Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Earl of Louisiana Paperback – June 1, 1970


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, June 1, 1970
"Please retry"
$10.50 $4.70

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Malice Toward None
Featured New Release in Historical Biographies

Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Louisiana State University Press; 2 edition (June 1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807102032
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807102039
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,228 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A. J. Liebling was a staff writer for the New Yorker from 1935 until his death in 1963. During World War II, he served as a correspondent for the magazine in France, England, and North Africa. He wrote a number of books, including The Honest Rainmaker, The Sweet Science, and Normandy Revisited.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 12 customer reviews
A very funny, interesting and enjoyable book.
Michael R. Shannon
Still, Liebling is one of the great 2-initialed masters of 20th century literature, along with S. J. Perelman, H. L. Mencken, and P. G. Wodehouse.
M. Allen Greenbaum
A couple of the scenes in the movie 'Blaze' seem to be lifted from this book.
a foodie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Allen Greenbaum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 27, 2006
Verified Purchase
A. J. Liebling is one of my favorite authors; I first encountered his writing in his classic "low life" portrait, "The Telephone Booth Indian," and followed up with "The Sweet Science" (boxing), "Chicago: The Second City," and excerpts from his pieces on Paris' gourmet delights and the non-society horse racing crowd. Liebling specializes in the foibles and small triumphs of those on the fringes, regular working class men and women (mostly men), and even the lumpen-proletariot (somewhere lower than the worker). He does it with an engaging mix of reportorial detail and bemused, ironic observation. However, Liebling's not entirely dispassionate or cloaked behind his dazzling narrative ability. He has opinons and uses his words with precision and potency.

Given these talents and interests, the flamboyant, controversial Earl Long is a natural subject for Liebling. As a Northerner, Liebling tries to retain a certain acceptance, or at least empathy, towards the backroom deals, prejudices, personal attacks, and dishonesty in local politics. However, his overall tone is a grudging respect for Earl Long, even though his tactics and personality can be off=putting. Earl Long's melodramatics, his machinations and those of his opponents, are humorous and gut-level real, but at the same time we recognize the demagogery, and his divide and conquer fear-mongering and double-talk. He's clearly a master of being all things to most of the people, playing, for example, blacks against white and vice versa. At the conclusion, Liebling comes away with sympathy for Earl Long, trying to look at the results rather than his rhetoric.

All of this sounds rather heady, but that's probably just a result of Liebling's thought-provoking presentation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By a foodie on March 20, 2007
I was a kid in Louisiana when Uncle Earl was governor. When Earl started having some of his troubles (how's THAT for a euphemism?), several Northern journalists came down to write about (and laugh at) the Rube In Charge.

Liebling did so for the New Yorker, but he caught something most other journalists missed. Earl Long was remarkably progressive for the times, and was accomplishing some things no other Southern governor could. He had to balance many different factions to govern effectively, and he did so with a flair and flamboyance that's sorely missing in today's blow-dried politicos.

Liebling's prose is, as always, stellar. He's one of the few writers whose works I buy sight unseen. By now I have most of his stuff that's ever been printed. This book is Liebling at his best, which is head and shoulders above most writers.

A couple of the scenes in the movie 'Blaze' seem to be lifted from this book.

If this book whets your appetite for more Liebling, I heartily recommend 'Between Meals'. Written toward the end of his life, it's a beautiful reminiscence of a year he spent in Paris as a young man. Unforgettable.

Update May 2012: Everything I said in this review still goes, but there's a better deal out there now. Recently this book, The Earl of Louisiana, has been anthologized in a Library of America volume (No. 191) entitled "A.J. Liebling: The Sweet Science and other Writings". It includes The Earl of Louisiana, The Sweet Science (which Sports Illustrated once called the greatest sports book ever written), The Jollity Building (in which he lovingly portrays various con men, hustlers and other low-lifes working very hard to make an easy buck), and my personal favorite, Between Meals.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lee C. Krapin MD on October 5, 2007
Every man a king and every lady a queen...no not Huey..we're singing and reading the original ballad to earl k. long...no he wasn't crazy like Paul Newman in Blaze...no he wasn't a fascist...long before Bill Clinton and Jmmy C he stood up for Civil Rights even when the rest of the world thought he was crazy. Joe Liebling's book about LOng's banner years of 1959-1961 brings the last of the red hot poppas back to life along with a bygone age of Southern politics in a state where the two parties were Long and anti-Long. The book flows with poetic prose and political wisdom and is a perfect antidote from today's dull political characters seeking nomination. Sing, Louisiana, sing!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Schuyler T Wallace VINE VOICE on December 14, 2012
Verified Purchase
A.J. Liebling originally went to Louisiana to investigate the circumstances surrounding the forcible incarceration of its governor, Earl Long. Liebling considered him to be a "Peckerwood Caligula," a somewhat inglorious opinion considering he'd never met the man. Governor Earl Long, younger brother of the infamous Huey Long, was considered a talented politician. Far from being a hick, Long was an attorney who demonstrated considerable intelligence and skill in managing a complex state government.

Liebling soon found that Long had the gumption and scrappy disposition of a tomcat and the stubbornness of a southern mule. Long managed to con his way out of the state hospital, spending his recuperating time at race tracks and scheming for his old job in the state house. His lack of sophistication and seemingly yokel disposition were never a hurdle to his effectiveness as governor.

The author's book THE EARL OF LOUISIANA, a compilation of articles written for the "New Yorker," recounts the trials and tribulations of a politician trying to fight his way through the tangled web of southern politics in an effort to attain and keep power. The manipulations necessary to get votes from the diverse population of Louisiana have always been daunting, but Uncle Earl swept aside the webs of entanglement for three prior non-consecutive terms and was confident that, once again, he could manipulate the confusing double-primary system into another gubernatorial nomination. It ended up killing him; a heart attack ended his bid.

Liebling's book gets confusing as he tries to explain the politics Uncle Earl was involved in and I found the legal maneuvers hard to follow. One needs a scorecard to keep the players straight.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?