely polemic historian when he spoke about his theory that the New Testament episodes were evoked by mushrooms' consumption and not by real events. Unlike Kersten, Messadié and other polemical authors, John Allegro doesn't fall in just an easy speculation completely without logic and strong historical evidence. No, Allegro knows deeply the religious background of the Essenians and other Near-East cults. He can so easily describe the rituals and beliefs of those strange gnostic movements that one feels like we're actually reliving those past times with them: the reader can see the Ancient World through the eyes and words of John Allegro. Although, the majority of historians believe that Jesus really existed, even if some of the events written in the New Testament may have not happened like that, there is one thing that must be stated: we found no strong proof of Jesus existence to this day. There is no record of Jesus from his age. The original Gospels were only written some 40 or 50 years after Jesus death and may have been badly translated by the posterior Gentile christians: we can read only the remains of the greek Gospels and never the originals (if there were any real originals). The 1st century roman and jewish historians don't know anything of importance about Jesus, even though they knew of the Christian movement.Read more ›
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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 1997
Format: Paperback
When John Allegro first characterized Christianity as the normalized, dogmatized spinoff of an ancient Levantine psylocybin cult, some demonized him, some laughed and some followed him into the darkness where drug mysticism and mainline religion can coexist.

A thousand critics poking at his every word discredited Allegro.

But is it not a logical phallacy to assume that because a person is wrong once, ever wrong shall he be?

As a student of Christian origins, I find it extremely valuable to read the writing of a scholar who begins study from the premise "Jesus did not exist" precisely because for most of us, the opposite premise is taken.

The parallels between the Qumran cult's "Teacher of Righteousness" and the Jesus figure need to be examined from more than one perspective. As is often the case, the truth here may lie somewhere between the opposing conclusions.

This is one of those works from which many will gain value by synthesizing its ideas with others. Is it unreasonable to conclude a kind of Davidian enhancement to the Jesus legend? That Jewish patriarchal typecasting has something to do with the story? That strains of the messianic spirituality nurtured at Qumran made their way into the early Church?

The historical evidence for Jesus, not to mention his cultural momentum, weighs heavily on Allegro's insistence on his non-existence. But we shouldn't let him be crushed. He's a useful Devil's advocate, if nothing more
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