The Double Game
Format: HardcoverChange
Price:$23.94+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 24, 2012
This is a very entertaining book.
It's well written, the characters are well developed, and the settings are real.
The references to spymasters of the genre make the book even more interesting.
This is a book I'll read again and enjoy as much the next time.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 23, 2012
I enjoyed The Double Game very much. It was interesting and cleverly written. I have only been a reader of spy stories for the past few months. However, for readers who have a large collection of this genre, they will find this book a real treat--a true test of their in-depth knowledge of the subject!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2012
I really enjoyed reading this book. As a fan of spy novels, I enjoyed the idea of a spy novel based in other countries and on other spy novels.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 23, 2012
This novel escaped me when it came out, so I won't repeat the info that 35 reviewers have noted. But I enjoyed it. I thought it was both clever and interesting. It was a nice romp, both through Europe, but also the spy novels cited and the spy era it covered. Dan Fesperman has written several good novels now, so I wait to see what he does next.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2013
First book I've read of Fesperman's. But since I've been reading spy novels or at least forty years, so many of the literary references he employs in this story had a comfortable familiarity. It is amazing how he wove a wonderful spy story from the threads of so many great spy stories.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on October 26, 2012
I simply tried and tried but could not get through the first act. References to all the great spy thriller authors and characters constantly infused and repeated over and over in the author's storytelling simply stopped the arc and flow of the narrative. I finally tossed it and went to sleep.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: HardcoverVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
If you enjoy old-fashioned spy novels, this might be just your thing. The premise is interesting, and the lines between fact and fiction are fuzzy at best. A Washington, DC-area journalist who grew up in Europe as the only child of a single-dad diplomat with an extensive collection of first-edition spy novels, manages to secure an interview with an elusive but prolific author of spy novels. The journalist learns for the first time that the author was friends with his father, and suspects the interview was granted as a favor to the father. In a weak moment, the author admits that he would have considered acting as a double agent. The journalist publishes this information, which starts him on a bit of a downward spiral.

Some time later, the journalist receives a obtuse clipping from a spy novel that appears to be taken from his own library. The clipping comes from an unknown source, and starts the journalist off on a treacherous path across europe, starting in Vienna with stops in Budapest and Prague. Along the way, the journalist has to follow the clues, which come in the form of snippets clipped from various novels, to complete his quest. There is danger at every turn, with mullet-haired assassins, hunched over and withered booksellers, a beautiful woman wearing a red flower, a dottering man in a seersucker suit -- all characters you might imagine in any stock spy novel. There are a number of twists and turns along the way, of course, but it all makes for a lively read.

I think this would be a particularly interesting book for someone who had read much of the genre and was familiar with the many references to authors and books herein. The author -- of The Double Game, not the author of spy novels who is a character in the book -- has really done his homework on the genre and includes references to various spy novels throughout the ages, dating back to the 1800s and James Fennimore Cooper. Interesting.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
"The Double Game" is a thrilling old-school espionage novel with roots stemming from other authors works of art. The storyline is sprinkled with famous names such as John le Carre, William Buckley and many others. The plot is intellectual and action driven and mirrors what the layman perceives as the work of real spies such as the CIA during the Cold War Era. It plays on the idea that a best-selling novelist was actually a CIA agent deeply embedded with the KGB of the time. With skillfully developed characters and a plot containing many twists and turns the author has adeptly switched back and forth in years and maintained an elevated sense of suspense, a real guessing game till the very last page.

Narrated in the first person by the protagonist, this smart and suspenseful story opens in 1984 with young journalist Bill Cage interviewing American espionage agent turned novelist Edwin Lemaster. His revelations will soon prove to be the catalyst and the end of Bill's career.

We jump in time to two decades later, when Bill is working in public relations spinning stories for his clients. One day out of the blue he receives an anonymous letter encouraging him to follow up on the 1984 allegations behind Lemaster's disclosure. This enticing and strange note is full of cryptic references to some of Bill's favourite spy novels and proves to be the first of many literary bread crumbs that eventually has Bill travelling to Vienna, Prague and Budapest. Deciphering each instruction is a maze of information, an adventure through spy novels that brings him closer to the truth.....

This story develops and is presented in a different manner it quickly draws you into the world of espionage by bringing back memories and the adrenaline rush created by classic spy novels.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: HardcoverVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Tremendous depth of character and story - highly recommended.

1984 (how apt!) twenty-seven year old Washington DC journalist Bill Cage is granted an interview with his boyhood idol, CIA from 1957-73, turned best-selling novelist of the past 20 years Edwin Lemaster. Lemaster left the CIA in '73, a month after his third book became a bestseller. (I didn't think you could work for the CIA and publish novels at the same time.)

The interview was enjoyable for both men and they spend the evening drinking and dining. Lemaster shares a brief intimate comment that it would have been exciting to be a double agent. Bill has secretly been recording the conversation. The next morning his editor tells him to run the story.

For some reason this is HUGE news that damages Cage and Lemaster's lives. Cage is dismissed by Lemaster as a "callow young hack" who used deception to make a story where none existed. Lemaster goes on to publish uber-patriotic novels that are not well received. (this we all learn in the first chapter).

Fast forward to 2010 in chapter two and Bill is in Public Relations, his journalist career snuffed out. He visits with his father, Warfield, now retired from the US State Department. Bill was an only child and raised by his father all over the capitols of Europe in the 60's/70's.

Bill receives a missive apparently typed on his own paper by his own typewriter offering him a paper chase of clues (to be found in old spy novels) that might reveal an even bigger story than the LeMaster interview in 1984.

There were so many things for me to enjoy. Spies & Double agents, Fathers and Sons, Truth & Intrigue. I liked the setting, the history, the relational story between father and son. I enjoyed the steady sometimes leisurely pace of each reveal.

Terrific ending.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 27, 2014
If you're a huge fan of the espionage genre you'd probably enjoy this book which has tons of references to previously published spy novels. I didn't get most of the references, thought the plot was confusing, and I didn't love the book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.