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The Emergence of the Moundbuilders: The Archaeology of Tribal Societies in Southeastern Ohio Paperback – February 28, 2005


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The Emergence of the Moundbuilders: The Archaeology of Tribal Societies in Southeastern Ohio + Ohio Archaeology an Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio's Ancient American Indian Culture
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 229 pages
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press; 1 edition (February 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0821416103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0821416105
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,797,960 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This work’s anthropological perspective goes beyond more traditional treatments of prehistory. The focus on the tribal level of socio-political organization is particularly noteworthy. The result is an updated and very useful treatment of Hocking Valley prehistory.”
— Brian G. Redmond, Director of Science and John Otis Hower Chair of Archaeology, The Cleveland Museum of Natural History

About the Author

Elliot M. Abrams, a professor of anthropology at Ohio University, has conducted field research for more than two decades in Mexico, Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize, as well as in the Ohio River Valley. He is the author of How the Maya Built Their World.

AnnCorinne Freter is a professor of anthropology at Ohio University and has conducted archaeological research since 1982 in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and the Ohio River Valley. She is the coauthor of Copán: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Mayan Kingdom.

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By S. Crane on February 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Native American societies experienced a rich process of cultural innovation in the millennia prior to recorded history. Societies of the Hocking River valley in south eastern Ohio, part of the Ohio River valley, created a tribal organization begining about 2000bc.

This book presents the process of tribal transformation and change in the region based on all available archaeological data from the Hocking River Valley. It begins this sequence of societal change at the Late Archaic period, around 3000 BC, when people lived in nomadic hunting and gathering communities, and ends at the Late prehistoric period, about AD 1450, as communities of settled maize agriculturalists developed. Each chapter details this process based on time-specific data, and accordingly the book chapters are arranged chronologically, moving through time to facilitate the analysis of cultural change.
The overarching theme of each chapter is drawn from anthropology, linking societies from each time period to a broad model considering the emergence and expansion of tribal institutions. Each chapter contributes more data and analysis to document the process through which the descendants of nomadic hunting and gathering societies eventually became sedentary agriculturalists.

Drawing on the work of scholars in archaeology, anthropology, geography, geology, and botany, the collection of papers addresses tribal society formation through such topics as the first pottery made in the valley, aggregate feasting by nomadic groups, the social context for burial of the dead in earthern mounds, the formation of religious ceremonial centres and the earliest adoption of corn.

Suites of regular radiocarbon dates confirm the aerliest use of pottery.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Alden on August 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
I agree with the "Kiwi Guy" when he calls this a book for post-graduate anthropology students and researchers. Just look at Amazon's "Inside this book - key phrases" to see for yourself. I would have to disagree with his statement that this is a good second book on the subject for the general public, though.

The book might more accurately be titled "Studies in the Archaeology of Ohio's Hocking River Valley", although that is certainly less catchy than the title it has. The editors say "scholarship from various arenas in archaeology is assembled to produce this nearly five-thousand-year narrative in the Hocking Valley." As such, it is an important contribution to the subject: an intensive study of one small portion of the region-wide mound-building tradition known as Adena and of the succeeding tradition known as the Hopewell Interaction Sphere.

The editors also say "the primary goal of this volume was to present our most current data analyzed through modern technologies to better understand the ecological contexts and processual patterns that characterized the formation and expansion of indigenous tribes in the Hocking Valley." In this they have succeeded.

Finally, the editors are to be commended on their commitment to publish and their desire "to produce chapters that are readable by the interested layperson". The topic is a fascinating one and still very much under-appreciated by the American public. If you consider yourself, as I do, an "interested layperson", just borrow the book from your library and focus on the last chapter, which neatly summarizes what the authors have to say.
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