Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ELIGIBLE FOR *FREE* SUPER SAVER SHIPPING. AMAZON CUSTOMER SERVICE WITH DELIVERY TRACKING. Book may have moderate wear to corners and edges. CD may or may not be included. Could be ex-library.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Deceiver Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1992


See all 46 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.99
$2.99 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$2.73

There is a newer edition of this item:

Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Deceiver + The Fist of God + The Fourth Protocol
Price for all three: $23.17

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (June 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553297422
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553297423
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.3 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Forsyth's stalwart tribute to the spies who came in from the cold: four thriller-novellas featuring the intrigues of British superagent Sam McCready. With the cold war over, the Foreign Office has decided to retire its veteran spies, beginning with McCready, the ``deceiver''--head of Britain's disinformation desk since 1983. McCready balks, demanding a hearing at which his assistant relates four of McCready's most daring exploits. The first and longest, ``Pride and Extreme Prejudice,'' is at once the most suspenseful and melancholic. Here, McCready, having ``turned'' a top Russian general, sends spy-pal Bruno Morenz into East Germany to accept the Russian's latest gift--the Soviet Army War Book; but, unknown to McCready, Morenz has just killed a cheating mistress and is cracking up. When the East Germans catch on to Morenz, who panics into hiding, McCready must sneak across the Iron Curtain, find Morenz, retrieve the book, and deal--irrevocably--with his friend. Also subtly shaded with the grays of spydom is ``The Price of the Bride,'' in which McCready learns from a pro-West Soviet source that the CIA's new prize, defecting KGB colonel Pyotr Orlov, is actually a double agent bent on falsely implicating a top CIA-man as a Soviet mole. It's a masterful spy-vs.-spy battle of wits as McCready sets out to unmask the Russian and save the marked Yank. Less enthralling but still offering solid action and brilliant local color are the two final tales, with McCready acting pivotal but minor roles as he displays his prowess against non-Soviet threats. In ``A Casualty of War,'' he foils an IRA-Qaddafi gun- running scheme, while in the semi-humorous ``A Little Bit of Sunshine,'' he foils a Cuban takeover of a Caribbean island. Not a sizzler like The Day of the Jackal or even The Negotiator (1989) but more resonant than either, with shades of le Carr‚ and Deighton: sophisticated, shrewd, roundly satisfying spy- stuff. (Book-of-the-Month Split Main Selection for November) -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Fans will not be disappointed" The Times "Another Forsyth thriller that has you by the throat with plots so finely crafted as to make the cold war's very darkness visible" Daily Mail "Cleverly constructed ... very readable" Mail on Sunday --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Frederick Forsyth is the author of fifteen novels and short-story collections. He lives in England.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
21
4 star
22
3 star
7
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 50 customer reviews
Would recommend anybody who enjoy spy thrillers to read this book.
alexander
The first one is amazing spycraft, the second one is pretty good, but the third one just bored me and I couldn't finish it.
Ken C.
This book had everything- suspense, action, psychological thrills, and clever plot twists.
buddyhead

