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133 of 171 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Drive-in horror without the drive-in
It's the 1970s all over again. If you're obsessed with the 1970s, like me, especially 70s drive-in classics, like me, The Devil's Rejects is a must-see. It's probably the closest thing to a 70s drive-in horror flick that's been made since the 70s. This is either a good or bad thing depending on your perspective. If you hate tasteless, gory, low-budget B-movies, then you...
Published on July 24, 2005 by FairiesWearBoots8272

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57 of 73 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Devil's Rejects on Blu-Ray? Seems standard to me
Devil's Rejects is amongst my favorite films, for it's great mix of humor, action/violence/gore, and character development. Most people looking at this review already know all about this movie.

The Picture on this movie doesn't seem to be all that much of an improvement. I've seen VAST differences on Blu-Rays vs DVD (Unforgiven especially!!!), and this movie...
Published on January 11, 2007 by Nate from Project-Blu


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133 of 171 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Drive-in horror without the drive-in, July 24, 2005
It's the 1970s all over again. If you're obsessed with the 1970s, like me, especially 70s drive-in classics, like me, The Devil's Rejects is a must-see. It's probably the closest thing to a 70s drive-in horror flick that's been made since the 70s. This is either a good or bad thing depending on your perspective. If you hate tasteless, gory, low-budget B-movies, then you would do well to skip The Devil's Rejects. If, however, you are passionate about Ford Administration-era low-budget flicks, then don't hesitate: see this movie.

The Devil's Rejects is Rob Zombie's spin-off/sequel to his 2003 directorial debut, House of 1000 Corpses. That film was famously dumped by its distributor, Universal Studios, and then picked up by Lion's Gate. Then upon release it was scathed by critics, but not surprisingly, managed to connect with a cult audience. Personally I found it to be the most sensational, joyous horror film I had seen in ages. It reveled in its depravity and had the ability to be both hilarious and disturbing at the same time. The Devil's Rejects is up the same alley. Not as much of a horror movie as its predecessor, The Devil's Rejects is more of an action-horror-road movie. It looks like a 30-year-old drive-in movie. If you didn't know any better, you could swear that it was filmed on a shoestring budget in the late '70s. It captures that feel extraordinarily well. The movie gets it down from the start and never strays from it, right down to the soundtrack. The first song that you hear in the movie is The Allman Brothers Band classic "Midnight Rider". The soundtrack also features Joe Walsh, Terry Reid, James Gang, Elvin Bishop, Otis Rush, etc. Not to mention a very memorable use of Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Free Bird".

If House of 1000 Corpses was Rob Zombie's homage to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Devil's Rejects seems almost like an homage to Tobe Hooper's 1986 sequel, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. The similarities are certainly there. William Forsythe's Sheriff Wydell is not far from Dennis Hopper's Lieutenant Lefty Enright, who maniacally pursues the family of killers to exact his revenge. The whole film reeks of Tobe Hooper worship (but not in a bad way).

The Tobe Hooper element is certainly there, but another director sprang to mind as I was watching the film. The Devil's Rejects is almost like the horror equivalent of Kill Bill, Quentin Tarantino's retro-martial arts-spaghetti western masterpiece. Upon seeing the film a second time, I was reminded of the work of yet another director: Sam Peckinpah. I don't know if Rob Zombie was directly influenced by Peckinpah (it's certainly likely), but all thoughout The Devil's Rejects I was reminded of films like The Wild Bunch, Straw Dogs and The Getaway. The first time I saw it, all I really thought of was Tobe Hooper, however I now see that The Devil's Rejects may be a bit of a Peckinpah homage as well. This certainly gives the film an element of style and class to contrast the otherwise trashy material.

Rob Zombie, just like Quentin Tarantino, is passionate about this genre of film and tries to make the ultimate drive-in homage. Just look at the roster of horror film veterans that Zombie assembled: Ken Foree, P.J. Soles, Mary Waronov, Michael Berryman, and Steve Railsback. If you know who any of these people are, then you are definitely part of the target audience for this film. Not to mention Sid Haig and Bill Moseley returning from House of 1000 Corpses.

