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The Desert Smells Like Rain: A Naturalist in O'odham Country Paperback – April 1, 2002


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Paperback, April 1, 2002
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The Desert Smells Like Rain: A Naturalist in O'odham Country + Cultural Anthropology: The Human Challenge, 13th Edition
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 148 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press (April 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816522499
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816522491
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #234,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“People often find science boring and ill written. Not in this book. Here the reader is lured into botany, ethnology, hydrology, and a couple of million acres by vivid writing, good pictures, and a beautifully produced book. . . . Anyone ignorant of the desert should begin their cure here.” —Tucson Citizen“The humor, spice, charm, insight, and compassion with which Gary Paul Nabhan weaves his tale make for enjoyable reading.” —Rio Grande Sun“Nabhan's point is that we transplanted desert dwellers have a great deal to learn from longtime, environmentally conscious inhabitants if we are not to destroy our fragile home. . . . A remarkably humane essay on nature and respect for it.” —Bloomsbury Review“The Desert Smells Like Rain offers a remarkable insight, sensitive but unsentimental, combining the sound perceptions of a scientist with ecological concerns, matching humor and a sense of human frailty with tentative hope for the future.” —High Country News“His eyes are those of a scientist, his prose and vision a poet's: spare, evocative, respectful of both facts and mysteries.” —Orion Nature Quarterly

About the Author

A MacArthur Fellow and recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Conservation Biology, Gary Paul Nabhan is Director of the Center for Sustainable Environments at Northern Arizona University.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Frank M. Morales on February 16, 2008
My wife and I found it interesting how the Tohono O'odham used rainfall alone to successfully subsist in the desert. We were also fascinated with the knowledge and use of herbs to maintain their physical well-being and to ward off disease. We found some of the folk tales amusing. Having lived in the Tucson area, we found we could identify with the book. We thoroughly enjoyed it. The author did an excellent job of capturing the essence of the Tohono O'odham (Papago) culture and lifestyle.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By ernest schusky on February 9, 2013
Nabhan gives us two perspectives on the O'odham. First, his training as a botanist exposes us to the O'odham use of wild species, both plant and animal. He also introduces us to ecology of the desert by showing how human use of an oasis interacts with its use by birds, providing details on population numbers and species. As a bonus he analyzes how the O'odham diet may relate to their diabetes.
Second, he gives us a brief introduction to O'odham ethnography, and readers will find his description of the O'odham wine drinking (fertility) ceremony interesting although I would have appreciated his setting of the ritual in its larger context i.e. Mexico.
Although the ceremony today is rare, or kept secret, it was common in the 1950s. For a fictional account of one based on numerous ethnographic accounts see, IN SAGUARO'S SHADOW.
ernestschusky.com
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My favorite Nabhan book, as a desert grasslands dweller, just the title spurs my imagination.
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