REf Dictionaries Atlas Language Guides Writing Guides Learn more
Dictionary of the Future and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.99
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Dictionary of the Future: The Words, Terms and Trends That Define the Way We'll Live, Work and Talk Hardcover – December 12, 2001


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.59 $0.01
Unbound, Import
"Please retry"

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; 1 edition (December 12, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786866578
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786866571
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,558,601 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this clever but gimmicky attempt at lexical clairvoyance, trend-spotter Popcorn (The Popcorn Report) and advertising sage Hanft offer their best guesses as to the phrases and concepts that will emerge in the coming years. It is a "fictionary" rather than a dictionary, however, since it largely comprises terms not in active use. And yet they have a certain familiarity like "disability chic" (describing fashionable hearing aids and canes) or "relationshopping" (a step beyond "relationsurfing," it signals a desire to settle down). Entries are divided into subject categories rather than listed alphabetically to showcase future trends in areas where the current state of the language is insufficient (e.g., Aging, Biology and Biotechnology, New Jobs, and the intriguing section for Fear, Frustration and Desire). Each section concludes with "Dictionary of the Future Predicts," a listing of newly concocted terms, courtesy of the authors, for ideas yet to come. "Bankaurants," for example, will be chic restaurants that inhabit bank lobbies in the evening hours, while "Inkists" will signify those who continue to insist on signing documents with pens when an e-signature would suffice. This is an amusing book for those with a high tolerance for, or appreciation of, chatter about trendiness, but it will quickly date itself as the authors are proven right or wrong. (Dec. 12)Forecast: Popcorn's notoriety and her nod toward defining an uncertain future via verbal prescience will attract an early audience, but the novelty will wear off as quickly as it did for Rich Hall's Sniglets if not faster. After all, Hall's goal was entertainment; Popcorn's is utility.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Popcorn (EVEolution) is a prognosticator and marketing analyst whose Manhattan consulting firm, BrainReserve, advises companies like Campbell Soup and Eastman Kodak on trends in consumer interest. Among her claims to fame were predicting the failure of New Coke and naming the late-Eighties trend of staying at home "cocooning." Here, Popcorn and Hanft, who works in marketing and advertising and has contributed to Worth and Civilization magazines, gather about 1500 words and phrases that describe late-breaking phenomena and trendy concepts. The words and phrases are either gleaned from the press, TV, business, science, technology, and academia or fall under the heading "Dictionary of the Future Predicts," created by the authors to articulate realities not yet expressed in the language. Organized into 35 topical chapters such as "Computers," "Health & Medicine," "New Behaviors," and "Technology" are such future terms as "adulescent," which refers to the trend of baby boomer adults acting more like children; "ego surfing," looking yourself up on the Internet; and "food macho," meaning eating food others find objectionable. The topical organization, the book's disappointing name index, and the quirky, often manufactured entries diminish the usefulness of this book. While it may be entertaining reading, it is not a necessary purchase. Paul D'Alessandro, Portland P.L., ME
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
What a fascinating and original book.
gwengunderson
I cannnot recommend this book highly enough -- I can't think of anyone who wouldn't find rich value and stimulating thought here.
robert baldwin
It is a fictional dictionary of trendy words and expressions most likely to become common terminology in the future.
Sandra D. Peters