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By John G. Hilliard on April 11, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Not a bad little page-turner. First off the structure of the book is four stories that all have one character placed in each one. It was fun to explore how the author does it. I liked the different story lines; most of them have been done before, but not this well or with this type of structure. The book sneaks up on you and really sucks you in. You find your self almost hurrying to the next page because the suspense builds through to the end of each of the stories. Very good characters with competent development and well thought out roles within the story. I would have liked a bit more detail on the locations. Overall, this is a good old spy novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By buddyhead on January 25, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book had everything- suspense, action, psychological thrills, and clever plot twists. And, to boot, there are four stories that each are independent of the other, yet are interwoven in that they trace career highlights of the Deceiver.
Forsyth's attention to detail is startling in light of the complexity of the stories he tells. He is one of the few espionage-slash-action writers I can stomach, because his style is so vivid and clean. This book is excellent and is every bit as good as Jackal and Odessa File.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Antônio on May 17, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book comprises four short stories featuring spymaster Sam McCready.
Story #1 is a masterpiece of action; your heartbeat will confirm this as you turn page after page avidly. The way McCready has to kill the very friend he is there to save is pure drama. One of the best compositions by Forsyth ever -- teachers should assign it for children to read at school.
Story #2 is the state-of-the-art of psychological twist. Until the last page you will not know who is telling the truth or lying. Thank you Fred.
Story #3 does not take after the two previous ones; it is good but not as gripping as those are. You will not let unnoticed the vast research job Forsyth has done to describe places and situations in such a detailed manner. ...
Story #4 -- Forsyth not in his best; he was actually having a bad day.
Because of its fluent prose and intricate plots, I can recommend “The Deceiver” -- a really worthwhile book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rozman Junaidi on August 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've read a few spy novel by other authors, but this one has to be the best I've read to date. It's interesting how Forsyth managed to blend in the character of Sam Mcgeedy in all the four sub stories in one book. Particularly my favourite is the first two stories which involves a phony russian defections and Sam Mcgreedy involvement in a 'cross border exchange gone wrong' in Berlin. Highly intense!
The detail of the story on how the procedure are done in the intelligence community prooves his thorough research on the book. This is rewarded by an overwhelming attachment and sense of realism from the reader. It is really difficult to put this book down, once you started it. Highly recommended for those who seek realism and detailed process in espionage action story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J R Zullo on September 27, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Forsyth has written some of the best spy-thrillers, in an universe filled with LeCarrés, Folletts, Deightons and so on. His earlier books, such as "The day of the Jackal" and "The Odessa file" are simply marvelous pieces of research and storytelling. This book, "The Deceiver", portraits what happens to a british spy when the Cold War is over: his superiors are trying to give him an early retirement, since he's no use in these peaceful days. Maybe Forsyth wrote the story ( I mean, the four stories ), thinking what was going to happen to HIM, and other writers alike, since their primary plot in the real world was shattered altogether with the Berlim Wall. And I guess Forsyth wasn't that much worried. The first story is the heaviest one, with a psychological side. As the book goes on, you get to know the hero, MacCready, not only as a spymaster, but mainly as a person, an individual. The last story is the best one, in a mood that resembles the Agatha Christie's Poirot's detective cases. Highly recommended to people who want to learn more about Forsyth himself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amitav Mukherjee on May 1, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first two stories in this compilation of episodes from the colorful career of one Sam Mcready a.k.a "The Deceiver" are worth their weight in gold. The first one deals with a thrilling infiltration into East Germany with a variety of twists and turns. The second story details the defection of a senior KGB officer who creates a rift between the British MI6 and the CIA. The final two stories are more run-of-the-mill, but Forsyth fans will not be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By john purcell on November 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Frederick Forsyth has penned a most unusual collection of spy tales here. In fact four episodes from the colorful career of Sam McCready, British spy master, are provided and well-crafted. The four tales cover about 10 years and every terrorist and criminal hub in the world, including Libya, Cuba, USSR, the IRA, and East Germany.

McCready has been deemed expendable, due to his unorthodox and outrageous tactics, in a post Cold War era by very high level political and civil service leaders.

The typical story line for a prehistoric cold war operative runs like this: Operate a high level Russian spy for many years in an uneasy collaboration with the CIA. Send an overweight, aged, hard drinking West German spy into East Germany to collect a package. With the help of retired smugglers, go yourself into East Germany to retrieve the package when the West German suffers a complete break-down. Of course this needs to be done without any official sanction from the British or West German, while the KGB is also on the trail of the Russian general. Clearly these tactics have no place in the post cold war 1990's, a time of seeming safety and tranquility at least until Iraq invades Kuwait in August 1990.

The fundamental premise here is that McCready has a legal right to a deparmental hearing as a sort of protest of his forced retirement. In the hearing the four spy tales are told. This is a very unusual construct and may not appeal to all. The tales are all good, but not good enough to stand alone as Forsyth novels, and are strangely unrelated, other than that they are four cases successfully solved by our hero. This is also a book for those like me, who love the technical minutae and operational details of the covert trade.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?