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The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell Paperback – 1963


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Harper Colophon Books; 1ST edition (1963)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8087888006
  • ISBN-13: 978-8087888001
  • ASIN: B000GX05RO
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #956,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mikhayla on November 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
"Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell" is the first door into a variety of research topics including: Psychodelic drugs generally, the unethical research done by the C.I.A. during their MKULTRA project (see "In Search of the Manchurian Candidate" by John Marks) and the spiritual "trips" of Native traditions, (see "The Teachings of Don Juan" by Carlos Castaneda).Doors of Perception is an intelligently written work of art.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
I first read this book when I was a senior in high school, and gave an oral presentation of it before the class. As I had read Huxley's classic work Brave New World the previous year, this book seemed a natural choice, and may have been the first book that was the second book by an author that I had read. I was in "way over my head," sort of realized it, but I did have that school assignment to complete, and so I did. I can remember that the English teacher was somewhat anxious about what I was saying, but when I assured him that of course I would never actually try to do what Huxley did, he seemed relieved, and gave me an "A" for the presentation.

Decided to give it a re-read now, a book that was written in the `50's, so that I might understand what he was trying to say, as well as to see how the book "aged." At one level, it is a paean to the drug mescaline. Huxley took a measured dose, under supervision, and describes what he felt and saw. And it was a lot, including an intensity of colors. Huxley posits that the brain has a "filter" which normally eliminates much of what is available from our perceptions since it has no "survival" value. Mescaline, which derived from the peyote cactus, was, and I'm sure is still used by American Indians in their religious ceremonies. The author points out that other religions have similar mechanisms that might induce a similar state of increased perception... including obtaining "visions"... by fasting and repetitious chanting, for example, both of which make the brain "less efficient" in its filtering function.

It should be no surprise that Huxley referenced the work of that famed "visionary," William Blake.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Yano Bermann on September 1, 2013
Format: Library Binding
Lucy in the sky with diamonds.
It is not fashionable anymore to get there in that fashion. Peyote, LSD. And it is just as well.

Still I am happy super talented Aldous Huxley went and shared his travels with us.

It feels good to know it is there. I rejoice Huxley lived and wrote. Peace and love to him.
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Format: Library Binding
Length: 7:49 Mins
(Review by Dean Goranites of the BookReviewersClub.)

The book is about a research program involving a drug test. A company was looking for volunteers to participate in a drug study, and Huxley volunteered to join the program.

Basically, the story takes place within an 8 to 10 hour time period after Huxley consumes the drug "Mescaline." He then recorded the entire experience so that when he wrote this essay, he could give exact quotes of how he had felt while on the under the influence.

In the book, Huxley said he was not really concerned about space, which Dean found really interesting. He also liked the various details about life that Huxley discussed. Aside from that, Huxley was very focused on natural occurrences.

The whole book was really intriguing, and so Dean gave the book 5 stars.
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