The Devil in Pew Number Seven and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.98 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by monarchbooksusa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Devil in Pew Number Seven Paperback – July 16, 2010


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.01
$6.07 $1.80


Frequently Bought Together

The Devil in Pew Number Seven + An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-Year-Old Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive, and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny
Price for both: $22.07

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale Momentum (July 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414326599
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414326597
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (549 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #176,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

“When the Lord gets ready for me to leave this church, He won’t send the message by the devil.” Robert Nichols, 1975

Rebecca never felt safe as a child.
In 1969, her father, Robert Nichols, moved with his family to Sellerstown, North Carolina, to serve as a pastor. There he found a small community eager to welcome him . . . with one exception. Glaring at him from pew number seven was a man obsessed with controlling the church and determined to get rid of anyone who stood in his way.
The first time the Nichols family received a harassing phone call, they dismissed it. The same went for the anonymous letter that threatened they’d leave “crawling or walking . . . dead or alive.” But what they couldn’t ignore was the strategy of terror their tormentor unleashed, more devastating and violent than they could have ever imagined. Refusing to be driven away, Rebecca’s father stood his ground until one night when an armed man walked into the family’s kitchen . . . and Rebecca’s life was shattered.
If anyone had reason to harbor hatred and seek personal revenge, it would be Rebecca. Yet The Devil in Pew Number Seven tells a different story. It is the amazing, true saga of relentless persecution, one family’s faith and courage in the face of it, and a daughter whose parents taught her the power of forgiveness.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This is the true story of Rebecca Nichols Alonzo and her family.
Eddie Gonzalez
We don't understand why things like this happen to good people, but we can definitely see God taking a bad situation and making something good come out of it.
Carolyn Woodard
That this family can forgive their tormentors is a wonderful example of God's love, grace and forgiveness to us.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

127 of 134 people found the following review helpful By Eddie Gonzalez on September 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
When my husband told me we would be receiving this book to review I was very excited and this book did not let me down. It had me from the very first page. In fact, I started it in the evening, read until 1:30 in the morning, got up at 6:30am to read some more and finished it by about 10am. It was that good.

Let me give you a little bit of info about the book and then I will tell you why you should definitely read it, too. This is the true story of Rebecca Nichols Alonzo and her family. She was born into a little community called Sellerstown. The book shares about about her parents' love story and travels as traveling preachers before she was born, but the main story mostly takes place at the Free Welcome Holiness Church in Sellerstown, North Carolina where her father took over as the pastor in 1969. A man that attended the church decided to make it his mission to terrorize the family until they left the church, as he had lost a lot of control over the congregation when Rebecca's dad came to town. He tried to accomplish this through numerous bombings of their house and church, threatening phone calls and mail, sniper fire and even trying to pay someone off to run the pastor down with a car. Throughout the entire story Rebecca's parents stand steadfast and instead of teaching their children to be fearful and hateful, they repeatedly encourage them to trust in the Lord and forgive their enemies.

I knew that I would like this book from the very beginning, but this book turned out to be so much more than I had even hoped it would be. This book truly addresses the issues that hold us back from forgiving, and the true toll that anger, bitterness, and lack of forgiveness can have on our own lives and walk with the Lord.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
76 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Rick Fess on August 13, 2011
Format: Audio CD
"Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse." The title of this book, and the preceding quote on the front cover, led me to believe that this was going to be a true story similar to "The Amityville Horror" and other "true stories" of demons and possession. I was shocked as I proceeded to read it that it IS a true story. You will have a hard time believing all the things that went on in a small town and how a minister and his family were terrorized in America in the 1970's. That is right - the 1970's...

The author, Rebecca Nichols Alonzo, relates the story of her childhood growing up in the town of Sellerstown, North Carolina. Her father, Robert Nichols, was a minister and he and his wife had moved to the community as he was to be the new pastor of The Free Welcome Holiness Church. Rebecca had not yet arrived on the scene as her mother was pregnant when they moved, and a brother Daniel would also join them later. A young family starting a new life in rural America would not normally provide any reason for a book to be written, however a Mr. H. J. Watts would make sure that their lives were anything but peaceful.

The anonymous phone calls to her parents started when Rebecca was only eighteen months old. The caller would threaten Mr. Nichols and then hang up. This was in 1971 when there was no such thing as caller ID, and even traces on phone calls were unusual and only used in extreme cases. Unfortunately it would get to that point, however much too late to help the Nichols' family. These phone calls continued for years, at all hours of the day and night, making it impossible for the family to relax and enjoy their home and community. There were also unsigned, anonymous letters sent to them, threatening harm if they did not leave the church and get out of town.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
47 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Margot S. Hausmann on July 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
Of the 50 or 60 books I collected at a recent book convention, this was my favorite. Don't miss it.

The dramatic and beautifully told story would have been enough, but this memoir is also GOOD FOR THE SOUL. It is for anyone who's ever needed to forgive someone. (And if you don't find yourself in that lot, you're just not paying attention.)

Pick up The Devil in Pew Number 7. You won't want to put it down.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Gene A. Reuter on October 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I RARELY REVIEW THINGS THAT I BUY BUT THIS BOOK IS GREAT. I'M A FORMER MARINE THAT MOSTLY READS SUPERNATURAL BOOKS BY KOONTZ. THIS BOOK IS NOTHING LIKE THAT.THE AUTHOR TELLS US OF HER HORRIFIC EARLY LIFE BUT REMAINS POSITIVE AND FORGIVING THROUGHOUT. THERE ARE BAD PEOPLE THAT DO BAD THINGS IN THE WORLD. THERE ARE ALSO BAD PEOPLE WHO WITNESS BAD THINGS BEING DONE TO OTHERS AND DO NOT ACT. UNFORTUNATELY THAT IS THE WORLD WE LIVE IN. THIS FAMILY'S ORDEAL SHOWS US THAT THERE ARE GOOD PEOPLE OUT THERE. IT ALSO GAVE ME HOPE THAT MAYBE GOOD CAN OVERCOME BAD. I LOVED THIS BOOK.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Esther King on August 29, 2010
Format: Paperback
Although this book started off slow to me:jumping from one part to another of her childhood events, once it finally settled down to narrative it was hard to put down. I should have known that when I saw my husband pick it up out of curiousity and then proceed to read it in one sitting.(Something he never does)

Rebecca Nichols Alonzo, and the author, Bob DeMoss do an excellent job of opening a window into the life of pastors and their families that few people ever see. From hate mail to bombs and guns, the violence is on a scale that most would find hard to believe in our America of religious tolerance. But this is not fiction: it chronicles real-life people with real-life anguish and real Heaven-ordained forgiveness.

Once you get into it, like my husband and I, you will not be able to put it down as you find the God of the Bible working His plan of grace and mercy in the lives of those involved. And even though it may not feel right, it may not not seem fair; it works together ultimately for the good of all those involved, and to bring glory to the God of Heaven.

The lessons on forgiveness and why it was so important to her to forgive at the end of the book are priceless by themselves. I recommend it.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews