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The Dutiful Worrier: How to Stop Compulsive Worry Without Feeling Guilty Paperback – May 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: New Harbinger Publications; 1 edition (May 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1572248971
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572248977
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #318,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A professor of humanities at Indian River State College and clinical ethics at Florida State University College of Medicine, Cohen offers a guide for those who compulsively worry. He notes that such "dutiful" worrying is based on the anxiety of losing control of a situation, self-damnation, and perfectionism. Dutiful worriers often develop a "worry chain" founded on each of these three elements. Through anecdotes, hypothetical examples, and exercises, Cohen helps these "dutiful worriers" through their psychocognitive prisons. His last two chapters, "Making Moral Decisions" and "Acting Instead of Worrying," are his most useful. In the former, he examines how a person might deal with the inevitably anxiety-producing need to tell her mother that she has terminal cancer; in the latter, he offers a helpful five-step process when dealing with a seemingly unresolvable dilemma. Unfortunately, Cohen seems to condemn all worrying, not distinguishing the dutiful worrying from the more creative, problem-solving kind. Also, as in too many other self-help books, his style is marred by clichés, and is repetitive. Still, Cohen, a blogger for Psychology Today, does share some accessible practical wisdom, though he might have done so more succinctly. (Apr.)
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Review

The Dutiful Worrier is an excellent self-help book. It provides extremely helpful strategies for leading a less anxious and more fulfilling life. Lucid and cleverly organized into sections that make it easy to read and understand, it draws on the thoughts and findings of outstanding clinicians and scholars. I enthusiastically endorse and recommend The Dutiful Worrier.“
—Arnold A. Lazarus, PhD, ABPP, Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Clinical Psychology at Rutgers University and executive director of The Lazarus Institute in Skillman, NJ



“Worry, no matter how good the reason, is not healthy. As Albert Ellis stated, ‘Worry is itself one of the most painful conditions.’ Elliot Cohen shows how to use a four-step process to identify, refute, replace, and monitor well-meaning worry. I recommend you follow this four-step program and learn to concentrate on actual troubles and not the imaginary ones.”
—Jon Carlson, PsyD, EdD, Distinguished Professor in psychology and counseling at Governors State University in University Park, IL



“A unique book that gets at the meta-cognition underlying people’s compulsive worry: the belief that they must keep obsessing about future possibilities so that somehow in their ruminating despair they will discover the perfect solution. In addition, Cohen’s book provides one of the clearest and most succinct demonstrations I’ve ever seen of the four-step process for identifying and changing irrational beliefs—a great general introduction to CBT.”
--Janet L. Wolfe, PhD, former executive editor of the Albert Ellis Institute



“If you are tired of sweating things that never happen, this highly informative book is for you. Use the exceptional ideas and exercises within to free yourself from worry and to unleash a happier, more productive you. This may be the last book you’ll need on defeating worry.”
—William J. Knaus, EdD, author of The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Anxiety and End Procrastination Now


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christine McMullin on August 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've always been a worrier. And many people just tell me to stop, that it's silly. And, while intellectually I know that they're right (and coming from a good place), advice like that doesn't really help. Enter this book.

For people who are more analytical, this book is great. It gives practical "try this" exercises that you can implement day by day to help kick the worry habit. Cohen never makes you feel dumb for worrying. In fact, he explains how it's perfectly rational, given a certain outlook, but once you see that it's hurting you, not helping, you'll want to stop. His structure is logical and it's easy to follow (small exercises first, then you build). I've recommended this book to people like me who worry because they care, but want to stop.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a clinical psychologist and will start recommending this book to clients who are chronic worriers. I don't precisely agree with the author's conceptualization--I think people peersist in worrying because it gives them the illusion of control. So many of the dire things people worry about don't happen and it can feel like the worry warded it off. However, the author hit the nail on the head when he titled his book. One of the most significant irrational beliefs that promotes worry is the individual's idea that NOT worrying would be irresponsible. The book provides systematic exercises that seem very useful in eliminating the guilt associated with not worrying.
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Format: Kindle Edition
There is much well-founded insight in this work, gaining and sharing wisdom from rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) and the author's own variety of it, logic based therapy (LBT). However, the book is profoundly repetitive and could probably be reduced by at least sixty percent with no loss of clarity or depth.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is always that voice, that worry, that prevents us from being happy, to enjoying the moment, here are some basic keys, to help us get rid of these worries, such us, when a love one is sick, and that voice keeps telling us we don't deserve to be happy or at peace until our love one is ok, it helps us reframe our worries, to, how can I be helpful? How can I help? and take some action, instead of just ruminating on that problem, that just doesn't help anyone.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ANTHONY on May 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book seems to have the right idea, I just started it and I like the information I am receiving.. I cant wait to see what the author has to say about the cognitive techniques. This book looks like it will be a success in the world of worry. Best of luck people.
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