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388 of 394 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very different weekly news magazine
Reading The Economist is a very different experience from that of reading the "big three"-- Time, Newsweek, and US News-- for two reasons.

First, it's a British publication, written in a very British manner. It's tone can vary from flatly dry to dryly ironic to jarringly blunt. There's nothing here that one can call politically correct; the authors and...
Published on June 2, 2007 by L. F. Smith

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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why not just write out a donation?
This magazine gets five stars, but Amazon's price is absurd. The Economist's website has a full year subscription for $98, so unless you were thinking about writing a straight donation check to Amazon.com, it isn't even worth considering.

Buy it elsewhere.
Published on December 1, 2006 by Gregory Amato


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388 of 394 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very different weekly news magazine, June 2, 2007
By 
L. F. Smith (E. Wenatchee, WA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Economist (Magazine)
Reading The Economist is a very different experience from that of reading the "big three"-- Time, Newsweek, and US News-- for two reasons.

First, it's a British publication, written in a very British manner. It's tone can vary from flatly dry to dryly ironic to jarringly blunt. There's nothing here that one can call politically correct; the authors and editors call 'em as they see 'em.

Second, it's a serious news magazine. Each issue is packed with stories about current affairs, politics, economics, and business. There are also book and movie reviews. However, there is almost no pop culture news and absolutely none of the celebrity gossip that has begun to corrupt the "big three."

It's important to understand that reading The Economist takes some commitment of time and effort, probably at least two or three hours an issue. Every article is deeply analytical, and many stories are revisited weekly for updates. This is a NEWS magazine, not a news MAGAZINE, if that makes sense.

The issue of political bias always arises with the media. The Economist takes definite stands on nearly every issue, and those editorial stands are clearly stated and defended. However, it is at the same time scrupulously fair and balanced. That's quite a trick, but the staff pulls it off week after week.

So, if you're ready and willing to spend some time reading thoughtful, thought-provoking, in-depth analysis of the news of the world, you won't find a better news magazine than The Economist.

(You might want to buy a copy on a magazine rack somewhere and check the subscription offers on the insert cards. They're almost certain to be better than the Amazon price.)
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197 of 205 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why can't we have this kind of news on TV!, September 7, 2004
By 
For close to 10 years now The Economist has served as my principal source of news. That's not to say my exclusive...I'm a news junkie. I probably watch 2 hours and read 2 hours of news everyday. However, if forced, I would probably concede 75% of my other news sources if it was between them and my Economist.

I love this magazine for too many reasons to list here, but among the most significant are these:

It's refreshingly opinionated. While I don't agree with plenty of the positions the magazine takes, they thoroughly and fairly examine each major perspective, then actually render an opinion. In an age when (in the US at least) major news sources claim to be unbiased (CNN, FOX, NY Times), but often drench you in bias via nuance, it's nice to at least know where the storywriter stands. I find I soak up much more information when I don't have to keep my bull**** filter on and parse out veiled opinion.

In addition to that, I think most will appreciate the compact nature of The Economist. Unlike most magazines (many of which are 2-4 times as voluminous, this one stays slim, yet in my opinion, manages to pack in 2-4 times more information. That inversion owes largely to the lack of advertisements that riddle most other comparable periodicals.

Lastly, but perhaps most importantly, The Economist is among the most diverse in its coverage of news worldwide. Each issue contains fascinating report from every big corner and small cranny of this bustling planet.

So, in summary, I'm a raving fan of The Economist. For those of you considering subscription, I highly recommend. For those of you who've already subscribed, congratulations...you may also want to consider checking out Wired Magazine. While a very different magazine, I regard Wired as a cool younger cousin of The Economist.

Enjoy,

Christian Hunter

Santa Barbara, California
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92 of 98 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Magazine In The World, April 3, 2007
By 
Anonymous (Denver, CO USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Economist (Magazine)
Bill Gates once said in an interview that he reads every page of The Economist. It's no coincidence that so do a lot of other smart and influential political, business, academic and media leaders throughout the world. If you want to know everything about everything, you need to start reading this on a weekly basis.

The Economist's tightly argued and balanced expository pieces illuminate realm after realm of the world's politics, history, economics, business, finance, books, arts, science and technology. Its often lighthearted, wry tone does nothing to conceal its serious purpose and curiousity in the progression of human events.

The magazine pulls no punches and offers a range of sharp, unsentimental opinions from its well-known free market, liberal democratic perch. I myself don't often agree with The Economist's take on things (though I even more often do--there's a lot of stuff in every issue). Nonetheless, I always respect its reasoning and objectivity.

Also, regular extensive readers like Mr. Gates know well and have almost come to depend upon the magazine's more tangibly personal benefits: imagine what the absorption and consideration of so much incisive argumentation and news background on a weekly basis does to the mind! At the risk of sounding a bit far-fetched, I always feel sharper and wiser when I've been reading The Economist.

