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The Edge of Ruin Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 27, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; Emily Weiss Mystery edition (April 27, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312575203
  • ASIN: B005X4EWZW
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,120,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

IRENE FLEMING lives in Lambertville, New Jersey, with her musician husband and their cat. Writing as Kate Gallison, she has three private eye novels and five traditional mysteries to her credit. She is a member of Sisters in Crime, Mystery Writers of America, the Authors Guild, the Hunterdon County Board of Elections and the Episcopal Church. She is an avid fan of silent movies.


More About the Author

Winner of the New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance fiction prize for The Edge of Ruin, Kate Gallison writes the Emily Daggett Weiss silent movie mysteries under the name of Irene Fleming. Writing as Kate Gallison, she has three private eye novels and five traditional mysteries to her credit. Her Mother Lavinia Grey stories were the talk of the Episcopal Church.

Irene at various times has worked for the Washington Post, John Wanamaker, the Trentonian, Dwyers Stationers, and the State of New Jersey. She is an avid early film buff. Her 8X great-grandmother was a convicted Salem witch.

(Photo by Maureen A. Vacarro)

Customer Reviews

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It will definitely go into my cart.
Kay
"The Edge of Ruin" is a must read for those who enjoy historical mysteries and old-fashioned, Agatha Christie-like whodunits.
J. B. Hoyos
It's a combination that works well for Fleming, allowing the story to flow and the characters to take center stage.
Kathleen S. McVay

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Koch VINE VOICE on May 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The year was 1909.

Emily Weiss was sitting at home, when her husband, Adam walked in and made a big announcement. One that would change their lives forever. He tells Emily that they are moving to New York. He plans to make a movie.

Emily and Adam decide to make a Western titled Revenge in the Saddle. It features an eccentric cast of characters from Indians, who have no acting experience to Vera Zinovia, a famous diva, Fast-handed Bob, who can't keep his hands off the bottle, Erno Berg, the sexy male lead.

Seamus Duffy works as a Trust Detective like a Pinkerton. He is on set to watch over the proceedings. When Duffy's body is found with a railroad stake in him, it is Adam who is the prime suspect

What do you get when you combine old Hollywood glamour, Western flair and really good writing...The Edge of Ruin by Irene Fleming. I liked this book. It was like a story within a story. I like that Emily had a take charge attitude. She really showed that not just men can produce a movie. All of the different characters really came alive and shined in this book. There were so many different and interesting people that I couldn't choose a favorite. Reading this book, I was playing out the scenes as if I was watching the plot play out in my mind in the form of a black and white movie. Don't miss your chance to check out a really good book with The Edge of Ruin.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Esther Schindler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
After re-reading Barbara Hambly's Bride of the Rat God, which takes place in 1920s Hollywood pre-talkies, I realized that I had read very few novels about the early movie industry (though arguably The Invention of Hugo Cabret is one of them) and went hunting for a few fun alternatives. I'm glad I discovered Irene Fleming's The Edge of Ruin, because it was just what I hoped for: credible characters, a good whodunnit, and a historical context that let me learn something new.

Our basic story: It's 1909, and Emily Weiss is a new bride who is reasonably well-off. That is, until her husband declares that he's sick of running the string of Nickelodeon houses and wants to make films himself. So he has sold everything and committed their savings to a business deal in which the couple will deliver four movies in just a few weeks... or lose everything.

That might be hard enough to cope with -- even with the plucky Emily willing to write the scenarios, find actors, and make other arrangements -- except that the new company must also fly under the radar of Thomas Edison. Edison's company holds the patents for some of the essential film-making equipment, you see, and is not beyond sending tough guys to rough up the competition. Then one of said Toughs ends up dead, Emily's husband is accused of the murder, and she has to both finish the movies AND clear his name.

The end result is a story that manages to be both breezy -- this is VERY easy-to-read -- and darkly realistic, with side discussions of union disputes and socialism and living conditions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kay on September 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a great mystery! This was a delight from page one but just don't do what I did -- read it too fast. Sit back with a cup of coffee or tea and savor every word. The characters are wonderful, realistically drawn. I instantly felt for Emily and my fingers itched to slap her husband's handsome face. But you can't really get mad at Adam. He'll sweep you up with his optimism. I hope there is another novel coming soon from Ms. Fleming. It will definitely go into my cart.
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Format: Hardcover
In November of 1909, Emily Weiss is dismayed when her husband Adam sells his chain of nickelodeons and most all of their worldly possessions. The Weisses move from Philadelphia to the Knickerbocker Hotel in Manhattan. Adam quickly establishes an independent film company, Melpomene Moving Pictures, and begins shooting on the nearby cliffs of Fort Lee, New Jersey. He has only a few weeks to deliver four completed films to his silent partner, Howie Kazanow, or become financially ruined. Meanwhile, he must outsmart Thomas Edison's Pinkerton agents who torment independent film directors, destroying their reels of film and sometimes torching their studios.

It seems no one can resist the allure of starring in a film, not even an unsavory Pinkerton agent such as Seamus Duffy. During the filming of a Western mob scene, someone fatally stabs Duffy. Could the killer be a member of the cast and crew of Melpomene or one of the populace of Fort Lee? Nevertheless, Adam is charged with murder and thrown in jail. Poor Emily is left alone to solve the murder and finish directing the films on the precipitous cliffs despite vicious agents and a murderer who continues slashing members of the cast. Time is running out and Emily is brought ever closer to the edge of ruin and to the edge of death itself.

Irene Fleming's "The Edge of Ruin" transported me back in time to the tumultuous, cutthroat world of the silent film industry. Imprisoned within the pages of her novel, I felt utterly spellbound as mysterious events quickly unfolded. The underappreciated Emily is forced to risk everything she has to help her husband realize his dream of becoming an independent film director. Her life is constantly in peril.
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