The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $3.50 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Inside pages and text free of notes or highlighting. Cover shows typical signs of light use. Red remainder mark along bottom outside pages. Eligible for FREE Super Saving and Prime shipping. Fulfilled by Amazon - Buy with confidence!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy, Revised and Expanded Paperback – October 12, 1986


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.99
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.50
$8.34 $1.16

Frequently Bought Together

The Doctor and the Soul: From Psychotherapy to Logotherapy, Revised and Expanded + The Will to Meaning: Foundations and Applications of Logotherapy (Meridian S) + Man's Search for Meaning
Price for all three: $29.67

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 318 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 3rd edition (October 12, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394743172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394743172
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 4.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,007 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"One of the outstanding contributions to psychological thought in the last fifty years."- Professor Carl Rogers

"The author attempts to subject the great phenomenon of life to a new evaluation... Well written backed by powerful personal conviction, it contains many valuable practical hints."- American Journal of Psychotherapy

"Perhaps the most significant thinking since Freud and Adler... Unconditional faith in an unconditional meaning is Dr. Frankl's message to the reader."- American Journal of Psychiatry

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation)

More About the Author

Viktor E. Frankl was professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Vienna Medical School until his death in 1997. He was the founder of what has come to be called the Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy (after Freud's psychoanalysis and Adler's individual psychology)--the school of logotherapy.

Born in 1905, Dr. Frankl received the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna. During World War II he spent three years at Auschwitz, Dachau and other concentration camps.

Dr. Frankl first published in 1924 in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis and has since published twenty-six books, which have been translated into nineteen languages, including Japanese and Chinese. He was a visiting professor at Harvard, Duquesne, and Southern Methodist Universities. Honorary Degrees have been conferred upon him by Loyola University in Chicago, Edgecliff College, Rockford College, and Mount Mary College, as well as by universities in Brazil and Venezuela. He was a guest lecturer at universities throughout the world and made fifty-one lecture tours throughout the United States alone. He was President of the Austrian Medical Society of Psychotherapy.


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
The concepts are as sharp as the 1st time I read his 1st book.
Oba
What we can begin to understand is the purpose and meaning of human life as unique to each person.
William
One scene from Frankl's autobiography, Man's Search for Meaning, encapsulates this thought well.
puritanfan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

192 of 198 people found the following review helpful By "groovylew" on May 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Frankl's logotherapy enables people to once again discover the quality of life. Frankl believes that the first two schools of Viennese psychotherapy (Freud and Adler), which he calls the depth psychology, must be complimented the logotherapy - the height psychology. His therapy explores man's future instead of his past. Summarizing the Freudian concept as the will to pleasure and the Adlerian concept as the will to power, Frankl points out that man's basic motivation in life is neither pleasure nor power. Each person lives to discover the meaning of life and thereby to fulfill it - the will to meaning. Life is too meaningful for man to comprehend: it is essentially incomprehensible because it lies on a higher realm than that of man's. During the World War 2, Frankl survived four concentration camps including Auschwitz. In the camps, most of the inmates despaired that if they did not survive the camp, there was no meaning in suffering. Frankl, on the other hand, believed that if there was no meaning in suffering, there was no point in surviving the camp. In other words, the meaning of life was either unconditional regardless of the situation one was facing, or it was none at all. In the camps, Frankl would console his inmates telling them, "Someone looks down on each of us in difficult hours ?a friend, a wife, somebody alive or dead ?and he would not expect us to disappoint him. He would hope to find us suffering proudly ?not miserably ?knowing how to die.? He would explain to them that it was not them asking the meaning of life. It was life asking them the meaning, and they had to answer to it. What Frankl witnessed in the camps contradicted Freud's theory that if people were left without food for few days, their wants would be reduced to the common desire for food.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
91 of 93 people found the following review helpful By puritanfan on May 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
Some of the most important principles in my life can be found in Dr. Viktor Frankl's The Doctor and the Soul. Without them, I along with my efforts to do good in the world would be lost in cynicism and depression. The book is an answer to Ecclesiastes' refrain, "Vanity of vanities, all is vanity." The book is an answer of hope.

I have pitied certain people to the point of questioning how they could endure life. I think of the boy whose alcoholic father had poured gasoline over him while he was sleeping. His face and over 90% of his body had been burned and melted. He no longer has ears, lips, or a nose. This nine year old boy has 50 or 60 more years to live among us.

In this depressing context, Dr. Frankl's mission in life was to help others realize meaning in their lives no matter their condition. The fundamental premise behind Frankl's life work is that "whoever has a reason for living endures almost any mode of life - Nietzche" (p.54). One scene from Frankl's autobiography, Man's Search for Meaning, encapsulates this thought well.

One night when his fellow prisoners of a concentration camp had received word that they would all be gassed the next day, the people looked to the Viennese psychiatrist for solace. He in turn was able to help each person discover personal reasons to endure which carried them through that dark night with hope and dignity. For example, Frankl helped one person overcome despair by reaffirming the man's fleeting hope that his suffering and death would somehow mean that his wife and family would be saved from such a fate. Instead of perceiving his situation as mere waste and tragedy, this man was enabled to convert his inescapable plight into a noble, heroic deed.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
140 of 153 people found the following review helpful By chosen@weblnk.net on April 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
Adler thought all human motivation was based on the will to power, manifesting itself in men's desires to get rich and to exercise dominion and women's desire to marry such men. Freud thought all human motivation was based on the will to sex, that is to say the will to procreate the manifestations of which we see in our sex obsessed society. Frankl shows that the misplacement of these desires in the center of human life causes all of the psychological turmoil under which our society suffers. He shows that by putting (dare I say) God, and the purpose for which He created each individual at the center of human existence (the will to meaning), love (misunderstood as the will to sex) and creativity (misunderstood as the will to power)are put into a proper perspective. Frankl's treatise makes the insights of Adler and Freud useful to the religious individual who consider either of these great psychologists secular humanist riff-raff. More over it renders the endless the tangled web weaved by psychoanalysis unnecessary as it shows how understanding oneself as a purposeful being one can alleviate all the binding ties of compulsion, addiction, and irrational fear. INCREDIBLE.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William on March 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most people only look into this book after they have read Man's search for meaning (also written by Victor Frankl). This is the manuscript of the book Victor Frankl had written before entering Auschwitz which he was forced to discard with. This is the reconstructed manuscript. It is a beautiful book but the translation is not nearly as fluent as Man's Search for Meaning and it can be difficult reading in parts. I have included my notes on this book below so that you can get a sense of this book. I loved it and I would highly recommend it, these are my notes from the book and most of it is verbatim:

Man's innate desire is to give as much value as possible to his life; to actualize as much meaning as possible. Therein he is faced with an interesting problem: what are the possibilities for giving life meaning; for realizing values? There are several answers. Men can give meaning to their lives by what I call creative values; by achieving tasks. But they can also give meaning to their lives by realizing experiential values, by experiencing goodness, the truth, beauty, or by knowing one single human being in all his uniqueness. And to experience one human being as unique is to love him.

But even a man who finds himself in the greatest of distress, in which neither activity nor creativity can bring values to life nor experience give meaning to it- even such a man can still give him life a meaning by the way he faces his fate; his distress. Even a man who finds himself in the greatest distress, in which neither activity nor experience give meaning to his life- even such a man can still give his life meaning by the manner in which he faces his fate. By taking his suffering upon himself in a dignified manner, he may yet realize values.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search