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The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made [Kindle Edition]

Greg Sestero , Tom Bissell
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (362 customer reviews)

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Kindle Price: $11.99
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Book Description

From the actor who somehow lived through it all, a “sharply detailed…funny book about a cinematic comedy of errors” (The New York Times): the making of the cult film phenomenon The Room.

In 2003, an independent film called The Room—starring and written, produced, and directed by a mysteriously wealthy social misfit named Tommy Wiseau—made its disastrous debut in Los Angeles. Described by one reviewer as “like getting stabbed in the head,” the $6 million film earned a grand total of $1,800 at the box office and closed after two weeks. Ten years later, it’s an international cult phenomenon, whose legions of fans attend screenings featuring costumes, audience rituals, merchandising, and thousands of plastic spoons.

Hailed by The Huffington Post as “possibly the most important piece of literature ever printed,” The Disaster Artist is the hilarious, behind-the-scenes story of a deliciously awful cinematic phenomenon as well as the story of an odd and inspiring Hollywood friendship. Greg Sestero, Tommy’s costar, recounts the film’s bizarre journey to infamy, explaining how the movie’s many nonsensical scenes and bits of dialogue came to be and unraveling the mystery of Tommy Wiseau himself. But more than just a riotously funny story about cinematic hubris, “The Disaster Artist is one of the most honest books about friendship I’ve read in years” (Los Angeles Times).


Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Reading this downright thrilling book is a lot like watching Tim Burton’s Ed Wood: it’s sometimes infuriating, often excruciating, usually very funny, and occasionally horribly uncomfortable, but it’s also impossible to look away from. The Room, a 2003 film written, directed, and starring the inscrutable Tommy Wiseau, was massively and enthusiastically lambasted by critics, proclaimed by some as the worst movie ever made (an insult, some movie fans might say, to Ed Wood’s Plan 9 from Outer Space). Sestero, who starred in The Room, teams up with magazine journalist Bissell (who previously wrote about the movie in Harper’s) to walk us through the unpredictable, confusing, and—it must be admitted—wildly incompetent production of Wiseau’s vanity project. This is a making-of book like no other, the day-to-day story about the filming of a movie that everyone involved with it, except its creator, knew was awful. But it’s also the story of a very interesting friendship between Sestero and Wiseau (who knew each other for several years before The Room), and the story of an enigmatic and incredibly self-absorbed man who, in making his film, seemed to be trying to exorcise a troubled past and build an entirely new version of himself. Wiseau, for all his eccentricities, comes off as a sympathetic fellow, someone we, like Sestero, can’t help rooting for. The Room has become a cult fave, and this book goes a long way toward explaining how and why. --David Pitt

From Bookforum

The Disaster Artist is co-written (or probably, judging by its wit and literacy, written) by journalist Tom Bissell, and with its allusions to Ripley and Sunset Boulevard, it understands the story it wants to tell. Tommy is a middle-aged man of some means and cloudy provenance, desperately lonely, waiting for the world to take notice. Greg is the beautiful young man who notices. —Louis Bayard

Product Details

  • File Size: 28404 KB
  • Print Length: 289 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1451661193
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (October 1, 2013)
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BSAZ6LE
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,732 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
(362)
4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
132 of 134 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
Greg Sestero has done something fantastic. He's managed to perfectly pinpoint all of Tommy Wiseau's eccentricities and show us exactly why we should care about him. Our dear Sestosterone is not only talented at growing beards and playing football, he's also a great and engaging writer. As a longtime fan of The Room, I really enjoyed the way Greg switched between talking about his early years with Tommy and the actual drama happening on the set of The Room. Each anecdote is better than the last.

I think as fans we sometimes forget that these characters we see onscreen (and yell insults to on countless midnight screenings) are portrayed by actual human beings, separate from their characters. I loved reading about how Juliette Daniels ended up playing Lisa and Dan Janjigian's preparation for the Oscar-worthy role of Chris-R. The Disaster Artist has brought an entirely new dimension to The Room. The book's biggest feat was helping the reader understand Tommy Wiseau, as much as anyone can understand Tommy Wiseau. Some of the details that Greg shares with us break my heart. I now view Tommy in the same way one would view a vampire puppy-- with an equal mixture of "aw" and "eek".

I can be sure that the next midnight screening I attend, I'll be giggling to myself over how long it took to shoot the famous, "I did naaht heet her" line. Or over the real reason why Peter was blinking so much. Or whether the enigmatic Chloe knows what obscenities audiences yell when they see her name appear onscreen. Without this book I would never have known that I've memorized The Room better than Tommy Wiseau. It was a fantastic read and I'm so excited to see what Greg Sestero does next!
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77 of 78 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful and Brutally Honest - Not What I Expected October 7, 2013
By Adara
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
As a huge fan of "The Room," I went into this book expecting to hear a first-hand account of the wackiness that must have occurred while filming and maybe a little inside info on Tommy Wiseau. I would have been perfectly happy if the book had been that simple, but it was that plus so much more. In a way, Greg Sestero has created the moving, raw, true-to-life biography that "The Room" was supposed to be. This isn't a funny book about a hilariously bad movie... It's a sad book about a deeply troubled man who was basically able to buy his way to fame. It's not a pretty picture that's painted here, but it's honest and like all things in life, there are shades of gray. Tommy is selfish, manipulative, and controlling, yet I can understand why Greg (or anyone really) would be drawn to him. Underneath it all he's still a little kid, and there's something refreshing about childlike idealism. Tommy really is the tragic figure he tried to portray in the character of Johnny, but not for the reasons he thinks. Also, the book is informative and interesting as it follows Greg through the excruciating process of trying to make it as an actor in LA. This book gave depth to "The Room" that I almost don't want it to have. It's harder to laugh knowing I'm laughing at a pathetic, pitiable human being who basically spent 6 million dollars to pretend he had friends. That's doesn't mean I won't laugh or I'll stop loving "The Room." I just didn't expect this book to have the depth that it does. Well done, Greg.
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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
You're probably interested in this book for the same reasons I was: You love/hate The Room, you want to read some funny behind-the-scenes stories about its making, and you're hoping to have some mysteries about the movie and its oddball director/writer/producer cleared up. Rest assured, you will get all that, and more, from reading this excellent book by Greg Sestero ("Mark"), and writer Tom Bissell. The Disaster Artist is part memoir of a struggling young actor, part "making of" of a cult classic, and part chronicle of the rise and fall of a bizarre friendship.

