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The Domain Game Hardcover – May 21, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 209 pages
  • Publisher: Xlibris (May 21, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1436332281
  • ISBN-13: 978-1436332286
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,225,790 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Kesmodel is an assistant news editor at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires in Chicago. David currently edits agriculture coverage and manages a team of five reporters. Previously, he covered beats such as aerospace, alcohol and tobacco as a WSJ staff reporter. In the mid-2000s, David covered technology for WSJ.com, where he came up with the idea of writing a book on the Internet domain-name market. He´s also written for newspapers such as Denver's Rocky Mountain News and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. He lives in Chicago with his wife and daughters.

Customer Reviews

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A well written book on domainers and their passion-Domaining.
Salman Habibullah
It's a fascinating history of the high stakes game of buying and selling domain names for fun and profit, mostly profit.
Tsufit, Author, Step Into The Spotlight!
Kesmodel weaves a gripping story of the players who evolved the domain industry.
Bill Jelen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By An Avid Domainer on August 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Having been in the domain name market for many years now, I am an avid domainer. Consequently, I was anxious to read this book. While the author writes well, it was "useful" content that was lacking. At minimum, the first 75% of this book is dedicated to the history of how domain names came to be today.
The subtitle for this book is "How People Get Rich From Internet Domain Names." My impression was that this book would be focused on new insights, new leads, new ways of working with my names to enhance my knowledge. But, after reading this book in its entirety, I do not feel that was the case. A great deal of this book is dedicated to the bygone days of a few successful domainers who got on board "very" early and their subsequent stories. While their stories were interesting, today those circumstances would be impossible to duplicate - which was to purchase a large inventory of "one word," exceptional names, rather inexpensively.
Additionally, there are many pointed references to those few people and companies who tried to cheat the system. It seems no matter what industry it is, there are always those that push the boundaries. While they are discussed at length, again I would have much rather read sound, constructive ideas, as implied by the books subtitle.
Lastly, I do not agree with many points of the final chapter.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Neal R. Voron on June 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
Many of us have a valid excuse why we missed an early wave of opportunity to invest - or invest more heavily - in Internet domain names. We may have had no idea what was happening and what we were missing out on, or we may have had a clue but could not quite grasp how to get a handle on it. With David Kesmodel's "The Domain Game" now available, though, there are few excuses to sit on the sidelines anymore!

Some books focus on one industry but are really about so much more. They are about people, about business, about life. They are about how one's perspective, creative thinking, actions, and persistence can make a difference in his or her success. "The Domain Game" is one such book, and I highly recommend it both as an insightful view into the world of domaining and as an interesting and enlightening story that is worth reading whether you know what a domain name is or not.

Kesmodel, a staff reporter for the Wall Street Journal's Chicago bureau who formerly worked as technology reporter for the Journal's online edition, expertly weaves Internet domain name industry facts and history into the context of events, sharing the true stories of successful domainers. He tells how individuals of varied educational and work backgrounds found success through foresight, smart thinking, and/or aggressive pursuit of domain names that they acquired for prices as low as under $10 to many thousands of dollars.

But Kesmodel doesn't stop there - he offers insights into opportunities that exist in domaining today, and he introduces readers to many key players and domain industry resources.

Readers who know nothing about Internet domain names beforehand will sooner or later realize that they could have hand-registered a couple of ".
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tsufit, Author, Step Into The Spotlight! on September 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
On page 83 of <a href="[...]">Step Into The Spotlight!, </a>I admitted that I have 503 domain names. My friends are ready to send me to "Domain Names Anonymous", but I stand my ground. They're not making any more lakefront and they're not making any more .coms. But in the past few months, I let a couple of hundred of them go, scrutinizing each one and really asking myself if I was going to use 'em to market my business. That's what domain names are for...aren't they?

I wish I'd had a copy of David Kesmodel's new book <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Domain-Game-David-Kesmodel/dp/1436332281/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1_s9_rk?ie=UTF8&s=books&s9r=8a10809b18796943011a88e87c5a406e&itemPosition=1&qid=1220281079&sr=8-1">"The Domain Game"</a> at the time. It's a fascinating history of the high stakes game of buying and selling domain names for fun and profit, mostly profit. The characters are as colorful as Damon Runyon's gamblers (brought to life in <em>Guys and Dolls</em>) from a watermelon farmer to a young reclusive guy who's near impossible to contact. There's intrigue, drama--all the elements necessary for a Hollywood blockbuster.

Those looking for a detailed "how to" on how to get rich from domain names may walk away disappointed and I must admit at a certain point, I did "cut to the chase" by skipping straight to the last chapter, ie the <em>what can be done today</em> portion of the show. But the narrative was gripping enough that I did go back and read what I missed. And I learned a lot. I gotta congratulate this guy, Kesmodel. He's a journalist and he got people to spill their secrets, big time. And I did put the book down several times to run to the computer and renew some of my almost-expired names. Well worth the read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Sullivan on January 31, 2014
Format: Paperback
I'll admit, when I first read the title of this book several years ago, I expected it to teach me how to buy and sell domain names for profit. I was wrong, but it provided me with a very thorough history of domaining and a foundation that has severed me well.

The book opens with some interesting stories of the early domaining days and Internet successes. A watermelon farmer with a vision, a bankrupt furniture salesman (Rick Schwartz) with forward looking business sense and many more similar stories. All presented in a way that paints a historical and promising view of the dawn of domaining. We learn about the Network Solutions, their struggles, and the birth of other registrars. The author presents ICANN and difficulties with dispute resolution. The evolution of pay per click advertising and the companies/people behind it. We see how picking up names on the drop became a strategy that some were better at then others. I found the large domain portfolio owners stories most interesting and the processes they went through to collect and sell their names.

This is the most well documented history of the domain industry that I have found.
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