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The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and Standardized Tests, the K-12 Education that Every Child Deserves Paperback – September 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0140296242 ISBN-10: 0140296247 Edition: Later Printing

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The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and Standardized Tests, the K-12 Education that Every Child Deserves + The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach + Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons in Theory and Practice
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Later Printing edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140296247
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140296242
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #229,466 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A must-read for every educator, parent or anyone who cares about our children's future. (Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence) -- The New York Times Book Review

About the Author

Howard Gardner is Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Harvard University; Adjunct Professor of Neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine; and Codirector of Harvard Project Zero.

More About the Author

Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Mark Valentine on October 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
Fortunately for readers (and anyone connected to education), Gardner has not been idle since he first published his benchmark book Frames of Mind. I sincerely appreciated reading how he has continued to develop his thinking in cognitive psychology and his suggestions for education need to be taken seriously as a blueprint for change. Along with Postman, Kohn, Ravitch, Darling-Hammond, Allen, and Perrone, Gardner takes the position that education relates cultural values as much as anything. Further, those values need to engage the student in sustained, meaningful encounters in science, art, and narrative that produce a vigorous, cognitive growth. His candid suggestions for educators to assimilate units on truth, beauty, and goodness suggest that Gardner is not only willing to make a radical suggestions for the advancement of learning among children (in the spirit of Dewey and Bruner), but also that the humanitarian interests in education are worth sustaining; that is, for Gardner, meaning needs to take ascendency in our instruction.
Gardner is a fantastic writer. He has a gift for explanation and explication; I recommend the book if only for the Appendix. He delineates between two world views in education and it is worth the price of the book itself.
Yes, his suggestions are radical and extreme, but being normal is only taking education down to a new nadir. I heartily endorse this book.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 12, 2005
Format: Paperback
In previous books, Professor Gardner has introduced us to important concepts like multiple intelligences (Frames of Mind) and how little university graduates can make practical application of anything they learn (The Unschooled Mind). In The Disciplined Mind, he takes those concepts and combines them to define a minimum educational standard: Introducing students to the thought processes of major disciplines to appreciate important issues from the perspective of multiple intelligences.

To exemplify the point, Professor Gardner develops examples of his concept involving Darwin's Finches (as a window on evolutionary thinking), one scene from The Marriage of Figaro by Mozart (as a window onto social commentary and music) and the Wannsee Conference in Nazi Germany (as a window onto the banal evil of the Holocaust). He sees the fundamental questions that education should address as following into the subjects of truth, beauty and goodness (or good versus evil) which these three examples epitomize.

Those sections were great fun, but the most valuable part of the book comes in chapter 10 where he addresses "Getting There". It's a marvelous description of how to create positive organizational change within education. Professor Gardner gets tough in pointing out that good leadership is essential. Otherwise, multidisciplinary means just messing around with whatever appeals to you . . . and not learning a darn thing of lasting importance.

I can relate to that point. One of my first college courses was intended to teach us the historical discipline by working with primary sources about the Entresol Club in France before the Revolution. But the case didn't really work for that purpose and the leadership was muddled.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By dr stock on June 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
Howard Gardner has remarkable insights about what schools should be doing. He discusses some things a rookie teacher such as myself has barely given thought to. I now have a better vision of what I should be doing as a teacher and how to manage the various agendas that are pushed on teachers from every direction. I give four, maybe five stars for Gardner's insights but because this was such a tedious read, cannot give the final product the same rating. Educators have much to gain by reading this book but will need patience if they hope to read it cover to cover.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Glacier Mom VINE VOICE on November 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
Well, it took some discipline on my part to finish it. Because I passionately agree with Gardner on the importance of going slow and deep, because throughout the book I felt I was listening to someone of congenial temperament (likely an abstract idealist), because I admire his triplet examples of the good, the true & the beautiful and his respect for mastery of the disciplines, I am flummoxed by my inability to spark to the book, which I found almost painfully circumspect. The language is of that heavy, deadly, academic variety, you know, as if he's trademarking concepts such as "pathways to understanding." Then there's the emphasis on "community", a ruined word for me thanks to my undergraduate years in the politically-correct late '80's and early '90's. Students, ideally, would give "performances of understanding" to the community. Kind of like writing a book review for the Amazon community? My approval score is pretty low, so maybe that's why I'm dragging my feet.

Recently, I attended a riveting seminar given by a Ph.D. in soil fertiity on the subject of "life force energy" and particularly emphasizing the work of Wilhelm Reich. The lecturer emphasized the rarity of functional thinking, the ability to see common functioning priciples in order to make connections in research; he talked about how the repression of emotions and impulses is a barrier to making contact with natural living systems; he contrasted this type of rich, syncretic thinking with the mechanistic or materialistic thinking one sees in the academy today. I tried to make a connection with Gardner's emphasis on depth. I wondered, as I often do, if Ken Wilber and Integral Philosophy folks could help here, but unfortunately they seem to have little use for children in their sexy Integral Universe.
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