Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$14.72
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express US
Add to Cart
$16.93
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • The Devil, Probably
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

The Devil, Probably


List Price: $24.95
Price: $14.93 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $10.02 (40%)
Only 7 left in stock.
Sold by Paint it Orange and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
14 new from $11.96 1 used from $22.25
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$14.93
$11.96 $22.25

Deal of the Day: Up to 42% off Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Seasons 1-5 on Blu-ray and DVD
Today only, save up to 42% on Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Seasons 1-5 on Blu-ray and DVD. The offer to own these collections ends December 24, 2014, 11:59 pm PST and while supplies last. Shop now


Frequently Bought Together

The Devil, Probably + Money ( L'Argent ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, PAL, Reg.2 Import - United Kingdom ] + Au Hasard Balthazar (The Criterion Collection)
Price for all three: $61.99

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Actors: Antoine Monnier, Tina Irissari, Henri de Maublanc, Laetitia Carcano, Nicolas Deguy
  • Directors: Robert Bresson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Olive Films
  • DVD Release Date: September 18, 2012
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008DL4K8Q
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #45,461 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Like many of the late films of Robert Bresson, The Devil, Probably is, as the title suggests, a dark story of disaffected French youth in modern Paris: four disillusioned young adults who wander city streets and hole up in tiny apartments while serving witness to society's destruction of the planet. Bresson described the work as "a film about the evils of money, a source of great evil in the world whether for unnecessary armaments or the senseless pollution of the environment." It may not be the bleakest film in his canon--the honors surely belong to his final work L'Argent--but it is certainly one of his most depressing. Charles, the womanizing ringleader of the group, is haunted by an overwhelming sense of nihilism that finally envelops him. Newsreel clips of ecological disasters and atomic destruction punctuate the film and the backdrop of a busy but cold, impersonal, mercenary Paris is Bresson's least flattering portrait of the city. But it is a beautiful film, and it's clear that Bresson has invested himself in its sad desperation. Nominated for the Golden Berlin Bear and winner of Silver Berlin Bear (Special Jury Prize) at the 1977 Berlin International Film Festival.

Customer Reviews

This film is unquestionably a five-star masterpiece, but be forewarned that this New Yorker release is EDITED.
Ara Corbett
Like most people, Charlie's friends are more pragmatic than he is and manage to make compromises but he simply can't adjust to such a flawed world.
thisnameisalive
Really, not much more need be said about this film other than that it is close to perfect and stays away from needless detail.
JAMES TRAVIS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ara Corbett on May 11, 2009
Format: VHS Tape
This film is unquestionably a five-star masterpiece, but be forewarned that this New Yorker release is EDITED. One notable omission occurs during the stock footage sequence of environmental destruction early in the film; the scene where the seal is clubbed to death has been cut out of this version, which of course sanitizes the horror of what Bresson is conveying about man's relationship to the world. Hoping Criterion will acquire the rights to this film as well as L'Argent, Four Nights of a Dreamer, Lancelot du Lac, Une Femme Douce, and A Man Escaped and give them all the deluxe treatment they deserve. Save your $$.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J from NY VINE VOICE on June 8, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
While "L'argent" and a number of Bresson's other films dance around the issue of the void and the consequent immunity of the lucid individual to any form of hope, "Le Diable" confronts it head on.
Charles, an apathetic, negative, yet somehow compelling young man walks around Paris with his 'friends' (he has no real contact with them) and searches, a bit lazily, for a meaning to live in a society which offers none. Horrific shots of environmental destruction and human deformities resulting from pollution give an added impact to the film.
In the end, however, Bresson's focus is Charles--his miserable and joyless hedonism, his situationisteque responses to the outside world's demand for him to 'act', and his seemingly unabating feelings of alienation and despair. The dry, realist tone of the film is Bresson's abrasive answer to our demand for drama in the questions of metaphysics Charles' unspeakingly proposes in his behavior. Bresson knows that in the actual world no one would care or give the time of day to a young man of Charles' age with these kind of questions. The paradox of the film is that Charles is an unsympathetic character in terms of his relations to others. And yet we have nothing but the utmost sympathy for his nihilistic (or not?) plight. The attractive leading actor is literally able to enact man's tenuous place in the universe with a few downward glances. Of course, all attempts to save Charles are in vain; he is looking for truth, which is nowhere to be found. He toys with suicide and in the end opts for a mercy killing via a junkie friend he has a strange empathy for.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By mto on July 10, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
With a cool, quiet narrative tone & an absence of any theatricality, Bresson presents a series of tableaux involving a group of young people who confront evidence of danger & evil in the world. The tone is of disaster & imminent disaster, without redemption. Whether in hollow words of politic rhetoric or psychiatry, or in images of ecological disaster: the destruction of forests & oceans, atomic annihilation. The central protagonist is a figure who is unable to conform his despair: Outside of society & social mores he articulates his alienation & his nihilism. As with other Bresson films, the protagonist ultimately loses himself & in doing so attains a state of "grace" through his passage of suffering & loss.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hiram Gomez Pardo HALL OF FAME on September 14, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
Charles is a modern day fallen Angel and his quartet of friends ,deeply immersed in protests and committed against the pollution of an industrialized consumer society. But nevertheless is far to be satisfied, the psychoanalysis, the church, the revolution do not work out as devices and soon he will make a desperate bargain with a junkie friend

May be this film can express a late homage to the French New Wave, but I think this is a simple title. Bresson ' s stature is quite difficult to entitle.

Bresson is Bresson, unique, masterful and sublime.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert Stiles on June 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Beautiful poem of being in the world and not knowing why, seeing evil and being powerless to respond. Like most of Bresson's later work (Lancelot, L'Argent), when the film ends it is a kick in the gut. Bresson just walks away.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Karl P. on June 20, 2014
Format: DVD
I'm giving this one star for the same reason the first reviewer did.
I was luckily able to see this (and every Bresson film at a retrospective years ago) and I can certify that New Yorker has excised scenes from this film, the obvious one being the baby seal clubbing during the scenes of environmental stock footage carnage. I remember it because it was the most shocking thing I'd seen! When I bought the VHS of this title on New Yorker, that scene was noticeable
excised. I can't think of anything more profane than a company "monkeying" with the very precise and specific structure and formula of a Bresson film! New Yorker should be ashamed. Sincerely!
I agree with the first poster, I'm hoping this and all of Bresson's color films get the "Criterion treatment". Save your cash buying this sinfully neutered version!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Paint it Orange Privacy Statement Paint it Orange Shipping Information Paint it Orange Returns & Exchanges