Ahh, yes... Sid Haig and Bill Moseley. This movie absolutely belongs to them!! Haig and Moseley own the screen! These two actors alone make the film a must-see. They are awesome! If you liked Sid Haig's Captain Spaulding character from the first film, you will be delighted to know that he plays a much bigger part in this one. Sid Haig is a devilish delight as the mad clown, Captain Spaulding. Bill Moseley simply rules as Otis! He is a bad M.F. These two awesome performances carry the movie. Also worth mentioning is William Forsythe who is excellent as Sheriff Wydell, the obsessed lawman who is trying to track down Captain Spaulding and his cohorts. Next to Sid Haig and Bill Moseley, Forsythe gives one of the best performances in the movie. However, I really miss Karen Black as Mother Firefly. Not to say that Leslie Easterbrook isn't good in the role, but I think she goes a bit over the top. Karen Black would have brought a graceful sensuality to the character, and probably a bit of restraint.

So, is The Devil's Rejects a good movie? Well, that's not an easy question. The short answer is probably "no, it's not". By the conventional definition, it would probably not be labeled a cinematic triumph. However, Rob Zombie does a fine job directing and his dialog is deliciously profane. For those who like this sort of thing, the movie is a blast. Finally, allow me to state a blunt warning: If you are looking for a good, scary horror movie, The Devil's Rejects is probably not what you're looking for. If you like horror movies like The Ring and The Grudge, The Devil's Rejects is DEFINITELY not what you're looking for. Simply put, if you like modern horror movies a lot, you will probably not like The Devil's Rejects. On the other hand if you recognize Ken Foree from his roles in George Romero's Dawn of the Dead and Stuart Gordon's From Beyond, and you know Michael Berryman as the "freaky-looking guy" from The Hills Have Eyes, then yes, The Devil's Rejects is certainly for you. If you treasure your copy of VideoHound's "Cult Flicks and Trash Pics", then yes, this is for you. If you're not too squeamish, you'll probably have a bloody good time.
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57 of 73 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Devil's Rejects on Blu-Ray? Seems standard to me, January 11, 2007
This review is from: The Devil's Rejects (Unrated) [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Devil's Rejects is amongst my favorite films, for it's great mix of humor, action/violence/gore, and character development. Most people looking at this review already know all about this movie.

The Picture on this movie doesn't seem to be all that much of an improvement. I've seen VAST differences on Blu-Rays vs DVD (Unforgiven especially!!!), and this movie just doesn't seem to have all that much extra when watching it in Hi-Def.

There are no new special features in this release, so if you already own this title on DVD, I would advise against upgrading like I did.
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23 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rob Zombie gives the devil his due, July 24, 2005
The Devil's Rejects, Rob Zombie's follow up to his surprise hit House of 1000 Corpses, is one of the few horror sequels that manages to not only live up to the original, but it also manages to surpass it. Influenced by the classic exploitation/horror films of years past (Last House on the Left, the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre), Zombie has given the Devil's Rejects a much grittier look than his last film, as the story picks up with the homicidal Firefly family on the run from the law. Captain Spaulding (Sid Haig), Otis (Bill Moseley), and Baby (Sheri Moon Zombie) are on the lam from a revenge driven and slightly deranged sheriff (William Forsythe) who plans to give the killers a taste of their own medicine. Along the way, the trio adds more to the body count, resulting in a climactic bloody showdown that is surprisingly well weaved. While it doesn't necessarily offer anything new to the horror genre, it doesn't try to, and the cast that Rob Zombie has assembled here does great work. Haig walks the line between frightening and hilarious as the clown faced Captain Spaulding, while Moseley is less over the top this time around as Otis, but he is all the more subdued and terrifying. Leslie Easterbrook (replacing Karen Black) as Mama Firefly is a bit overacted, while Moon is once again seductively scary as Baby, while Forsythe almost steals the entire movie. Zombie has again assembled a supporting cast of older horror film and cult favorites, including the original Dawn of the Dead's Ken Foree, Hills Have Eyes icon Michael Berryman, Danny Trejo, PJ Soles, Priscilla Barnes, Steve Railsback, and former pro wrestler Diamond Dallas Paige; most of which are pretty memorable. Pushing the limits of it's R rating, the Devil's Rejects is not for the faint hearted, and while it may drag a bit towards the end (you are guaranteed to never listen to "Freebird" the same way again), this is a real treat for older horror fans looking for a film that recaptures the unpredictability and tension of the genre.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'D LIKE TO WELCOME SOME VERY OLD FRIENDS OF MINE!, April 16, 2014
Rob Zombie's love for horror movies really showed in his directorial debut House of 1,000 Corpses. The sequel The Devils Rejects is a completely different animal. This is more a homage to 70's grind house exploitation flick. It's not a bad thing an I have to give him credit for not making the same movie he did the first time.

