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The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products (paperback) Paperback – June 18, 2005


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The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products (paperback) + Creating Breakthrough Products: Revealing the Secrets that Drive Global Innovation (2nd Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: FT Press; 1 edition (June 18, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0132776200
  • ISBN-13: 978-0132776202
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,748,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The iPod is a harbinger of a revolution in product design: innovation that targets customer emotion, self-image, and fantasy, not just product function. Read the hidden stories behind BodyMedia's SenseWear body monitor, Herman Miller's Mirra Chair, Swiffer's mops, OXO's potato peelers, Adidas' intelligent shoes, the new Ford F-150 pickup truck, and many other winning innovations. Meet the innovators, learning how they inspire and motivate their people, as they shepherd their visions through corporate bureaucracy to profitable reality.  The authors deconstruct the entire process of design innovation, showing how it really works, and how today's smartest companies are innovating more effectively than ever before.

About the Author

Craig M. Vogel is a professor in the School of Design and director of the Center for Design Research and Innovation in the college of Design Architecture, Art and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. He has developed an approach to design that integrates teaching and research. He has worked with a variety of companies as a consultant for new product development and strategic planning.

Jonathan Cagan, Ph.D., P.E., is a professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research, teaching, and extensive consulting focus on product development, strategic planning, and design. He has developed team-based tools and computer-based technologies to improve the process of design conceptualization.

Peter Boatwright, Ph.D., is associate professor of marketing in the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. His expertise and teaching focus on new product marketing, consumer marketing, and marketing research methods. In his research, Professor Boatwright has developed new statistical methods, as well as additional theories of consumer behavior.

The authors have worked with a variety of companies, including, Procter & Gamble, International Truck and Engine, Respironics, Alcoa, Kennametal, New Balance, Kraft Foods, Motorola, Lubrizol, Ford, General Motors, Whirlpool, RedZone Robotics, DesignAdvance Systems, and Exxon Chemical.

Professors Cagan and Vogel are coauthors of the book Creating Breakthrough Products, which is a detailed approach to navigating the fuzzy front end of product development.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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The broad range of case studies offered in this book help.
Craig Matteson
They have been extremely helpful and supportive in letting us find out what makes them tick and what enables them to become one of the new breed of innovators.
Turgay BUGDACIGIL
Pragmatic Innovation - The New Mandate 3. the Art and Science of Business 4.
K. Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
In the Preface, the authors explain that their book "deconstructs innovation into understandable chunks that form a compelling argument of what innovation is, why it is important, and how [their reader] can begin to transform [herself or himself as well as her or his] company to meet the needs of the current marketplace." They focus their attention on those who are "at the heart of the innovation process." Throughout eleven chapters, they answer questions such as these:

1. What are the defining qualities and characteristics of "the new breed of innovator"?

2. Why is innovation `the only approach to differentiation"?

3. What does the process of innovation involve, indeed require?

4. How best to identify relevant and significant trends?

5. Then, how to respond to these trends as especially important opportunities?

6. How can (and should) innovation respond to human needs, interests, and even fantasies?

7. What is a "Powers of 10" analysis and why can its revelations be so valuable?

8. Why is B2B innovation the "new frontier of fantasy"?

9. How to plan and then implement a successful product development process?

10. How to establish and then nourish an innovation culture?

In the Epilogue, the authors review various "powers of innovation," reaffirming that those who comprise the "new breed" embrace the principles and ideas of pragmatic innovation: "an interdisciplinary collaboration, a structured process of exploration, a balance between art and science, [and] a focus on experience and fantasy." These are the otherwise ordinary people who will, together, "design the extraordinary things to come.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Craig Matteson HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 15, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Every company, whether large of small, faces greater competition than ever before. The huge increase in design schools, engineering schools, and business schools around the world promise that competition will become ever more fierce. Cost cutting alone will not get the job done because only one company in each segment can be the low cost producer. It is innovation that allows for many competitors and increased profits. That is why so many books and schools talk about innovation. However, it is very difficult to teach someone to be creative.

Many try to take a riskless and incremental approach to innovation and while that is better than the status quo it leaves one vulnerable to the competitions better efforts. However, the risk in wandering into more ambiguous areas of your business for innovation make management uncomfortable and if done wrong can lead to a swift demise. Hence, it is often avoided by successful companies. We have seen the automotive companies remove billions upon billions from their cost structure and they are still in trouble. It is finding innovation that customers will not only buy, but also pay MORE for that is the Holy Grail of modern business.

This book proposes what the authors call Pragmatic Innovation as a way to choose wisely which Grail you drink from. For them this is a form of innovation that includes interdisciplinary collaboration, a structured process of exploration, a balance between art and science, a focus on experimentation and fantasy, and to this I will add good luck. It is always that feel for how much line to let out and how much tension to use to reign in without things either breaking or getting away from you that make the difference. How can that be communicated? It certainly can't be put into a checklist.
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Format: Hardcover
If you're wondering what that object is on this book's cover, wonder no more. It's a walking toaster of course! Surely you want one.

That robot is a walking irony for this book's theme: Apply pragmatism to innovation. The alternative is innovation that amuses but doesn't sell.

I first heard the mantra of multidisciplinary teams for new product development in 1976 from Perdue's Mike Pessemier based on his pioneering research. I was surprised to see these authors argue so strenuously for the same thing. It seems like some lessons have to be relearned before they stick.

Of more novel significance are other aspects of this book:

1. The assertion that the next arena for intense competition that makes a difference will be in design rather than quality, production and delivery;

2. Seeing fantasy desires as being worthwhile needs to satisfy for even the most mundane, non-consumer goods;

3. Recognizing that multidisciplinary teams will work best if led by people who have multidisciplinary backgrounds, experiences and interests; and

4. Factor of 10 perspectives to help those involved see the bigger . . . and small pictures of who else is involved with a new product or service.

All the best books about new product development emphasize process, communication, understanding and adding new perspectives. The Design of Things to Come is a winner, too, in those departments.

Like all good books about product development, this one has lots of entertaining stories about interesting new offerings and how they were developed. Most of the examples were new to me or contained details I hadn't heard or read about before.
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