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68 of 74 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How to......models
This small sized book (173 pages) covers a set of models that could fall under decision making tools (if you use a broad spectrum for that definition that is).

The models get placed under 4 basic questions:
1) How to improve yourself
2) How to understand yourself
3) How to understand others better
4) How to improve others

Some...
Published on January 27, 2012 by Caufrier Frederic

versus
25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unrealized Expectations
To be fair, my two-star rating may be overly harsh based on your different expectations of the book.

In working with CEOs and management teams, a well-developed graphic model often spurs creative thoughts that lead to new insights and solutions. Graphic frameworks also lead to clearer interaction and more engagement. The subtitle "50 Models for Strategic...
Published on September 2, 2012 by Robert G. Barker


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68 of 74 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How to......models, January 27, 2012
This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
This small sized book (173 pages) covers a set of models that could fall under decision making tools (if you use a broad spectrum for that definition that is).

The models get placed under 4 basic questions:
1) How to improve yourself
2) How to understand yourself
3) How to understand others better
4) How to improve others

Some models are well known and broadly used, some are lesser known, some disappoint and some are nice surprises.

This book is a very fast read and really stripped down to the basics. The models are explained in single page format, followed up with an illustration. So as long as you don't expect detailed explanations on the models, you will love this one.

Interesting!

Contents

Instruction for use

How to improve yourself
- The Eisenhower matrix: How to work more efficiently
- The SWOT analysis: How to find the right solution
- The BCG box: How to evaluate costs and benefits
- The project portfolio matrix: How to maintain an overview
- The John Whitmore model: Am I pursuing the right goal?
- The rubber band model: How to deal with a dilemma
- The feedback model: Dealing with other's people's compliments and criticism
- The family tree model: The contacts you should maintain
- The morphological box and SCAMPER: Why you have to be structured to be creative
- The Esquire gift model: How much to spend on gifts
- The consequences model: Why it is important to make decisions promptly
- The conflict resolution model: How to resolve a conflict elegantly
- The crossroads model: So what next?

How to understand yourself
- The flow model: What makes you happy?
- The Johari window: What others know about you
- The cognitive dissonance model: Why people smoke when they know it's unhealthy
- The music matrix: What your taste in music says about you
- The unimaginable model: What do you believe in that you cannot prove?
- The Uffe Elbaek model: How to get to know yourself
- The fashion model: How we dress
- The energy model: Are you living in the here and now?
- The SuperMemo model: How to remember everything you have ever learned
- The political compass: What political parties stand for (UK model)
- The personal performance model: How to recognize whether you should change your job
- The making-of model: To determine your future, first understand your past
- The personal potential trap: Why it is better not to expect anything
- The hype cycle: how to identify the next big thing
- The subtle signals model: What your friends say about you
- The superficial knowledge model: Everything you don't need to know

How to understand others better
- The Swiss cheese model: How mistakes happen
- The Maslow pyramids: What you actually need, what you actually want
- Thinking outside the box: How to come up with brilliant ideas
- The Sinus Milieu and Bourdieu models: Where you belong
- The double-loop learning model: How to learn from your mistakes
- The AI model: What kind of discussion type are you?
- The small-world model: How small the world actually is
- The Pareto principle: Why 80 per cent of the output is achieved with 20 per cent of the input
- The long-tail model: How the internet is transforming the economy
- The Monte Carlo simulation: Why we can only approximate a definitive outcome
- The black swan model: Why your experiences don't make you any wiser
- The chasm - the diffusion model: Why everybody has an iPod
- The black box model: Why faith is replacing knowledge
- The status model: How to recognize a winner
- The prisoner's dilemma: When is it worth trusting someone?

How to improve others
- The Drexler-Sibbet team performance model: How to turn a group into a team
- The team model: Is your team up to the job?
- The gap-in-the-market model: How to recognize a bankable idea
- The Hersey-Blanchard model (situational leadership): how to successfully manage your employees
- The role-playing model: How to change your own point of view
- The result optimization model: Why the printer always breaks down just before a deadline
- The world's next top model

Now it is your turn
- Drawing lesson 1
- Drawing lesson 2
- My models

Appendix
- Bibliography
- Illustration credits
- Final note
- Thanks
- The authors
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An unusual and helpful survey, February 29, 2012
This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
Stumbled on this little book at the MIT Coop. I've been an analyst and strategic thinker for 25+ years, but have never seen a survey like this that covers so much territory so succinctly. It's a great overview to lots of the common conceptual frameworks used by decision analysts. It's not going to tell you enough to employ most of these techniques, but it does have enough info to point the user towards the right kind of tools for various kinds of problems. Just flipping through it as you contemplate a challenging problem should get neurons firing. My only criticism is that a lot of the examples are drawn from personal decisions, as opposed to corporate or pol-mil examples. Many of these models are applicable to those areas as well (or in fact were invented in those spheres).
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unrealized Expectations, September 2, 2012
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This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
To be fair, my two-star rating may be overly harsh based on your different expectations of the book.