The Devil's Rejects is different in tone, pacing and atmosphere. Once again Zombie enlists the talents of familiar character actors old and new. This time we get William Forsythe as a main character and Gregory Lewis, Pricilla Barnes, P.J. Soles, Danny Trejo and Brian Posehn in small roles.

I like the use of familiar faces in roles of victims as it allows us to care a little if they die without having to get to know them in this film. There is also lots of disturbing imagery in this film so it's not for the faint of heart. I only wish that Zombie would have used the entire Free Bird song for the finale, I mean it's a cool idea to use it the way he did so why not go for the gold and give everyone a eleven minute blood bath.

The 2 disc unrated edition DVD is the only way to go as the Blu Ray is hardly an upgrade in picture and you lose almost all the bonus material from the DVD including a 145 minute documentary.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Devil's Rejects, October 4, 2010
Coming off of the insane visual experience that was HOUSE OF 1,000 CORPSES, Rob Zombie performs a complete reversal in style and tone with his companion piece, THE DEVIL'S REJECTS. Picking up shortly after the events of the previous film, THE DEVIL'S REJECTS finds the Firefly family on the run from the law, and leaving a trail of bodies in the wake of their escape.

Here, Zombie is able to take a group of truly despicable monsters and somehow bring out their humanity in a way that makes them accessible and likable despite their horrifying acts. Many critics have argued that Zombie has unfairly forced the audience to align themselves with the killers through his kind portrayals of the characters, but he would be unable to do so without getting beneath their trashy exteriors and drawing out their twisted sense of family and friendship. Likewise, Rob demonizes the character of Sheriff Wydell, and transforms him from the altruistic "Hand of God" into the same breed of ruthless killer which he despises. It is only natural that the audience grows to hate him in the process. While each of the performances are provocative in their own right, it is Bill Moseley's depiction of the foul-mouthed Otis that stands out above all others. He commands the screen with a terrifying display of power and unmatched evil. Only William Forsythe stands to top him as the bulldog Sheriff that decides to take the law into his own hands.

THE DEVIL'S REJECTS removes the safety of the extravagant coloring and comic book characters from HOUSE in place of a washed-out color palette and gritty realism that is reminiscent of the original TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE. The film does maintain the humor from before, but it does so in a darker and more unsettling way. Otis, Baby, and Cutter make sharp but crude remarks that momentarily cut the tension during the disgusting torture scenes. They force guilty laughs out of audiences, who are then left feeling as sick and depraved as the villains as a result. Rob Zombie has not only dramatically improved his writing skills, but his directing and editing as well. The film's closing scene best epitomizes these changes, as the Reject's last standoff offers the same devastating impact as the climax of Ridley Scott's THELMA AND LOUISE. Yes, THE DEVIL'S REJECTS has just been compared to THELMA AND LOUISE.

THE DEVIL'S REJECTS is truly Exploitation at its very best. It is dirty, filthy smut, in all the right ways. No audience member can walk away unscathed from its horrifying depictions of blood and violence. Rob Zombie has created one of the defining films of the 2000's, and one that he may never be able to top.

-Carl Manes
I Like Horror Movies
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This crew makes Rob Zombie look normal, October 2, 2009
By 
Over the years Sid has heard a lot about Rob Zombie's The Devil's Rejects and decided to finally check it out. Watching leads you to one motley crew of freaks with Captain Spaulding being the most offensive and vile, if we had to pick one. He's played by Sid Haig, not of elf descent, who is one of the strangest looking human walking the earth. This guy would be just as creepy cashing a check at the bank as he would dressed up as his murderous clown character. Now we're full aware that this was the sequel to House of 1000 Corpses, but decided to watch this one first anyway since it appeared to be the better flick.