I apologize for the effusiveness of this review, but if you can't tell by now, I can't say enough great things about this magazine. Highly recommended.
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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Truly Outstanding Magazine, May 31, 2007
This review is from: The Economist (Magazine)
I subscribed to The Economist over a year ago after having found myself purchasing copies at some six dollars per pop at local bookstores. The price for a magazine subscription was higher than I would normally pay (some two dollars per copy was the best rate I could locate). But the in-store issues I had purchased were just so good that I found myself returning every week for the next copy, and that was turning out to be TRULY expensive. So, I made the plunge for a subscription to try it out.

I was not disappointed. The Economist has turned out for me to be without doubt one of the best magazines to which I've ever subscribed. The publication reads more like a detailed world briefing than a magazine, and its coverage of events from around the world is impressive in nearly every respect. I find that a weekly perusal of the magazine has broadened my horizons immeasurably, allowing me to learn about important people, events, and issues both within and outside the North American context. It is a publication that I look forward to reading each week, and it has shown me how very little "news" one gets by simply sitting down in front of the television (which has a significant portion of its time dedicated to running inane commercials, and the rest a playing of little "news reports" that are cycled endlessly, even over days) and assuming that what one is receiving is the sum of the news for the day. (It isn't.)

The Economist breaks up its print edition each week into geographical regions (The United States, the Americas, Europe, The Middle East and Africa, Asia, and Britain) and other topical categories (International, Business, Finance and Economics, Science and Technology, Books and Arts, Obituary, and Economic and Financial Indicators). There are also the regular weekly repeating columns, such as "The World this Week" (a summary digest of the world's news in short paragraphs). Opinion pieces each week include Charlemagne (covering issues within the European Union), Bagehot (covering Britain), Lexington (covering the United States), and Buttonwood (covering financial issues), in addition to current issues of interest (recent issues focused on Sarkozy's bid for the French Presidency, and The Economist openly supported Sarkozy, even printing one issue with Sarkozy in the place of the famous Napoleon portrait by David). In addition, the magazine regularly publishes "special features," insets to the magazine, typically some 15 pages in length, covering either a specific region of the world, a city, or a financial issue. Many of these special features are also available as individual reprints for educational use.

Most articles in The Economist are just the right length to make sitting down with the issue for half an hour a day the perfect schedule for working through the magazine in time for the next weekly issue to arrive. A web-based edition of the magazine, complete with a searchable index of articles that have appeared in the magazine over the years in addition to the current issue, is available free to all print subscribers (one must use the customer number from the print edition to create the free online account). This is a perfect magazine for daily reading.

In a day and age when publications seem to be getting dumbed-down by the minute, The Economist is a place where one can find a comprehensive review and digest of news from around the world. We don't have to agree with all the perspectives the magazine takes, but we can certainly benefit from the outstanding coverage the publication provides. Reading it each week becomes an education in itself, and due to its wide-ranging scope, I now realize that purchasing my own subscription was a truly "economical" thing to do.
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43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite news magazine by far, June 19, 2002
By 
The Economist rarely disappoints. Unlike the fluff that fills the pages of Time, USNWR, and Newsweek, the Economist covers news that's fit to print, not just what will sell magazines (i.e. no celebrity photos, no "God Bless America" patriotism, no health-news infotainment, and no avalanche of advertising that falls out of the magazine when you pick it up.). Unlike Business Week and other business news sources, the Economist isn't into stock picking, cheesy management books, hot sectors, and celebrity investors. The Economist is about facts, about reporters doing real research, and about consistent excellence.
Time, Newsweek, and friends may have their place in the dentist's waiting room, but when I want to know what's going on in the world, or gather facts to make an opinion, the Economist is the first news source at hand.
The Economist has
* detailed news on events all over the globe
* heads of state, nobel prize winners, company leaders, and informed citizens' opinions on the letters page
* long surveys of difficult problems (corporate finance problems, Chinese political reform, open source software)
* real criticism on policies and plans
* accessible ways to understand complex concepts (i.e. explaining purchasing-power parity by comparing the prices of Big Macs in various countries)
* remarkably fresh language for such a serious news source
I've been reading it for years, starting from high school debate, college libraries, and borrowing copies from friends. After graduating, I bought it from newstands for a year, and a few months back I gave in and got a three year subscription. It's expensive, but I'm sure it's money well spent.
Besides saving money by subscribing, print subscriptions often include online access, as well. I haven't used it yet, but I imagine the searchable archives are excellent for research.
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113 of 125 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps the world's greatest magazine, November 2, 2001
By 
Timothy Walker (Orlando, Florida USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This may be the most difficult review I ever write, for what can be said about this publication that anyone who reads these words does not already know? The title suggests news of interest only to accountants and bankers, so the insightful views of world affairs found in every issue go unappreciated by all but few.
A shame, for this is truly a great magazine.
What the Times is to daily news, what the New Yorker is to culture, that is what the Economist is to international affairs, business, and politics. Published in London, the Economist is free from the subtle corruption ever present in American corporate-sponsored magazines, providing a truly objective view of U.S. policy each and every week. (I can not speak for British readers, but they seem just as objective when discussing European affairs).
Put down the advertisement-rich and content-free magazines you force yourself to read. Get the magazine that sustained Nelson Mandela in prison. Get accurate reporting and real insight into the world you live in. GET THE ECONOMIST.
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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apotheosis of Common Sense, October 31, 2001
By 
Christopher (Seattle, Washington, USA) - See all my reviews
As an ultra-demanding reader with a dearth of time, I was ecstatic to find this magazine. The Economist introduced me to the subject of globalization in 1998, and I've been hooked ever since. This is my guidebook to informed living on planet Earth.
The Economist is not a finance periodical... it is well-nigh a -book- of analysis, completely current, spoken with one editorial voice, the voice of reason, common sense, and good humor. The name 'Economist' represents this weekly's founder's heartfelt belief that human value is a worthy cause, that everything can be expressed in terms of a holism of human values, and that every single significant event -should- be given this measurement. Every world happening has meaning to the economy of human life. Good and bad are real... no moral relativism here.
You can throw out your copy of Time, Newsweek, and the New York Times (including Sunday and the magazine). Compared to the Economist, all other U.S. periodicals (unfortunately) are nothing but a pose--and I'm a red-blooded American, raised in South Dakota... trust me, the Economist is a magazine everyman can approach and know.
News doesn't have to be a duty... this magazine makes it a delight. Save yourself some money and a heap of time, and gain your citizenship in the world. A+ publication!
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The global perspective, April 9, 2008
The Economist is a British weekly news and international affairs magazine which contains high quality articles on current affairs, economy, business, and some science and technology. It contains articles that cover many countries and regions of the world. The articles are often analytical in nature and do not reflect any obvious political bias despite the fact that the economist takes an argued editorial stance based on classical liberalism. The target readership is educated people in general (not just economists or business people).

