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The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It Kindle Edition

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Length: 122 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 1540 KB
  • Print Length: 122 pages
  • Publication Date: May 23, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00850HTHO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #119,900 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 45 people found the following review helpful By David Whittinghill on June 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book is an entertaining enough read, but I am not entirely convinced as to the authors' characterization of the problem and their recommended solution. I do however think they are on to something with their idea that pornography and video games can be regarded by some as preferable to real experiences with real people. I think they have identified a real phenomena. I take issue though with the notion that it is pornography and video games, per se, that are the only things at issue. My own sense is that their gripe is similar to Nicholas Carr's observations in his book, The Shallows, in that people when presented with too much digital titillation and distraction are intellectually and emotionally blunted (a valid observation, I would say). My suspicion then is that video games and pornography are simply two examples of the titillation and distraction endemic to digital culture identified by Carr (i.e., others include social media, partisan news, cat falling off the table videos, etc). Zumbardo and Duncan's thesis, by focusing their criticism too narrowly miss an opportunity to slay a larger dragon.

One other criticism. The introductory pages with the data from the TED survey was less than useless. Beyond the fact that the selection bias when sampling from TED survey respondents would make the results almost idiosynchratic, the questions asked of the respondents were just silly. Why do I care what a TED user's beliefs are about why such and such phenomena is happening? Am I to assume the average TED user is a trained sociologist and her or his insights have some sort of added heft? If they were asked to what extent they themselves played games, viewed porn, etc., that would be different.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rafal Kozlowski on October 30, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I will review this book as a simple reader, not a scientist.

First of all it is really well written. The message the authors are advocating flows smoothly. I don't find anything that contradicts its logic. I was expecting more rather opinion-based moralizing after reading all the 1-star reviews. However, I haven't found that in the book. I enjoyed reading it, although the authors' conclusions are not funny at all.

I don't run surveys or any other scientific research on the book's subject matter and I can't prove that the statistics are right or not. I can only say that the outcome of the surveys presented in the book confirms my observation. I mean I know a lot of women who can't find a normal guy (I don't mean "the right guy"). In most cases they meet the kind of guys who can't be bothered about maintaining a relationship.

I even know a guy who decided to leave his girlfriend for computer games (I don't know what other stuff he was enjoying in his room). At a point he had to borrow some money to live off and was unable to give it back. His lender organized a job for him. The guy paid the debt after two weeks, quit the job and immersed himself in the virtual world again.

I believe the problems depicted in "The Demise of Guys" are global. I have never been to the US, but I think the book is quite relevant in other countries I have been living in: Poland, the UK and lately Australia.

This book is important for me as a relatively new father. The content wasn't surprising for me at all. It just reminds me about the direction I'm trying to give to my son's upbringing.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By CMC on August 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
The authors of this book have well identified an undeniable issue that is more pervasive than many recognize or are willing to admit. This book does a direct service to any gaming and presumably `adult male' who reads it, by articulating the phenomenon encountered by young males growing up in the technology driven society of today.

It is not hard to find young males in my own life that experience the very problems that Dr. Zimbardo and Duncan illustrate. I think this book speaks to any male willing to accept that he is indeed facing this dilemma or someone in his life that can speak to him in honest dialogue about getting through this (potential) phase. The overuse (a key element that I see many commenter's overlook in their reviews of the book) of porn and video games is an easy answer to a question that looms larger and larger in a male's development: what am I going to do and how am I going to get there? The overwhelming component, for young males, to both questions is the social interactions required to answer both questions, personally and professionally. Thereby, returning themselves back to the dimly lit room, alone.

It seems from some of the reviewers that they did not read the book (some admittedly) and others that did not have a favorable review missed key details in their criticisms. A few have mentioned the flawed surveys and the sample bias from TED users. While the sample is biased to people on, the fact still remains (as cited in the book) that 75% of TED respondents where males and 50% of those males were aged 18-25. As such, I fail to see how being a TED user negates one's socio-sexual concepts of self and external relations of the core audience of this phenomenon.
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