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The Development of Social Network Analysis: A Study in the Sociology of Science Paperback – July 23, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Empirical Press (July 23, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594577145
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594577147
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #922,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Linton C. Freeman, is a Research Professor in the Department of Sociology and in the Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He began working in social network analysis in 1958 when he directed a structural study of community decision-making in Syracuse, New York. In 1978 he founded the journal, Social Networks.

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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Roland Werner on October 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
The first impression after completing the book is that it is thorough in content, rich in detail, and well organized for summarizing the growth of the intellectual tradition that leads to today's elaboration of social network analysis.

Freeman develops an analytical model that he uses to analyze contributions from Compt (structuralist) to Wellman (unification) to the development of social network analysis. The four components of this model are:

"1. Social network analysis is motivated by a structural intuition based on ties linking social actors,

2. It is grounded in systematic empirical data,

3. It draws heavily on graphic imagery, and

4. It relies on the use of mathematical and/or computational models" (p. 3).

He finds that early structuralists contributed mostly at intuitive, empirical levels of analysis, leaving graphic representation and mathematical treatment to later generations. These early structuralists included Compt, Tönnies, Durkheim, Spencer, Cooley, LeBon, and Simmel. More systematic early contributions were made by Morgan, Macfarlane, Hobson, Calton, and Watson.

Freeman continues with the rise and decline of two schools of thought spearheaded in the 1930's by Moreno and lead by W. Lloyd Warner at Harvard. These schools began to contribute at the more formal graphic levels of analysis. After this period of awareness, in the Dark Ages (the '40s, '50s and '60s), twelve nearly independent schools of thought reemerged, blossomed for a time and then withered. They emerged both in parallel and in sequence. It was the Renaissance at Harvard led by Harrison C. White and his students who contributed to the diffusion of social network analysis by their academic moves and associations.
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Davor Jedlicka on February 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
Freeman's book, The Development of Social Network Analysis, brings hope for sociology. Much of sociological thought in recent years defies empirical verifications and mires in political correctness. Freeman shows what the mainstream intellectual discipline could be in sociology. For sociologists who consider their field a science, "the study of social structure has come of age." It is time to bring network concepts into the classroom starting with the introductory courses. Freeman deserves the highest accolades for bringing the imagination and credibility to sociological inquiry.

Davor Jedlicka, PhD.

Professor of Sociology

The University of Texas at Tyler
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