The Economist also contains interesting financial data and statistics of various kinds. The economic and financial indicators are published at the end of the magazine in every issue. The statistics is often used to compare countries, economically, politically, socially, and in other respects, which is something I am personally interested in. The magazine is sold extensively in both Europe and North America. Some people in Europe consider the Economist to be "conservative" and some people in North America consider it "secular humanist". In my opinion both viewpoints are more or less correct. I used to read Newsweek, Time and the U.S. News, and I still do sometimes, however, the Economist is a more interesting magazine that is still easily accessible. Reading the Economist is for me, one of the best ways to relax.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Coverage of Economics, Politics, & World Events, January 8, 2002
Echoing the comments of many previous reviewers, The Economist provides the best balanced, analytical coverage of current events in all of journalism. The only magazine comparable in the U.S. is U.S. News & World Report and The Economist provides a more detailed and worldly perspective. If you are an IR/ Econ/ Political Science student or professor, you should subscribe to this magazine. It's weekly arrival is all you need to satisfy a thirst for more than a superficial coverage of world events received from watching 30 minutes of CNN. As a former economics instructor, I frequently referred to The Economist for timely, balanced, in-depth coverage of political and economic events throughout the world, including the U.S. & the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the other major regions of the globe.
If you manage a tight budget, as many college students do, you can subscribe online to the economist.com and receive a fair amount of material for free. If you subscribe online, the economist.com charges $59 annually (about half of what a print subscription costs). Registration is free on their website, and subscribers can receive weekly emails of "This Week in Politics" and "This Week in Economics" for free, as well. Readers can also sign up for "The Global Agenda" which arrives three times per week and highlights certain free access articles pertaining to current events in the world.
The Economist presents the most thorough coverage of world events, providing scholarly, witty journalism for the informed citizen (of any country). Get it in your mailbox or on the web if you can't afford the print subscription fee. You won't be disappointed.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favorite World News Magazine, October 2, 2003
I read a lot of news magazines and financial publications but the Economist is my favorite by far. This magazine, which originated in England, mixes together eye- catching economic statistics, important world news, and volatile political situations into one complete magazine.
Unlike other news magazines, The Economist is very thorough and very analytical. Instead of just rambling on about an issue and talking in superficial ways, the Economist presents the hard facts. And to help readers get a better understanding, many of these facts are backed up with graphs, tables, and charts throughout the magazine. Since I am interested in the subject of economics and I have studied it extensively in school, I particularly like these graphics and tables. They really help to drive the point home.
There's only one bad aspect I can think of with this magazine: the high price. The cover price is $4.95 and a subscription for a year costs more than $100. This is more than double the price of other news magazines, and the cost alone will likely deter many potential readers from giving this magazine a look. I think is's worth the extra cost to get something that's higher in quality, but others will disagree.
The Economist, in a nutshell, is a very serious, very intelligent magazine intended for those who want a little more substance and who prefer reading the facts. It's an informative read; educating and fascinating in its coverage of world leaders, world events, and economic changes on a global scale.
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The Economist (1-year auto-renewal)
The Economist (1-year auto-renewal) by The Economist Newspaper Group, Inc.
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