The Deadline: A Novel About Project Management and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $1.25 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -bearbooks-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: USED book, some wear from reading and creases. Qualifies for PRIME and FREE SHIPPING!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Deadline: A Novel About Project Management Paperback – July 1, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0932633392 ISBN-10: 0932633390

Buy New
Price: $23.70
20 New from $22.50 48 Used from $0.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.70
$22.50 $0.98
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Deadline: A Novel About Project Management + Waltzing With Bears: Managing Risk on Software Projects
Price for both: $50.25

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Dorset House (July 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0932633390
  • ISBN-13: 978-0932633392
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #70,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Tom DeMarco is the author of thirteen books, including novels, business books and a collection of short stories. He began his career as a software engineer at Bell Telephone Laboratories, working on what was then the world's largest computer. His focus began early to turn toward writing, with stops along the way in organizational design, litigation consulting, foreign affairs, and even a stint teaching undergraduate Ethics at the University of Maine. He lives with his wife, Sally Smyth, in the village of Camden on the coast of Maine.

Customer Reviews

It's fun reading this book.
nagarjuna
Tompkins is made an offer he can't refuse to take the roll of project manager of a seemingly un-doable software development task.
Foster Bass
The difference between this book and anything else like it is that you'll actually WANT to read it.
Paul Vanderveen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Charles Ashbacher HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Like economics, the discipline of software development suffers from a weakness that prevents the resolution of competing theories, in that it is generally impossible to perform controlled experiments. It would take an extremely brave manager to ever try out two competing development theories by having two teams build the same product simultaneously. However, it is possible to borrow a technique from theoretical physics and perform thought experiments. Such an experiment would involve having more than one team develop the same product simultaneously, but using different techniques. That type of experiment is the premise of this novel.
The main character is a recent victim of downsizing who is kidnapped and taken to a formerly communist country where the educational level is high and the costs are low. Once there, he succumbs to his fantasies and agrees to perform the experiment of his dreams. With six products to build and a large staff of developers, he splits them into eighteen groups where each product is being built by three teams simultaneously. Each group of the three then uses a different development method. Throw in impossible deadlines and you have a microcosm of software development.
It would appear that such a premise would guarantee a boring book, but nothing could be further from the truth. The book is entertaining and enduring, as developers will recognize most of their development problems, albeit couched in somewhat unique circumstances. Many of the leading figures in the theory of software development management make cameo appearances, including a certain very rich man. The end result is a true stroke of genius that has somewhat of a surprise ending, but actually quite natural, given the current climate in the computer business.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By John Rotenstein on January 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you normally fall asleep while reading books about Project Management, give this one a try. Set in the form of a novel, the reader follows the experiences of a Project Manager charged with bringing home a series of project with typically impossible deadlines.
This is not a text book. If you're new to Project Management, I recommend that you start elsewhere. However, if you've been involved in projects or find yourself in the lucky position of being a Project Manager, this book provides some valuable ideas about how to improve your project -- or at least cope with inevitabilities.
If you enjoy this book, also look at "The Goal" by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox, and also "Zapp: The Lightening of Improvement" by William Byham.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Mr. Demarco's book is an easy, entertaining read. It can be consumed in an evening with very little effort. In the guise of the protagonist's diary entries, Demarco instructs the reader on the finer points of software project management. Humor and a cutting wit are two more of Demarco's strong points. There is more practical information in this little book than in any 10 textbooks on the subject. It is now a part of my library (if I can ever get it back - people keep borrowing it!).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brant Serxner on October 31, 2011
Format: Paperback
Our department just went through a downsizing and restacking (corporate speak for physical cubicle shuffling) and I found The Deadline among the old pens and Splenda packets in an empty cube. I remember that it made quite a stir when it came out, so I took it back to my cloth lined slice of heaven, now removed from any actual chance of any physical view of heaven, and read it.
I enjoyed skimming through this book and tend to agree with most of the points the author makes. However, as a veteran Project Manager, I think the book will be misleading to a novice and most of it better be old hat to one with any real experience. The target audience should be managers of Project Managers and their managers, and customers of Project Management efforts. But they won't like it, as it either ignores them, or disparages them. This is a real weakness. The core knowledge imparted, for professionals in PM, is better addressed in books like The Mythical Man Month and The Psychology of Computer Programming, among others.
The author embeds his instruction in a modern Fairy Tale that is breezy and entertaining, and superficial. The plot structure is really just a tongue in cheek device, bordering on facetious, to set up some straw men the author uses to get his points across, which is OK. The underlying message is a dismissal and distrust of the received wisdom of methodologies and systems of Project Management and the management of organizations, in favor of a loosely described team based approach supported by rigorous design. Not a bad perspective to work from, and fresher when the book came out, but never as all encompassing a panacea as the author makes it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By ms8@acsu.buffalo.edu on March 27, 1998
Format: Paperback
I can not thank you enough for writing this book. The content of the book was not only completetly relevant but so insightful into a topic (sw project management) that is grossly ignored by many people who are in charge of large projects and groups of developers. My experience (7 yrs as a developer) has been that experienced programmers end up "managing" projects. The problem is that they have spent their time developing software and do not seem to know anything about managing a project. The Deadline addressed the important issues of software project management head on by presenting problems to be solved and ways of solving them not just with ideas by specific methods. Not only did I appreciate the material but the format of the book may it enjoyable to read. For a software developer who is starting to realize how much more there is to software development than wich language you know this book is a necessity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews