Buy New
$48.84
Qty:1
  • List Price: $58.00
  • Save: $9.16 (16%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Economic Laws of Scie... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $20.78
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Economic Laws of Scientific Research Paperback – February 15, 1997


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$61.77
Paperback
"Please retry"
$48.84
$48.84 $59.00



Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book is highly recommended reading or as a reference for anyone in science or technology...."--Dennis L. Feucht, Analogzone

"It is the first book by a practicing scientist to challenge the orthodoxy for decades, and should be read by those who are involved in science or merely wish to promote it." --Wall Street Journal (Europe)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 396 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 6th edition (February 15, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312173067
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312173067
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #191,459 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Roger I. Roots on December 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Kealey's "The Economic Laws of Scientific Research" is one of those great libertarian books that proves a difficult and counterintuitive thesis. Kealey's thesis: that science is best left to the private sector and that government funding of science is a curse in disguise. At first thought, this idea seems counterintuitive. Hasn't government funding of science produced all kinds of advancements in technology? What about the internet? the various benefits of NASA and the Defense Department? Kealey shows that all of these benefits have been produced through very inefficient means.
Private sector firms somehow manage to generate scientific discoveries at a far greater rate than the governments of the world despite having much less money. Kealey points to the fact that the U.S. has generated far greater scientific advancements (mostly through the many business firms that dot the U.S. landscape) than the former Soviet Union. The U.S.S.R. employed a very high percentage of the world's scientists and engineers for several decades, and yet failed in the technology race. Kealey demonstrates that there are sound sociological reasons for this.
Buy it; read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By maxlljoe@ozemail.com.au on July 12, 1998
Format: Paperback
Wow! A marvellously entertaining book, despite the horribly boring title. This must be one of the best exposures of the destructiveness of Big Government yet. Anyone who thinks that the free market is OK for making shoes and pizzas but that the really "serious stuff" like scientific research wont happen unless paid for by government should get a load of this book. From Roman times, through the Industrial Revolution to the present, the author shows that nearly all the important scientific and technological advances in history have come from private sources, from tradesmen or industrialists who had a "problem" and needed to fix it, and not from tax-funded laboratories. Worse than that, the more government has spent on science the slower has been economic growth. Should be required reading for all Ministers for Science Policy, not to mention Prime Ministers, Presidents and Heads of Treasuries.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By mironov@mindspring.com on August 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
It is a most systematical and wonderfully written apology for the introduction principles of market economy in the policy of basic science funding. The bad news: The logical application of this theory will resulted in the elimination of all economically uneffective state funded science agencies. The good news: This action will dramatically increase salary of good scientists. Why? Read this excellent book. All explanations are there. After publication of this book the future of system of State Socialism in Academia looks very dark. The best time for the system of state slavary is over.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the finest examples of literature that compares various political models and the scientific and economic progress that ensues. There is a clear free market bias to the author's writing, but this comes with a truckload of data and analysis dating back hundreds of years. As a result, it is very difficult to form logical arguments that dispute Kealey's findings, and most fail miserably, as you can easily see by reading the negative reviews for this book.

My only complaint is the title does the book no justice - we get more than economic laws of scientific research. We get succinct explanations of economic progress of humanity as a whole, how business and politics operate both together and apart, and a wholesale debunking of historic fallacies that persist to this day. The entire book is structured like a massive compendium of ammunition against protectionists, nationalists, socialists, and others who vainly attempt to control markets and inevitably corrupt them. This is most definitely the first book I will recommend to anyone looking to understand economics in general, and isn't afraid to tackle the data-heavy sections. I only wish it would come back in print.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again