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The Duck Cookbook Hardcover – October 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Stewart, Tabori and Chang; First Edition, First Printing edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584792957
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584792956
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #446,111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

As a veteran cookbook author and culinary school instructor, Peterson (Glorious French Foods and Essentials of Cooking) brings to the table this lavish cookbook dedicated to the consumption of waterfowl. Beautifully illustrated with close-up photographs of each dish, the volume covers the all the possible methods for cooking duck: sauteing, braising, roasting, confit, smoking and curing. First, however, Peterson begins by explaining the varieties of duck (as well as how to cut it up) in the simple, elegant prose style for which he is known. While he incorporates many types of cuisine into his recipes, his influence is largely French. He offers a traditional Duck a l'Orange, for example, made with kumquats and Grand Marnier, as well as a traditional Cassoulet with Duck Confit. He also includes dishes such as Pappardelle with Duck Sauce, Duck Sausages, and Duck Prosciutto with Figs. He surprises with recipes that balance the duck's heaviness, such as Duck Confit Spring Rolls and Duck Legs with Thai Green Curry. This is a perfect book for fall cooking.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

James Peterson is the author of six award-winning cookbooks, including his most recent success, Sweet Wines (STC 2002). For 17 years, he taught cooking at the French Culinary Institute and at Peter Kump's Cooking School in New York City, and is today a frequent guest teacher at cooking schools.

More About the Author

James Peterson is an award-winning food writer, cookbook author, photographer, and cooking teacher who started his career as a restaurant cook in Paris in the 1970s. He is the author of fifteen titles, including "Sauces," his first book and a 1991 James Beard Cookbook of the Year winner, and "Cooking," a 2008 James Beard Award winner. He has been one of the country's preeminent cooking instructors for more than 20 years and currently teaches at the Institute of Culinary Education (formerly Peter Kump's) in New York. He is revered within the industry and highly regarded as a professional resource. James Peterson cooks, writes, and photographs from Brooklyn, New York.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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This is a very good one-ingredient book.
Jackal
Since I knew how to cook a whole duck, I figured it would not be difficult to cook just the breast, but failed miserably.
Angel A. Rebollo
This book is by far the most complete collection of duck recipes I could find.
B. Marold

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on December 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The title tells it all. This book is all about cooking duck using most techniques common to other types of meats plus at least one which is unique to duck and other fatty fowl. The nine techniques / preparations chapters are:
Sauteing
Braising
Roasting
Confit - a French cooking and preservation method unique, I believe, to ducks and geese
Smoking
Curing
Soups
Salads
Terrines and Mousses
It's interesting that while poaching is a common cooking technique for chicken, the technique is not included here for duck. This technique is largely replaced by the confit method. This is just one clue to the fact that a duck is different from a chicken and methods which work for one will not work for the other. The biggest difference is the level of fat in a duck's skin (but not in it's meat). This is simply due to the fact that ducks can fly and chickens cannot and ducks spend a lot of time in the water. This also explains why almost all duck meat is dark, more similar to a chicken's legs than to it's breast meat.
The difference between ducks and chickens is the main thing which makes this book valuable in itself, especially since many of the techniques appear to be unique to duck cookery. A second great value to the book is that it spells out the right way to cook to avoid fatty flesh if your primary interest is to avoid the saturated fat without loosing out on the great taste of duck.
Aside from the confit method, one of the best values derived from duck is the high quality of the broth one can make from duck, in many ways as valuable and as flavorful as stocks derived from veal. The only drawback is that to make a decent amount of duck broth, you need 12 carcasses or equivalent amount of leftover pieces.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Angel A. Rebollo on February 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I was intrigued with the idea of cooking duck breast, and after I tried and failed, I figured I could benefit from learning as much as possible about the different ways to cook duck. Since I knew how to cook a whole duck, I figured it would not be difficult to cook just the breast, but failed miserably. Consequently, I set out to look for a cookbook that would show me all the secrets of cooking duck.

This book not only did that, but it helped me understand what I did wrong. The recipe I used before purchasing the book was from Spain. Over there, is more common to buy a duck which is smaller than the one you get in the U.S., so I should have cooked at a higher temperature and a bit longer.

I recommend it to those who have never cooked duck before, as well as to those that are interested in gastronomic adventures beyond typical duck recipes.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Esther Schindler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've never met a duck I didn't like. If a restaurant has duck on the menu, that's the item I'll order. So buying a copy of The Duck Cookbook by James Petersen (I have several of his other cookbooks) was never really in question. What's surprising is that it took me years, YEARS to actually cook something from it.

Initially, I expected several variations on roast duck, smoked duck, etc. But Petersen actually has few recipes for a whole bird. He found that since the breast is generally overcooked by the time the legs are cooked, most recipes are for duck breasts or duck legs or duck in pieces. That could work fine if I had an easy-to-get-to source for duck parts, but the local supermarkets (even the gourmet stores) sell a whole duck frozen for a not-too-unreasonable price, or they sell small packages of (usually frozen) duck breasts for prices that take my breath away. Unless I'm ready to take a trip to the Chinese market downtown (where duck costs little more than does chicken -- which darnit is as it SHOULD be), I have few opportunities to buy, say, 6 duck legs.

This slowed down my opportunity to cook from The Duck Cookbook, though not my appreciation. The recipes are great -- or at least they seem so. Chapters are devoted to sauteing, braising, roasting, confit, smoking, curing, soups, salads, and terrines and mousses. They range from simple techniques (sauteed duck breasts) to elaborate variations (duck breast with blueberries, or duck breasts with chihuacle negro chiles, raisins, and almonds). There's plenty of recipes for items that use duck as an ingredient, such as hot-and-sour soup with duck (really, why haven't I made this already?!) or duck bouillabaisse.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lori on March 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love duck but could never find a satsifactory recipe for it. Along came The Duck Cookbook and my prayers have been answered. I have made well over half of the recipes and each one is better than the last. If you are a fan of duck, look no further than this wonderful book.
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