In working with CEOs and management teams, a well-developed graphic model often spurs creative thoughts that lead to new insights and solutions. Graphic frameworks also lead to clearer interaction and more engagement. The subtitle "50 Models for Strategic Thinking" sounded directly applicable to my management consulting. What I hoped to find were good examples and expositions of proven frameworks, along with new frameworks not yet encountered.

What I found instead were models mostly concerned with personal growth, and much of the writing was superficial. The section on Festinger's cognitive dissonance theory, for example, exhibited a shallow understanding of its key points. Writing on the well-understood and useful SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis failed to identify influences as internal versus external, and helpful versus harmful. The graphic in the Wikipedia definition of SWOT is better, suggesting that the authors spent very little time researching their work.

Finally, to their credit, the authors encourage the reader to develop his/her own models. Sadly, though, the advice they offer is so imprecise and elementary as to be useless.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Concise and Excellent as Reference, March 2, 2011
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This review is from: Decision Book (Hardcover)
The book is very concise and presents all the topics and concepts in an executive fashion.
Even though it has a good coverage, it is not recommended for those who are not familiar with Strategy Concepts as SWOT, BCG, and others. Very good for a quick review though.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Weak Focus and Poor Execution, February 26, 2014
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I felt that this book had a lot of filler in the form of mostly useless decision analysis models. While it is true that some of the models are useful, many of them are simply inapplicable to most situations. I felt like this book should have been called "Wikipedia compilation of pop theories."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, August 5, 2013
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This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
I expected more depth and professional approach to the subject. Though interesting models included, further explanation and applications would have been better.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Meh, December 27, 2013
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This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
A lot of information of many decision models. None of which are explained in any depth to be useful. Perhaps you might look through it for some inspiration and then search for further information on that model. Not something you would read cover to cover. Disappointing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good but Limited Book, July 10, 2013
The Decision Book by Mikael Krogerus and Roman Tschappeler presents a concise and useful set of models for a variety of circumstances. Clear explanations accompany elegant diagrams in describing the overall models. The models are placed into four categories: Improve Oneself, Know Oneself, Know Others, and Improve Others. All of the models, regardless of what category they belong to, claim to help us make decisions in uncertain situations.

The authors' purpose in this book is to aid decision-making and reflection, in both individual and collaborative contexts. The authors' state that a model must have the following attributes:

(1) simplifies
(2) is pragmatic
(3) summarizes
(4) is visual
(5) organizes
(6) is a method

These models help clarify and structure uncertain situations. The authors reinforce this point at the end of the work, when they state that (a) pictures are easy for the audience to follow, and (b) models rely heavily on pictures to convey a lot of information. This leads naturally to the conclusion that models are a particularly effective way of communicating methods of action.

If this book seeks to help us make better decisions, I think it partially fulfills that goal. There is, however, no advice on how to deploy the models; the book is simply a reference book for various methods and not a book that shows the reader how to truly integrate these models into their thinking. That kind of knowledge may only arise from a trial and error application of the models to real life situations.

Another shortfall I can easily elucidate is the weakness of the models from the categories about understanding and improving others relative to the models about self-improvement or self-knowledge. The models about self-improvement and self-knowledge are more susceptible to experimental feedback than the other models. Some of the models from the know/understand others section seem merely descriptive (The Status-Model, The Small World Model) as opposed to proactive methods that help form constructive questions.

If you are looking for a slim reference book of models, then this book fulfills that purpose. If you are looking for a deep understanding of the models within the book, or an education in how to use models effectively, this book falls somewhat short.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thanks for writing it!, January 10, 2014
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This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
The author includes models from different sources, writing a short summary of each. It’s a good starting point for further research on these topics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very short, February 2, 2013
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This review is from: The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking (Hardcover)
Very short explanation of how to use the models, how to interpret them and how to use them.
Need a lot more tips of wich model to use in what kind of situations.
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The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking
The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking by Mikael Krogerus (Hardcover - January 30, 2012)
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