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The Death of WCW: WrestleCrap and Figure Four Weekly Present . . . [Kindle Edition]

R. D. Reynolds , Bryan Alvarez
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Behind-the-scenes interviews, rare photos, and probing questions illustrate with humor and candor how greed, egotism, and bad business shattered World Championship Wrestling. 50 photos, 20 in full color.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"A must-read for fans who want to be taken behind the scenes."  —New York Daily News


"A history book that anyone who has an interest in professional wrestling should read."  —epinions.com


"The exhilaration created by the dueling companies comes alive on the pages."  —Wrestling Observer Newlsetter

About the Author

R. D. Reynolds is the author of WrestleCrap: The Very Worst of Pro Wrestling and the creator of WrestleCrap.com. He lives in Indianapolis, Indiana. Bryan Alvarez is the editor of the Figure Four Weekly newsletter, which has covered pro wrestling and mixed martial arts since 1995. He is a writer for WrestlingObserver.com, cohost of the Wrestling Observer Live radio show on Sports Byline USA, and former columnist for Penthouse. He is an independent pro wrestler. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Product Details

  • File Size: 5208 KB
  • Print Length: 240 pages
  • Publisher: ECW Press (November 1, 2004)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001Q9EEMY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #279,447 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
55 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Story of WCW's Amazing Rise & Fall January 6, 2005
Format:Paperback
I've been reading Bryan Alvarez' column now for quite some time and he is one of the most respected people covering pro wrestling today. Along with R.D. Reynolds they tell the story of the remarkable Rise & Fall and eventual Death of WCW. Relive some of the classic moments as WCW began its increidble rise from a second rate wrestling company who once gave us Robocop in the ring, to the juggernaut that nearly did the unthinkable: Nearly putting Vince McMahon and the WWF out of business.

Through interviews with many of the stars and other participants we'll see how WCW used the WWFs long-time strategy of raiding its rivals talent rosters as they systematically stole nearly every major star that the WWF had in the 80's and early 90's: Hogan, Savage, Nash, SCott Hall, Bret Hart, Ted DiBiase, Sean Waltman, the Nasty Boys, Ultimate Warrior, and more. The eventual "turning" of Hulk Hogan and the creation of the NWO led to WCW winning the Monday Night ratings war with the WWF for over 80 consecutive weeks.

Riding high, WCW will soon collapse under its own weight. Soon, big, guaranteed contracts given to wrestlers take their toll on WCWs budget as guys like Nash, Hogan, Hall, and Hart would be injured for months at a time. WCW leaked money like a sieve, tossing about millions to bring in celebrities like Dennis Rodman, Jay Leno, and Karl Malone, and trying to make wrestlers out of people like Jerry Only of the Misfits.

Meanwhile egos clashed as the powerbrokers like Bischoff, Hogan, and Nash controlled everything and kept younger wrestlers down. Fights backstage and no advancement would eventually lead many younger stars like Chris jehrico, Chris Benoit, and Eddie Guerrero to jump ship to the WWF.

Small cracks became large fissures.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable read, but badly sourced January 1, 2008
Format:Paperback
This is a tough review to write. On the one hand, I enjoyed this book immensely. It was a fun trip down memory lane reviewing all the twists and turns of the Monday Night Wars in terrific detail. In fact, this is probably the most detailed book you'll find out there about this period. The authors also have a wonderful sense of humor, and the book is a quick and fun read.

What immensely frustrated me, however, was that almost no effort was made to provide sources for the voluminous amounts of information presented. While there is a very short bibliography at the end of the book listing a handful of sources organized by chapter (which probably do not account for most of the information in the book), no indication is given as to which pieces of information came from which source. To me, this is a major issue because the wrestling industry is rife with unfounded internet rumors, and it's important for the reader to be able to distinguish documented facts from unfounded rumors or speculation.

For example, the authors make numerous allegations about WCW's financial status at different points throughout its history with no citations or any other indications as to where this information purportedly came from. In his book, "Controversy Creates Cash," Eric Bischoff lamented the fact that internet writers often made unfounded and inaccurate claims about WCW's profits and losses since the company's information was proprietary and was allegedly unavailable to anybody outside of WCW. Of course, Bischoff could be lying through his teeth, but there's no way to tell (at least from this book) because Alvarez and Reynolds give us no way to determine where their figures came from.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A very mixed bag October 24, 2010
By Dave M
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I'll get the good stuff out of the way. As someone who was big into wrestling during the "glory days" of 1997-2000, this book does provide outsiders with a rather comprehensive view of the havok that was going on down at Atlanta. If you were big into the "behind the scenes" stuff during that time and was big into insider wrestling news sites, then this book won't tell you much more that you didn't already know. For the unitiated and newer fans (which basically makes up about 80% of WWE's current fan base) this is a good way to learn about the fall of WCW, and how a company with so much going for it screwed up so royally. Finally, I ended up getting the Kindle version and it did have Text to Speech enabled, which I always enjoy.

I did have a number of beefs with this book, mainly pertaining to how it was written. For one, and this may be a personal thing, but I like my non-fiction books to have a serious tone with a strong sense of neutrality and not giving unwanted opinions. This book has very clear tones in it to the point where it starts to get annoying at times. I don't care for a book that gives opinions of how good a match was (saying things like Match A sucked, Match B sucked, which are totally subjective) nor do I think it's right for them to criticize the Undertaker/DDP angle by saying that DDP's real wife was hot while Undertaker's wife was a "Horse Face." Just tell me the story and let me form my own opinions.

Speaking of opinions, there's no real reason to read the last chapter of this book, as it is just a long diatribe of how the WWF screwed up (in their opinion) the WCW/ECW invasion angle. It comes across as very fanboyish and something that a 16 year old wrestling fan with too much free time on their hands would write.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars I love it
fun book for wrestling fans, highlights just where the wcw went wrong in their war with the wwf.
Published 2 days ago by JamieSmyth
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and better writing than expected
Surprisingly well-written, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in the Monday Night Wars era in general and/or WCW in particular. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start
got slow midway through. kinda have to wonder if Vince commissioned this book. Of course there was a lot of applying pistol to foot in WCW.
Published 2 months ago by Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars great book
a griping good read i just couldent put it down if ur a big wcw or just a fan of wrestling i would consider this book
Published 3 months ago by jose andres gallegos
5.0 out of 5 stars A lesson that we all need to take to heart.
"The Death of WCW" is, of course, about the irresistible rise and fall of World Championship Wrestling - which, in a story to rival the best of Greek tragedies, improbably... Read more
Published 3 months ago by Ravi P. Rajkumar
5.0 out of 5 stars A warning not heeded.....
Although I read this book years ago, I thought I'd deliver a modern review since its being re-released in a "10th anniversary" edition. Read more
Published 4 months ago by imafunker2
3.0 out of 5 stars Great detail on Nitro/Raw Episodes and PPV Booking, Horrendous...
This book was great in its coverage of the Monday night wars and the detail on specific Raw/Nitro booking and also the pay per view booking from that era. Read more
Published 5 months ago by R. Kol
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read
excellent recap of the events that led to the death of wcw. I'd definitely recommend to any wrestling fan. I would say the viewpoint was overly negative, maybe on purpose.
Published 5 months ago by markb
3.0 out of 5 stars An important story that needed to be told.
It was a little surreal when I logged onto wwf.com in early 2001 and saw a gigantic headline that read "WWF. Purchases. WCW. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Jeff Ferguson
5.0 out of 5 stars Spectacular Read
This book is a must read for any wrestling fan. It gives a very detailed picture of just how sad the fall of one once great company took place.
Published 8 months ago by Trey Cox
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