The film takes place in Ruggsville Texas as Sheriff John Wydell (William Forsythe) and a crew of police show up at the serial killing Reject's house. Opening fire they manage to catch mother Firefly as the rest of the crew gets away. Now on the lamb Otis and his sister Baby (played by Rob Zombie's wife who just happens to be really hot) meet up with daddy Captain Spaulding and keep reeking havoc on some innocent folks at a run down motel. However Sheriff John Wydell is bent on revenge for his brother's death and catched up to the Rejects for quite a great scene.

Surprisingly The Devils Rejects was a really good horror flick. Yes it was very gory, which we never look for, but it fit the film since these were very deranged people. As far as the reviews go it's either people love it or hate it. If you hate it then you probably went in expecting too much, which is never a good idea for a horror film. Usually if you don't set the bar too high you'll have yourself a fun watch. So to sum it up yes Sid enjoyed this and would have years ago especially for Sheri Moon Zombie, who Sid wouldn't mind chasing around the room with a pink turkey baster.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Meets Death Wish, May 7, 2007
By 
Stephen B. O'Blenis (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
Living up to the savage high mark set by "The House Of 1,000 Corpses", "The Devil's Rejects" is like "Death Wish" meets "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre". It's relentless vigilante-style justice vs. merciless insane horror, set against a backdrop of searing-hot deserts, barren roads and isolated motels and dwellings. It starts shortly after "House Of 1,000 Corpses" ended, picking up most but not all of the plot threads, but turning in a quite different, though no less intense, movie. The Firefly family's farmhouse is raided by a heavy contingent of the local law enforcement, starting the movie off with a massive firefight like something out of a western's climax, but put through a blast furnace and emerging darker, meaner and more vicious. With the Fireflies on the run - dubbed the Devil's Rejects by the media after people see what's inside that house - Sheriff Wydell (the brother of one of the Rejects's victims from the first movie) leads the forces of cops and bounty hunters on the Rejects's trail. The Rejects, meanwhile, both the hunted and the hunters, burn a swath of horror through the southwestern U.S.

It's extreme, disturbing, believable, and oddly cathartic in places. The Firefly family contains some of the most sadistic and violent villains in horror movie history, and it's odd to see the 'other side' - Wydell and company - on the offensive much of the time, bringing in a different kind of savagery to the show. The acting is brilliant, the direction excellent, and the use of music almost unprecedented: the way songs from the 70s (the era the movie takes place in) aren't just playing on a stereo but are worked into the score in perfect synchronicity with the onscreen flow (at times taking place in slow-motion that speeds up to normal as the song's tempo increases; incidentally this is one of the only movies I've ever seen that made me conciously think of what a great job the film editor did) enhances the movie to tremendous effect.

A masterpiece of extreme horror; few movies this ferocious and deranged have ever been put together so perfectly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More Violence and Torture Than "1000 Corpses": Rob Zombie Film in 70s Style and Not Bad at That, March 3, 2007
By 
Tsuyoshi (Kyoto, Japan) - See all my reviews
Though main characters from "House of 1000 Corpses" re-appear, it may not be exactly right to call "The Devil's Rejects' a sequel. True, "The Devil's Rejects" is extremely gory and violent, but the film's entire tone gets less jokey and more nihilistic, closer to that of new American films made in late 60s and early 70s before such as "Bonnie and Clyde" and "Straw Dogs."

Am I taking the film too seriously? Maybe or maybe not. Whatever the truths may be, it is true that writer / director Rob Zombie improved his skills. Beware, however, that his improved skills include several torture scenes and killings that will be disgusting to some. Body counts rise steadily up until its ending and so is the cruelty of the characters.

The story has not much to tell. Even fans of the film would admit that it is predictable and formulaic. The house of Captain Spaulding and his family is raided by policemen led by Sheriff John Quincy Wydell (William Forsythe). Two escape, but one is captured. The escapees start another killing spree before the final confrontation with the sheriff who prefers to exact vigilante type 'justice' by outdoing what the family had been doing.

The acting of the killing family is all in all good - good, I mean, in playing the nastiest and most sadistic characters in a frightening way - but it must be admitted that they are all outshined by underrated William Forsythe doing over-the-top acting which is fun to see. Fun is, I must add, of unique kind.

