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Comment: Good copy with moderate cover and page wear from being handled and read. Accessories or dust jacket may be missing. Could be an ex-library copy that will have all the stickers and or marking of the library. Some textual or margin notes possible, and or contain highlighting.
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The Dog Who Wouldn't Be Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1280L (What's this?)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 211 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books (June 1, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553279289
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553279283
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,390 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Farely Mowat's best loved book tells the splendidly entertaining story of his boyhood on the Canadian prairies. Mutt's pedigree was uncertain, but his madness was indisputable. He climbed tress and ladders, rode passenger in an open car wearing goggles and displaying hunting skills that bordered on sheer genius. He was a marvelous dog, worthy of an unusual boy growing up a raw, untamed wilderness.

From the Inside Flap

Farely Mowat's best loved book tells the splendidly entertaining story of his boyhood on the Canadian prairies.  Mutt's pedigree was uncertain, but his madness was indisputable.  He climbed tress and ladders, rode passenger in an open car wearing goggles and displaying hunting skills that bordered on sheer genius.  He was a marvelous dog, worthy of an unusual boy growing up a raw, untamed wilderness.

Customer Reviews

This book had me laughing out loud time after time.
swinterhawk@getty.edu
Farley Mowat really knows how to tell a story and you'll come to wish Mutt had been your dog.
Diane Murray
I was first told about this book by my sister who had read it years ago and loved it.
Judy G. Werner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Catherine Hallberg on July 20, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a tale that couldn't happen today. Dogs don't have the lifestyle they did in the 1920's and 1930's in remote Canada, and sadly, boys don't either.
Mutt is a fascinating mutt with a mind of his own; halfway through the book I realised he must be part Siberian Husky with his deafness, his love of roaming and chasing and need to attend to his own desires.
Farley's mother demonstrated an act of faith- as well as the desire to save [money amount]- when she purchased Mutt as a puppy from a starving duck seller. Farley's dad wanted a hunting dog; Farley's mom didn't want to spend a lot of money on a dog during the Dust Bowl years, living in Saskatoon.
Dogs roamed free, boys roamed free. Boys weren't sent off to summer camp to keep busy- there was enough to do with their own imaginations, their friends and their animal companions. Attitudes towards cats were cavalier; some parts are very hard to read if you appreciate cats. Thankfully that attitude has changed over time.
The stories of the father's boating attempts are hilarious. I don't like boats, but am inspired to read "the boat that wouldn't float" by the same author. I live in the western US and have a vague understanding of how difficult it would be to navigate some of these rivers so I appreciated the delusional voyage of The Coot.
Farley paints his parents as people who had their own interests and needs, but also understood the needs of their son and his dog. They understood that living in a city wouldn't work for them, after several years living in the sparse western provinces. Farley's imagination was clearly nurtured and allowed him to become the prolific writer he became. Even the car (Eardlie, a Model A) has a character and idiosycrasies that add to the story.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By james k siegman on May 11, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this for the first time when I was in about 6th or 7th grade and loved it. It was my introduction to Farley Mowat and since then I have read many of his other works.
This book is one of the most entertaining books I have ever read. I loved it 30 years ago when I was a kid (maybe 11 or 12) and I enjoyed it again last year.
The story is about the life and times of Mutt, the dog that entered the Mowat family and grew up with Farley. Mutt is all dog and a little more. Frustrated with the local cat population and their dominance of the fencetop and rooftop world, he learns to walk fence tops. He develops hunting and retrieving techniques that are the talk of the country -- literally! Each chapter is a new story, a new adveneture into the life of Mutt.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is one of the funniest books that I have ever read. Mutt, the dog, comes to the family in a basket filled with ducks. The father in the story wants an expensive pure bred dog for hunting. However, mother circumvents this by plucking out the dog, paying one cent, and saving lots of money. There are plenty of misadventures in the story, from mutt retrieving a stuffed pheasent in the city (after father pointed his shotgun and said bang), to climbing a ladder into the eccentric womans house filled with 50 cats. There was the encounter with the skunk (in the basement of the house) and the time father accidentally used bluing to clean the dog. The part about the owls is funny and interesting as well. Needless to say, Mutt has many adventures, all of them hilarious I have read this book many times.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 10, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
i am reading this book with my dad and having a fun time.mutt,comes to this family for only a penny but brings a millon laughs.he did not think he was a dog so he did not ACT like a dog.when he didn't want to do something he pretented not to hear it.he would put on an expression that said,''i'm sorry,were you speaking to MOI? my two favorite parts are when the dad turns mutt blue and when the dad shot his gun and fell into the dich.you will have to read the book to find out the rest.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Frank H. Straus on October 20, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was astonished to find "The Dog Who Wouldn't Be" is apparently out of print in 2001. I easily found a copy in the Springfield, Illinois city library, but it ought to be buyable in the marketplace for those who want to have it and keep it.
Have you ever wondered what your grandfather was like when he was a boy? The "yarns" and stories in this book may give you some clues. Don't believe for one second that all the adventures related in this book are strictly true. Mowat is a great storyteller and he, like Mark Twain, took his memories and made from them something great and wonderful.
This book declares war on all of the cats of the world, as one of my fellow reviewers has correctly noted. Cat lovers beware! You won't like this book. For everyone else who wants an idealized window on the lives of boys growing up in the 1930s and 40s, take a look. The boys you see in this volume are not boys any more. They are grandfathers. They won't be around forever. If you want to know and love them better while they are still here, read this book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mother of 3 avid readers on November 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
My husband has been reading this book aloud to our three children, ages 12, 10 and 7. They howl with laughter when he reads it (a sound that is music to the ears) and demand more. The book provides an excellent opportunity to learn about and discuss different ways of life and different times.
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