Fans of The Room tend to have a lot of questions. Why is the dialogue so odd? How old was Denny supposed to be? What happened to Peter? Who was Steven? Why the football? Why a rooftop? Why the pictures of spoons? What's with that flower shop scene? Who is Tommy Wiseau, really, and where did he get the money to film this thing?

Sestero does his best to answer these questions, though many things about Wiseau's past will probably forever remain a mystery. I don't wish to spoil the book for anyone, but I feel I must answer The Big Question in order to write a proper review and let the potential reader know what they are in for. Is Tommy Wiseau "in on the joke," so to speak? That is to say, is The Room intentionally funny?

The answer is no.

I've read a lot of funny books over the years, but I can't recall another that made me laugh out loud so often, or so hard, as The Disaster Artist. Sestero's insights into the making of "the Citizen Kane of bad movies" had me in childish fits of giggles, as did the glimpses into "Tommy's Planet." Wiseau, you see, always wanted a planet of his own.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
By Kristen
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I am a little bit obsessed with The Room. It's not a constant thing--I can go for months without watching it or talking about it or probably even thinking about it--but sooner or later, I find myself talking to a friend or acquaintance about my love of entertainingly bad movies, and I mention the The Room as being (in my opinion) the best bad movie ever made. Usually the person I'm speaking to will not have heard of The Room, or will have heard of it but not seen it, which immediately necessitates bringing up internet video footage and inevitably rekindles the obsession. Who is this Tommy Wiseau? Where did he get that crazy accent, how old is he, and how in the heck did he make enough money to pour six million dollars of his personal fortune into this movie, and what on earth was he trying to accomplish by doing so?

If you have seen The Room, you probably already realize that the man behind the movie is a person who doesn't see things the way the rest of us see them. We see poorly-built sets, ill-fitting and unflattering costumes, stilted dialogue riddled with non sequiturs, rampant continuity issues, bad green screen special effects, nonsensical plotlines, and most of all, Tommy himself, who is probably the worst actor you've ever seen unless you attend a lot of middle school theater productions...and maybe even then. But, as this book very eloquently explains, Tommy saw something else entirely.

If you are looking for pee-your-pants funny anecdotes about what it was like for Greg Sestero to be first Tommy's friend and then, eventually, his employee on the set of The Room, they're here. (He had to write down the code to his apartment's gate because he could never remember it--it was 1234!!
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read
Fascinating. So far. Tommy is so intriguing. He's kind of sad, kind of kooky, and seems nice. I'd have a cup of hot water with Tommy. Read more
Published 3 days ago by Little Lisa
5.0 out of 5 stars Audiobook is Superb!
Such a great story! You do not need to have seen the movie to really enjoy every sentence of this book.
Published 8 days ago by Jillian Morie
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Very interesting and kinda sad
Published 10 days ago by katy
5.0 out of 5 stars If you thought this movie was weird to *watch*...
I'm always a little nervous about opportunity books that are written "with" someone, but in this case, all the five-star reviews don't lie. Read more
Published 13 days ago by EJon
5.0 out of 5 stars must-read for any Room "fan"
Adds a level of nuance to the worst film ever that I could have never imagined possible.
Published 13 days ago by Scott Rank
5.0 out of 5 stars Greg Sestero obviously didn't actually WRITE this, but his memories...
This book has "the other actual writer did the actual writing" all over it. And that's not a put-down. You will not be able to put this book down. Read more
Published 15 days ago by CultFilmFreaksDotCom
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't be chicken...cheep cheep cheep. Read this book.
Oh hai, review readers! I just wanted pop by here and say if any of you are considering this book, I cannot recommend the audible version enough. Read more
Published 16 days ago by Wanderingalien
5.0 out of 5 stars Haiku Review
This movie is nuts
Tommy the Vampire King
A book for all fans
Published 16 days ago by Sam
5.0 out of 5 stars An important piece of literature
This book is life changing. If you're a fan of the movie The Room, you'll be enthralled by this. This book almost reads like a novel. Read more
Published 21 days ago by Viridiana Gaeta
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Fascinating story of a truly bizarre experience. Whether you've seen the movie or not, it makes a great read.
Published 22 days ago by pinmagic
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More About the Author

Greg Sestero is an actor, producer, and writer. He was born in Walnut Creek, California and raised between the San Francisco Bay Area and Europe. He is fluent in both French and English.

At the age of 17, Greg began his career in entertainment by modeling in Milan for such designers as Valentino and Armani. Upon returning to California, Greg went onto pursue acting and appeared in several films and television shows before co-starring in the international cult phenomenon The Room. Greg's many passions include film, sports, nutrition, animals, and traveling.

His memoir "The Disaster Artist" is being turned into a movie by James Franco, Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg.

www.thedisasterartistbook.com

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