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The Dictionary of Made-Up Languages: From Elvish to Klingon, The Anwa, Reella, Ealray, Yeht (Real) Origins of Invented Lexicons

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 860-1400402078
ISBN-10: 1440528179
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen D. Rogers has taught students in middle school, high school, and college, and thus has an intimate familiarity with made-up languages. He is the editor of My First Year in the Classroom: 50 Stories That Celebrate the Good, the Bad, and the Most Unforgettable Moments. He lives and writes in Buzzards Bay, MA.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Adams Media (November 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440528179
  • ASIN: B008SLRY66
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,757,649 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stephen D. Rogers is the author of SHOT TO DEATH, THREE-MINUTE MYSTERIES, and more than 900 shorter pieces. His website, www.StephenDRogers.com, includes a list of new and upcoming titles as well as other timely information.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First of all, while the idea of a true dictionary of constructed languages, where one could compare what word is used, for example, for "house" across various conlangs, would be a fascinating idea, despite the title, this is not a dictionary at all. I suppose one could call it an encyclopedia, although that too would be misleading. Basically, it's a paragraph or two about each of dozens of "made-up languages", where "made-up language" may be a "serious" artificial language like Esperanto, a "fun" one like Klingon, or just a fictional language like Anglic mentioned in passing in fiction and which lack grammars or vocabularies.

It seems odd that the author wastes so much time on the last category when there are so many fully developed artificial languages he neglects. For example, the author and linguistics professor M.A.R. Barker published a complete grammar and dictionary of his Tsolyani language for his well known Empire of the Petal Throne role-playing game, and yet this doesn't get so much as a mention. Ditto for Novial, an attempt at a "serious" artificial language by the well known linguist Otto Jespersen. Obviously no reference work can be complete, but again, it is odd that things like this are omitted while languages that are little more than names get a mention.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book provides little more than a glimpse at all the linguistic creations mentioned. But that is precisely what the title tells us is intended. So I rank it as excellent.

I almost gave it but four stars, however, since it did not delve deeply into lexicon issues of interest to me. But that would be unfair I decided.

It remains the most exhaustive set of examples of various invented languages in print.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A very clear and concise overview of several constructed languages across the fields of literature, theater, and even video games (though somehow Hymmnos was missing, which is a shame since it's also a legitimate conlang). It also has some tips on making your own language, though it might conflict with the detailed work of Mark Rosenfelder. Still, a must-read for the casual conlanger.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is basically just a catalog of the different 'made up languages". It does not give you complete alphabets or instructions on how to speak the languages,. It is basically a list and that's it.
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By Andrew on August 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Great book. While it doesn't delve too much into each individual language, but it does cover large amount of languages, and gives good information on each.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Did you ever wonder what Esperanto is and how it came about ? Have you always wanted to speak Klingon (often spoken in Star Trek episodes and movies) ? Do you want to learn more about the languages of the Middle Earth (spoken by Elves, Hobbits, and others in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit" and "Lord of the Rings" trilogy) ? This beautifully bound and printed cornucopia of little known languages makes for spellbinding and informative reading. As Spock would say, "Fascinating !" Enrich your linguistic and cultural knowledge with this delightful book.
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Format: Hardcover
Hakei kilo varitha?
Kilo til omei tubelasha
Opeifu nuish pereifi dhaku loiri?
Di pelushipo luhausha
Teleshanu kioka, voshara,
Dhaku borifa?
Ilu kilo til
Shai miara
Opeifu dho peranishaolu fenaiga
Boshu welu dauna mafu depa
Teshomu mafu pereisha?
Dho pereishumenu niapa
Piulauitiou
Boshu shai shiba opeifu diviula,
Til koiano befenetiu
Mafu shai shualira opeifu kureitha.
Dhaku zhau
liufima opeifu viula dhaku muana
Kilo oi pelufu
Ona nishoka kodi peliuto
Ona nishoka kodi guvato
Ona nishoka kodi daifiko
Veletu boshisha dhaku ishu boshu.
Shai kanifopa opeifu tubelasha
Kilo oi peshipu
Shai kiaupa opeifu zhiaga
Ilu shai nurina opeifu ferilopa
Til kilo varitha
Dhaku shai feruifa til lolifo.

What is language?
Is it an expression
Of our hopes and desires
To receive reward
Through work, love,
And strength?
Or is it
The ocean
Of a rambling brain
With more time for thought
Than for rest?
A restless mind
Unsatisfied
With the meal of today,
It yearns instead
For the soul of tomorrow.
And so
The convention of day and night
Is not enough
One must create
One must invent
One must challenge
From within and in with.
The journey of expresson
Is not just
The howl of pain
Or the grin of pleasure
It is language
And the play it endears.

Best Regards,
K Gerard Martin
Kenosha, Wisconsin
July 26, 2012
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