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The Death of Competition: Leadership and Strategy in the Age of Business Ecosystems Paperback – April 11, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (April 11, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887308503
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887308505
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.2 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,162,281 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Total system leadership, according to business strategy consultant James F. Moore, has replaced mere product superiority and even complete industry dominance as today's corporate brass ring. In The Death of Competition: Leadership & Strategy In the Age of Business Ecosystems, he uses "biological ecology" as a metaphor for the new type of cooperative/competitive relationships that he believes lead to that brass ring -- while guiding readers toward the unique interlocking networks that he says are necessary to attain it. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The president of GeoPartners Research, Inc., a Cambridge, Massachusetts, management consulting firm specializing in business strategy and implementation, Moore was impressed and influenced by anthropologist Gregory Bateson during his doctoral study at Harvard and here continues Bateson's thoughts on coevolution, culture, and competition. Moore believes that thinking in terms of traditional industries is no longer acceptable business strategy. He forecasts the death of competition as it is now known and predicts a future of organized chaos. Using the "ecosystem" as a metaphor, he encourages business and business leadership to coevolve into whatever patterns or relationships are needed at particular times to succeed. His business ecosystem is divided into four stages, which he illustrates with corporate examples and ultimately relates to personal ecosystems. His well-developed work deserves the attention of public and academic libraries and executives in all types of business.
Littleton M. Maxwell, Business Information Ctr., Univ. of Richmond, Va.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lee Amon on May 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In The Death of Competition, James Moore asks us to reconsider the way we think about business at the most basic level. In this thought provoking analysis, Moore takes us from the Hawaiian Islands to the jungles of Costa Rica, and from war torn Mogadishu to the boardrooms of Wal-Mart and Intel. Clearly this is a book that goes far beyond the standard boundaries of a "business" book.
Moore tells us that we need to consider our business as being part of an "ecosystem". Whereas the value chain would encompass suppliers and distributors, the ecosystem is much broader. Members of the ecosystem may sell complimentary products, after sales services, or other products and services that are vital to the overall customer experience. Even when considering the members of the value chain, Moore tells us to think in terms of the ecosystem, and look for ways of making the connections deeper, stronger, and more to our advantage. Among other examples, Moore shows us how Wal-Mart, by forging relationships with suppliers that are much closer than the classic manufacturer-retailer relationship, has positioned itself at the center of an ecosystem that is stable and strong. In another section, he compares the way that Intel fostered an ecosystem around the Pentium line of microprocessors, and how the diversity and strength of this ecosystem kept other "ecosystems" such as Apple and Next, from encroaching. He also showed how Apple made it more difficult for other members of its ecosystem to co-evolve, making the entire Apple centered ecosystem weaker.
The central theme of the book is that business ecosystems, like biological ecosystems, evolve.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book illustrates that leadership, like good ideas are lasting. I am encouraged that the ideas about leadership that Jim Moore is presenting have the staying power to make it into the hands of our leaders. As a college professor, I was very impressed when Vice President Al Gore recently referred to this book as an example of business leadership and the American pioneering spirit. The comparisson to the pioneering aspect of the Internet and todays business transition is very appropriate. After listening to Al Gore and reading the book, I think that he actually read it. Normally politicians will only refer to something on the best seller list and employ superficial quotes from the most recent Sunday paper promos.
After reading this book, I found it to be thoughtfull, clear and more appropriate today than when it was originally published.
This book is worth the read for non-business and business leaders alike. I hope other leaders read this book as well.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
The ecosystem approach to analyzing industries described by Moore is powerful. My friends managing high tech companies have used Moore's concepts and approachs to great success, particularly in changing and converging environments. Companies must learn to co-evolve and cooperate. This book tells you how.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Today's buisness environment needs leadership. There are many well studied reports about the changing face of competition -- but few are able to integrate them with the leaders that Mr. Moore uses in his examples. The author has done a great job of presenting the "state-of-the-union" of the competition-cooperation landscape with his biology metaphore. He has done an outstanding job of illustrating the quality and nature of the leaders who led their companies through the various stages he describes. This book is worth reading and re-reading for leaders and leader wannabees.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 1996
Format: Hardcover
Drawing an analogy between the ecosystem and the business environment, the author provides an insight into how businesses should cope with the ever evolving and changing business environments. The text cites examples of how successful companies define or help shape their "ecosystems" and subsequently gain competitive advantage
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1996
Format: Hardcover
Moore uses the metaphor of a "business ecosystem" to make sense of our complex and chaotic business landscape. He demonstrates how managers who think about "coevolving" with customers and suppliers can shape and capitalize on the rich opportunities that fluid business environments afford. Complete with analytical tools, illustrative case studies, and inspiring sections on leadership, this book could push the idea of alliance-based competition into widespread practice
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