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The Deer Leap Mass Market Paperback – Print, October 1, 1986


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Mass Market Paperback, Print, October 1, 1986
$26.00 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Dell; Reissue edition (October 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440119383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440119388
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,479,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This is the seventh crime novel by Grimes, an American who writes wih assurance on the exploits of Scotland Yard's Richard Jury and his titled friend Malcolm Plant. They meet at The Deer Leap, a pub in Ashdown Dean where people and pets have been dying "accidentally." Plant focuses his attentions on a solitary, 15-year-old girl who calls herself Carrie Fleet. She's an amnesiac, rescued from London lowlifes who had found the child and were using her to collect government money for her support. Carrie's unlikely savior is a baroness, living on drunken fantasies in the decayed splendor of her late husband's estate. In an isolated corner of the grounds, Carrie maintains a sanctuary for abused animals. Her zealous care makes her a suspect in the destruction of the local fox-hunting headquarters, but Jury casts his net elsewhere. In the last act of the witty and deeply moving drama, retribution for heinous crime is exacted. Here gentle Plant plays a role so utterly unexpected that readers will feel its impact for a long time. November 26
Copyright 1985 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Charm and energy...A brilliantly interwoven multiple narrative."—Time



"[A] witty and deeply moving drama...Readers will feel its impact for a long time."—Publishers Weekly



"Read one of [her novels] and you'll want to read them all."—Chicago Tribune



"One of the most fascinating mystery writers today."—Houston Chronicle

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Martha Grimes is the bestselling author of twenty-one Richard Jury novels, as well as the novels Dakota and Foul Matter, among others. Her previous two Jury books, The Old Wine Shades and Dust, both appeared on the New York Times bestseller list.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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The novel has a dark ending which was not really necessary to the plot.
Fred Camfield
Despite this, this is a poignant, rather unfinished story about a child who seems to belong to no one and have no past and has given herself to protecting animals.
Martha E. Nelson
I am addicted to the Richard Jury mysteries by Martha Grimes, and the Deer Leap is another great one, although it is a sad one, too.
Denise A. Tucker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am very much a fan of Martha Grimes; but in this offering, she loses the battle when trying to balance her sparkling, dry humor and an almost depressing sullenness. I don't want to ruin the book for anyone, but the ending leaves us completely drained emotionally. I am a big fan of Ms. Grimes and have read most of the Jury novels. I am not one to always expect a "storybook" ending; but the resolution of this one is decidedly dark (even Melrose Plant does something totally out of character). I would rate this the weakest entry of the 10 or so that I have read so far, although it is still superior to most current books of the same genre.
My advice is not to read this one if you are feeling blue and want a pick me up!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on October 9, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This seventh outing for Detective Superintendent Richard Jury of Scotland Yard CID and his recently un-titled friend, Melrose Plant, seems a little confused in its plot and in the back-story of the characters. An adolescent girl with amnesia and a predilection for needy animals has been taken in by a widowed baroness in a small town who has a fondness for gin. Polly Praed, semi-successful mystery novelist and longtime friend of Plant, has a dead body fall on her out of a call box in the village during a rain storm. And there's been a rash of pet deaths, plus a couple of humans. All this somehow brings Jury down from London (not very realistic, that) and the plot, as they say, thickens. The conversations are witty, the characterizations deft, but Grimes has always been good at those; it's the storyline itself that needs work. And I was frustrated by the equivocal events on the very last page; what finally happened to the girl, for pete's sake? Well, at least Plant finally has a reason for carrying a sword cane.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Fred Camfield on July 2, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of the main problems I have with Martha Grimes is that she uses references to things peculiar to England without really explaining them. In this novel she has a side plot about fox hunting with references to details that the readers have to figure out for themselves. Perhaps readers in the UK are more familiar with the issues. This is compounded by the repetition of some plot material from one novel to another.

There are young children running about who do not seem to be in school, some of them exploited by their parents (a cook in an inn, a dog watcher in London). One has to wonder, expecially when an Inspector from Scotland Yard is on the scene. Does the country have no child welfare?

The novel does have its moments. Inspector Jury meets his new upstairs neighbor, Carole-ann Palutski, who figures into following plots. Carole-ann is a 19 year old bombshell who can look 30 if the occasion calls for it. Fool that he is, Jury fends off Carole-ann's advances because he considers her too young. Instead he becomes involved with an older woman which almost leads to his death.

The novel has a dark ending which was not really necessary to the plot. I guess the author has a fixation on tragedies (kill the good people along with the bad. Let God sort them out).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MacGeezer on November 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
what started out as one of Grime's best, very interesting characters, is completely spoiled by one of the worst endings in contemporary mystery writing; in one page Plant kills a woman unnecessarily, the "good" character dies (?), and about five subplots are left hanging; this is the worst Grimes even conceived
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Martha E. Nelson on April 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is one of Martha Grimes' early Richard Jury novels, where some of the characters are almost stereotypical and not quite real--sometimes these early novels seem to me to be played out against cardboard sets in my mind. Despite this, this is a poignant, rather unfinished story about a child who seems to belong to no one and have no past and has given herself to protecting animals. Not even Richard Jury is able to protect Carrie Flood, and this is parinfully sad.
One of the fun things about this novel is the introduction of Carole-ann, definitely a mutilayered character, and to see the development of Mrs. Wasserman.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 16, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a great fan of Ms. Grimes' Richard Jury series, but I must say this is my least favorite of the bunch. I guess my only real reservation is the graphic descriptions of how animals are abused and killed by the most sadistic of predators: Man.
Plot-wise, "The Deer Leap" is a worthy as any book in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By B. Judell on December 28, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Totally dissatisfying. The structure is infuriating. The characters half-baked. The ending unbelievably thrown on. Ms. Grimes must have written this book in quite a rush. Since this is the first Grimes mystery I have ever read, I can only assume from her reviews that she can write a fine mystery, but I certainly won't delve into any of the others. A work this inadequately concocted is hard to forgive. What's amazing though is that this book was published in 1985 when publishing houses still had editors. If so, someone was a sleep at the wheel. I can't believe how angry I am at the moment for having wasted my precious time on such tripe. If I hadn't read an e-book version of the text, I would now be tearing out the pages and setting them aflame within my fireplace—and following that up with a war dance. A more befitting title would be "A Deer's Heap."
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