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Worldreels on January 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I suspect some of these reviewers gave themselves five stars for finishing the book. I don't know how one reviews this collection of terms. All I can say is here is a mixed bag of terms, half of which should never have survived the cut. Way too many are already in current usage, (e.g., lucid dreaming, mother-of-all, rage, brownfields), way too many will never become generally used because they are nearly unpronounceable (e.g., participlaytion, bacterroria), others add nothing to existing terminology (e.g., boatominiums or floatominiums for house boats; relationshopping for relation shopping or relationship shopping--Is one very long word better than two short ones?) and there are far too many compounds, words strung together arbitrarily (e.g., socially irresponsible investing, self unfulfilling prophecies, driving Miss Daisy syndrome). Are they patronizing the reader?
I would like to have seen the [...] sites included in the index--there were at least fifty of them relied on and cited. In fact, if the truth were known, the internet was the principal source of half of the thousand terms listed. I would have liked to see the list cut in half, using only the most interesting terms (actual new terms, not those just abbreviated or strung together). Also the authors organized the words into 35 idiosyncratic chapters (e.g., Figures of Speech; Fear, Frustration & Desire; New Behaviors). I would have liked to see half that number of Chapters (e.g., ego surfing was placed in New Behaviors instead of in Internet or Computers. Three sections: Computers, Internet and Technology might have been combined into one).
As to the sections that tried to predict which new terms might catch on--really only a useless guessing game. These sections added very little to the book (e.g.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "davidnoyola" on December 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The Dictionary of the Future is an exciting, quick read, filled with witty comentary and winning insight that I think taps into the zeitgeist of the culture. Don't think that this is your average, Webster-type dictionary -- it's really more about coming to terms with, and giving terms to the trends and the movements that will change the complexion of society. The Dictionary of the Future forecasts what culture will be like, and what it has already become; take the chapter on Terrorism, which has already become more than prescient. Opening the book is opening the door to the culture of next 50 years: Highly researched and smartly written, this is the book that your children will pick up down the road and wonder how we knew it back in 2001.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By robert baldwin on January 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Did Faith Popcorn have a brain transplant? Her earlier books were frothy and insubstantial, lacking substance and simply restating the obvious with a superficial twist. So when I received the Dictionary of the Future as a Christmas gift, I groaned. But what a surprise when I began to leaf through it. Page after page of insight, fascinating peeks into the future, and intellectual fun. I cannnot recommend this book highly enough -- I can't think of anyone who wouldn't find rich value and stimulating thought here. I don't know who this new co-writer is, but she should stick with him in the "future."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sandra D. Peters on January 3, 2002
Format: Hardcover
So you thought your teenager's lingo was difficult to understand? Wait until you get your hands on this book and the language of the future will knock your socks off! Faith Popcorn is one of the most terrific writers of our time. In my business management classes, I have referred to comments in her famous "Popcorn Report" many times. This book is off the beaten path but thoroughly enjoyable. It is a fictional dictionary of trendy words and expressions most likely to become common terminology in the future. How about going "realtionship shopping"? That signals a desire to settle down. Many are doing that now only without the catchy phrase attached. As for "bankaurants", they will be trendy restaurants by day, bank lobbies by night. As long as there is money in your account, I guess you can be assured of paying for the meal!
I thoroughly enjoyed this book from start to finish. As for me, it appears this baby boomer is still locked in a time warp and will forever be on the "inklist", those who still prefer to sign their signature with pen in hand as opposed to an "e-signature." Whatever happened to the pen and quill? The author leaves us with the feeling if we do not read the book, we will one day find ourselves trying to carrying on a stimulating conversation with a new-age generation and not having the foggiest idea of what they are saying to us. It rather reminds you of communication with your teenaged son or daughter - I am still trying to adjust to "awesome," "cool-man" and "hangin' loose"!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 2, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Having been enlightened by Faith Popcorn's past books, I immediately was attracted to a book called Dictionary of the Future. What could possibly be in it?
What I found was a pleasant surprise. Ms. Popcorn and Mr. Hanft (and their talented colleagues) have provided a valuable "speak preview" of existing concepts that seem to be catching on, new learning that is developing in scientific and technical fields, demographic imperatives (aging Baby Boomers and the spoiling of vast numbers of only children), and potential issues that could well emerge from existing trends. While no one would argue that all of these words, concepts, terms, and phrases will become mainstream, this book gives you a way to understand them long before they earn their way into a standard dictionary. Having seen how helpful this dictionary was to me, I hope that the authors will revise and update it from time to time, as occurs with more traditional, backwards-looking dictionaries.
The topics quickly expand into pages of specific listings. Here are some of the major topics: aging; art; biology and biotechnology; children and families; computers; corporate America; crime and terrorism; demographics; education; environment; fashions and style; fear and frustration; new figures of speech; food; government and politics; health and medicine; Internet; marketing and consumer experiences; new behaviors; new jobs; personal finance; religion; technology; and telecommunications. The authors encourage you to read the book from front to back (which I did), but also indicate that you can skip around. I think more people will enjoy the latter. Some of these topics just won't be as interesting to you as others are.
About 20 percent of the listings were things I knew about already.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.