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The Egg and I Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reissue edition (June 24, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060914289
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060914288
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A longtime resident of Washington State, Betty MacDonald (1908-1958) authored four humorous, autobiographical bestsellers and several children's books, including the popular Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books.


More About the Author

A longtime resident of Washington State, Betty MacDonald (1908-1958) authored four humorous, autobiographical bestsellers and several children's books, including the popular Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books.

Customer Reviews

ALSO a movie with MA&PA KETTLE.
okii
This is certainly one of the funniest books I've ever read.
doneal@shambhala.com
I read this book over and over about fifty plus years ago.
Laurie Bentley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Sandra D. Peters on July 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I can remember my mother reading this book fifty years ago, and even though she has long since passed away, to this day I can still hear her laughter while reading this book.

The more years that pass and the more technologically driven we become, the more hilarious "The Egg and I" becomes. Moving from a city to "the boonies" to raise chickens on a chicken farm is quite a challenge, especially in the 1940's which is the setting for this book. No electricity and no indoor plumbing are quite a jump from modern civilization even in that era. Of course, in that day, women were expected to be obedient wives, prepared to follow their husband's wild and sometimes bizarre dreams no matter where they may lead. The author tells it all in a matter of fact way, with a spicy, witty sense of humour. Almost every page will keep the reader laughing out loud. It is easy to see why this book remains popular 61 years after it was first published! Betty MacDonald is no longer with us, but her memory lives on and still continues to bring us joy and laughter through her books. Also recommended is her book, "Onions in the Stew."
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Sue Welk on January 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
For three days I read this book with a grin on my face and laughter in my belly. Towards the end of the book I was actually laughing out loud, with no one around to hear my glee. Betty describes, in wonderful detail, life on a chicken ranch and life with neighbors and various animals. Since I grew up in the country and my parents on a farm, I could relate to her wonderful descriptions of the sunrise and wild animals. I enjoyed it thoroughly and recommend this delightful read to anyone. (And I learned a few things about chickens as well.)
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50 of 54 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 11, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the funniest books ever written, The Egg and I is all the more remarkable because it sounds completely contemporary, even though it was written more than 50 years ago and describes events that took place more than 70 years ago. MacDonald had a relentlessly clear eye, a sharp, witty writing style and in her own way was as liberated as was possible for her time (she was divorced and a single mother when such things were considered heinous). And I'd like to say one thing: although she does write disparagingly of some Native Americans living in her area, I think this is more due to a specific dislike of certain people she met rather than a blanket prejudice (early in the book she talks about her love and admiration for the Plains Indians who lived near her childhood home). I think McDonald was a singularly unbiased person, something also unique for a white woman of her era; one only has to read about the close friendships she made with Japanese-American and African-American women in "The Plague and I" (her account of her stay in a tuberculosis sanitarium) to realize this. No misguided PC agenda should deter anyone from reading MacDonald's irreverent and hilarious stories. She was a terrific writer.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. Nelson on January 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
It is hard to image anyone NOT liking this book! Even if you don't know a thing about raising chickens or even if you do (I have given this book to two chicken-raising relatives!), this book is hilarious. I mean, I laughed out loud! Quite frankly, it is the best of her books for adults. Maybe that's because I could imagine life for a young, unsuspecting city girl in the untamed Northwest, trying to make a go of a life and a marriage she was clearly unsuited for. Sounds rough, huh? But Betty makes it fun, crazy and adventurous! Yes, it is true the language and depiction of the surrounding Native Americans can be rather off color. In fact her daughters mention this in the introduction of later printed versions of this book. Please try to take it with a grain of salt, for the times were different back then (the story takes place far before it was actually written) and I am sure if Betty were alive today her tone would be much more politically correct and sensitive. For this is not a story of a spoiled, racist girl in the wilderness, but rather the memoirs of a very funny and gifted young woman just trying to follow her mother's advice for a happy marriage by supporting her husband's career choice. I think this book is timeless and a must read no matter what generation you are from.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Paul A. Dunphy on September 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Although Betty McDonald writes with a great deal of wry humor (some might say sarcasm) about her situation on a Washington chicken ranch in the late 1920s and early 1930s, there is a rather sad undercurrent to the story. This is the story of a woman who has been led to believe that her husband is the master and that she must follow blindly where he leads. Though her retrospection includes humorous description, the unraveling of her marriage is obvious thoughout the narrative.
For those who find her description of Native Americans offensive, one must recall the time when this was written. Americans weren't as "enlightened" (now there is sarcasm!!)as we are now. I don't agree with those who find her "snobbish" - Mrs. McDonald was a fish out of water and knew it but couldn't just walk away from it. She cares about her neighbors, the Kettles and the Hicks, but she just doesn't fit in with them.
She is definitely showing us that country life has a definite downside.
Her description of the natural surroundings is vivid and makes you feel the terrain with her.
I would recommend this book to young women today just to show how far they have come since that time.
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