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The Ice Dragon Mass Market Paperback – October 2, 2007


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Mass Market Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Starscape; 1st edition (October 2, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765355396
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765355393
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.2 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #411,079 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3–5—Seven-year-old Adara was born during the coldest chill of the coldest year ever, a chill that killed her mother during the girl's birth. Ever since then, she has been a remote and chilly child, living for winter when the ice lizards come out and forming a bond with a mysterious ice dragon. When war comes and dragon-riding invaders threaten her home and family, the ice dragon helps her to thwart them, leading to its own demise. Filled with illustrations of swooping dragons and folks in medieval-type garb, this fantasy is a slim but rich introduction to the genre, one that should appeal to both boys and girls. Give it to readers who are not quite ready for Emily Rodda's "Deltora Quest" series (Scholastic) or to fantasy fans who want a quick but meaty read.—Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Praise for The Ice Dragon:

 

The New York Times Bestseller

 

“Martin’s charming tale is filled with passion and power…a touching adventure with all the taut storytelling skill one would expect from this award-winning author.” —January Magazine

 

“Martin goes beyond the expected to bring us an extraordinary children’s tale. A must-buy for all Martin fans, this is a good book for anyone…who loves winter and dragons.” —SFRevu


More About the Author

George R.R. Martin sold his first story in 1971 and has been writing professionally since then. He spent ten years in Hollywood as a writer-producer, working on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and television pilots that were never made. In the mid '90s he returned to prose, his first love, and began work on his epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire. He has been in the Seven Kingdoms ever since. Whenever he's allowed to leave, he returns to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he lives with the lovely Parris, and two cats named Augustus and Caligula, who think they run the place.


Customer Reviews

Saw it was by George R.R. Martin and had to have it.
ammermanii
Parents, if you are considering getting this book for your children, I'd just like to say this: make sure you read it with your child.
C. Lotspeich
It was slow to develop any kind of goal for the story or conflict for the main character to resolve and boring while we waited.
kelly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

183 of 191 people found the following review helpful By C. Lotspeich on September 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I got this book on Sept. 26th, 2006, in Dubuque, Iowa. George Martin was on a book signing for the release of this book, and due to this, the bookstore he was at was selling it early.

Let's start this review off with the obvious. The Ice Dragon is not another book in A Song of Ice and Fire. It's set in a different world, with none of the same characters, and has none of the adult content that those books do. In fact, this book is exactly what Martin said it would be from when he announced that it was being published separately: a children's book. Also, Martin didn't take much time off ASOIAF at all to write this book - in fact, it's been published in an anthology work (Dragons of Light) in 1980. All that has been changed is an editing to remove some of the more graphic content, and illustrations have been done.

Nonetheless, even though this is a children's book that most people who are used to Martin's work will read in about half an hour, the book is quite good. The story is touching, and is not afraid to hide kids from the realities of what can happen in life. There is symbolism a-plenty within this book, and a lot of different concepts to think about, especially for a young reader.

Parents, if you are considering getting this book for your children, I'd just like to say this: make sure you read it with your child. They'll want you there to explain a lot of what happens in the book. Martin, as usual, doesn't pull any punches with the emotional impact of the character's fate, and while I appreciate him not trying to hide the world from kids, some of the concepts may be difficult for them to grasp or easily misinterpreted.

Furthermore, the artwork within the book is stunning.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Appleseed VINE VOICE on October 16, 2006
Format: Hardcover
How interesting that Martin's short story, written in 1980, bears minor resemblances to his grand work of today.

While reading this, I had an image of Farmer Giles of Ham, by Tolkien, and wondered if a smart publisher would dig that up and sell it as a children's story. I would personally be very interested to see how well that book would do in today's environment. The Tolkien family, I'm sure, could always use the extra money. (That, of course, was a joke.)

This is a lovely story, and, as another reviewer pointed out, exactly what you would expect from Martin after toning down one of his short stories or novellas for younger readers.

In a world that seems mostly inhabited by "fire" dragons, the "ice" dragon in this story stands out starkly (pun intended for readers of ASoIaF). It appears to be a creature unsuited for its distinctive qualities, only capable of appearing and thriving in winter, and making land barren wherever it lands. Even its very distant cousins, the ice lizards, find themselves uniquely suited for ice and snow, any hint of warmth that touches them is like poison.

Adara, the seven-year-old main character of the story bears striking resemblances to both the dragon and the ice lizards. This isn't a straightforward story - there is a strong symbolic statement that runs quietly from the beginning of the story until the end.

It's truly a gorgeous tale from one of the most decorated writers in fantasy.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By P. Robinson on November 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Ice Dragon is a great little story. It was written long before the seven kingdoms had even been contemplated by Mr. Martin. His skills were clearly honed even then... This is the tale of a young girl with ice water coursing through her veins. She has no love, except that which she has for the cold winter. For that is when the ice dragon comes. A creature so cold that no human can touch it without their warm flesh melting its icy scales. No one but young Adara. The ice dragon remained her only friend - the only one who would visit her. Until one day when the helms of the intruders crested the horizon.

Adara must chose between the cold life that she loves, and the warmth which is coupled with uncertainty.

Buy this book for your daughter, and then after she is done with it, read it for yourself.

Relic113
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Midi on December 31, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The story was rushed and written for children. When it was over, I felt like there were holes in the story. Compared to other GRR Martin books, I felt a little cheated on character development but it might be a decent intro to Fantasy reading for a child.
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24 of 35 people found the following review helpful By J. Whelan on January 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This author of adult-oriented fantasy fiction seeks to prove to his predominantly-male fans that he can write for their little daughters too. He fails.

Martin normally writes for adults. It might not be 100% clear to online shoppers that this volume, when one actually gets one's hands on it, is clearly presented as a kid's book. It contains perhaps 20 to 30 pages of normal text, stretched out to over 100 pages by child-friendly formatting and numerous (but mediocre) pictures. The cover art, picturing a little girl riding an ice dragon, defines the target audience. I understand a different version of this tale, not specifically intended for kids, appeared in the "Dragons of Light" fantasy anthology in the 1980s. I have not read that version. I review this version as a kids' book, since that is what it purports to be.

The main character is a little girl, but the story is, at best, inconsistent about presenting things from the little girl's perspective. It could hardly be otherwise, for this little girl has a heart of ice, never smiles or laughs, and cares nothing for her family. She only loves the winter, and the Ice Dragon that is its personification. She seems quite satisfied with her situation, so we view her from without, as adults might, as a bizarre child with a strange abnormality.

At one point, someone acuses the father of being to blame for the child's strange condition. He is cold to the child (he is told) because he blames her killing her mother in childbirth, and this has caused the child's emotional coldness. The father defends himself again this charge: He loves his little ice girl most of all, but she is cold towards him, and so he is merely reacting to her behavior.
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