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The Disinherited: Journal of a Palestinian Exile (Mr Modern Reader PB-248) 2nd Edition

4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0853452485
ISBN-10: 0853452482
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Product Details

  • Series: Mr Modern Reader PB-248
  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press; 2 edition (January 1, 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0853452482
  • ISBN-13: 978-0853452485
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,793,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Rafiq on July 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
The author writes his experience as a Palestinian refugee, gives the reader an idea of how Palestinians have been through numerous problems and crisis ever since their exodus from THEIR land in 1948 by the Zionists. He also gives a true picture of the Arab situation, how weak it is, and how Arabs even were against Palestinians themselves. The book is unique since the author combines some of his personal experience with stories, political history, and review. It's a must-read book, gives a clear picture to those who really want to know more about the issue in the Middle East.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Renato Friedmann on June 3, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Should be read by palestinians, israelis, jews and arabs - and, of course, by the general public. This book is a confused, but strangely enlightening, mix of history, politics and personal experiences of the author. It is a frank statement of the emotional and ethical dillemmas of a palestinian whose family was displaced by the 1948 war and who was brought up in Lebanon - stateless and discriminated against by his own arab "brothers". People talk too much about Saïd's "The Question of Palestine", but Türki's book is the real thing, whilst Saïd's book is polluted by his conspiracy theories of a "racial conflict created by the West against the Arabs". Read Türki, and do not waste your time on Saïd.
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By Alyssa A. Lappen VINE VOICE on December 20, 2007
Format: Unknown Binding
Anti-Zionists often falsely claim not to hate Jews, only Israelis and Zionists. This 1972 book puts the lie to that recently-adopted contention, however.

"[T]his is not an objective work," the author notes in his 8-page preface. Turki recognizes that innumerable historical works have presented "devastatingly convincing" accounts of the "Zionist/Israeli/Jewish (call it what you wish) claim" to Israel.

He suggests, his isn't "a vexatious issue, nor has it much to do with the conflict now raging between the Arabs and the Zionists."

Alas, Turki contradicts himself --- importantly demonstrating that before the massive October 1973 Arab attack on Israel (described in The Yom Kippur War: Epic Encounter That Transformed the Middle East), few Arabs distinguished Jewish people from Israelis or Zionists. In their lexicon, these were synonyms.

The category of historical accounts Turki so readily castigates as "devastatingly convincing" includes hundreds of scholarly, meticulously researched histories--like Uri Milstein's comprehensive 5-volume History of the War of Independence: Vol. 1: A Nation Girds for War, Vol. II, Vol. III, Vol. IV and
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ed Gehead on February 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
Just finished this 155-page journal (1972) by Fawaz Turki, a passionate, articulate, young Palestinian. It's a short biography describing his life following his family's flight to Lebanon from their home in Israel in 1947. After living a life of humiliation as a refugee his outlook dramatically changed when he became educated and politically active as Palestinian nationalism was emerging as a force in 1967. He credits Arafat with awakening the Palestinians to recognizing their independent nationhood and their right to establishing their homeland without relying on the Arabs. Having read several books on the history of Israel, I found no inaccuracies in the author's account of the abuses suffered by the Palestinians in Israel's drive to expand its lands at their expense. Throughout most of the journal the author comes across as destructively embittered, hating and abusing nearly every westerner he encounters. His hatred extends to the surrounding Arab leaders who talk of driving the Zionists into the sea but who in reality are concerned with their own limited land interests and not those of the Palestinians. His journal ends in 1971 and he brings us up to date on the Palestinians situation which has them defeated in a civil war in Jordan, living principally on Jordan's west bank, in a Gaza strip controlled by Israel but claimed by Egypt, and in refugee camps in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.

What I found extremely interesting is that at this point (1971), the author sets forth an analysis suggesting that the Palestinians have essentially two choices in establishing a homeland.
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