Viewers would find the film too bloody and sick, but some of them would love it for that reason. I was fascinated with Rob Zombie's skills to make relentlessly violent scenes about the relentlessly depraved people, and his homage to the 70s films, using the minimum-scale sets, road movie formula, hand-held camera, soundtrack music and so on. Lots of cameos include Michael Berryman. What else do you expect?

If you ask me whether I would see "The Devil Rejects" again or recommend to others, my answer would be probably No. But the watch was fascinating, and I couldn't stop watching it. But I am not sure you will find it the same way.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but not great., December 20, 2007
The Devil's Reject's is a pretty decent horror flick compared to the crap that Hollywood is pumping out nowaday's, but that's not saying much. It seems to me like this is more of a disturbing thriller than an actual horror film, there is not really any on-screen gore or special effect's, just offensive dioluge and bad CGI. Overall it just seemed like it could almost be considered a remake of Texas Chainsaw Massacre, so loses point's for originality in my book. I respect Rob Zombie's effort's in pushing the envelope and he's got talent, but just it felt like he was trying to hard in all the wrong way's. The overuse of swear's for instance was ridiculous, I think there were over 100 F-bomb's in the first five minute's, which does'nt offend me but it was just way overdone, and that mean's a lot coming from me......I f****ng swear constantly. I like the fact that he made the movie using film rather than going digital but the shaky hand held camera, and fast editing got annoying real fast. It was cool in the first scene, but after ten minute's I was begging for it to stop. The movie star's off strong, but slowly loses momentum all the way up to the slow-motion end sequence. I liked the camoes from Sid Haig (the best character in the movie) and Ken Foree though, it just seem's like Hollywood's version of exploitation to me. Good for a rental. 3.5 Star's.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A twisted horror masterpiece!, November 1, 2009
If you are offended by the F-Bomb, disgusted by dead animals and unfathomable filth, frightened by the thoughts of a serial killer dressed as a clown ala John Wayne Gacy, or appalled at onscreen murder and torture, then this is not the movie for you.

A psychotic family on a secluded ranch are awaken one morning by a police raid led by acerbic small town Sheriff Rydell (Williams Forsythe). What the law will soon find is not only the tens of missing people, but also the results of the most heinous mass murdering spree in U.S. history. When Rydell only manages to capture the family matriarch - Mother Firefly (Leslie Easterbrook) - his personal vendetta, which has a taken on Captain Ahab proportions, burns his desire for justice asunder.

The remaining family members are perhaps the most disturbed group of sociopathic killers ever. Led by foul mouthed father Captain Spaulding (Sid Haig), a quick-witted pervert who paints his face like a clown; the other two are brother Otis (Bill Moseley), a wraith-like psychopath with grungy hair (he looks like a Rob Zombie album cover); and sister Baby (Sheri Moon Zombie), a blonde bombshell who disarms with her beauty and surprises with her sadism. The trio wreaks havoc upon all they encounter, and abuse the world about them without remorse or hesitation. When Sheriff Rydell enlists the help of criminal mercenaries - played brilliantly by the duo of Danny Trejo and Diamond Dallas Page - the explosive situation runs its course in a heart-stopping finale.

Everything is near perfection, and Devil's Rejects has the feel of an older horror movie. With one Texas Chainsaw Massacre homage after another, there is definite respect paid to 70s and 80s horror (i.e. several unnecessary T&A shots, stupid people die, over-the-top sadism). Even Michael Berryman, original creepy bald guy from The Hills Have Eyes, makes an appearance as a pimp's right-hand man. The pacing of the movie falls right in line with theme, even providing a few freeze-frames mixed in so viewers can absorb the carnage. The blood and gore are all present, and just enough to satisfy the gorehound. The acting is top notch, believable, and downright scary. The lengths to which Haig, Moseley, and Zombie go to make everyone loathe them is outstanding; in their attempts at evil and wickedness, they are admirable.

Credit goes to Rob Zombie for making a captivating tale of evil, and for a creation that not only resembles the work of Tarantino, but rivals it as well. Highly recommended for the demented - one of the best horror movies of the past several years.
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The Devil's Rejects (Unrated) [Blu-ray]
The Devil's Rejects (Unrated) [Blu-ray] by Rob Zombie (Blu-ray - 2006)
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