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The Emperor's Virtual Clothes: The Naked Truth About Internet Culture Hardcover – January 9, 1995


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books; 1 edition (January 9, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565120965
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565120969
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,211,971 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this skeptical look at the Internet, Moore, who teaches English at Penn State, attempts to cut through the jargonish flackery surrounding the Net to determine its basic virtues and drawbacks. Inspired by Thoreau's Walden, Moore sets out to spend a year in the "electronic woods." He visits the Usenet sector, a collection of "newsgroups," or virtual bulletin boards, where people can post messages on subjects of common interest; observes various MUDs (Multi-User Dungeons), online role-playing games popular with college students; discusses political activism on the Net with a Washington bureaucrat and an Irish dissident; and bashfully dabbles in cyber-sex. Detached and decidedly unscientific, Moore illuminates the chasm between the high claims of the digerati and the misadventures of the novice Net user. His homespun approach and silly quips, however, make this a thin polemic.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Moore (English, Pennsylvania State Univ.) here provides a tour of the Internet for those folks who've somehow managed to avoid buying into the hype of online fulfillment. Although he doesn't launch into an anti-net diatribe a la Clifford Stoll (Silicon Snake Oil, LJ 3/1/95), Moore mischievously lays bare some revered 'net features such as MUSHs (multi-user shared hallucination, a type of role-playing game), digital relationships, and e-mail, and, in a hilarious encounter, he poses as a female and attempts to have cybersex. Still, Moore-whose given name is indeed Dinty-has some good things to say about virtual communities; it's just that-aside from anonymity, convenience, and the sheer number of people who make up these communities-they're not a whole lot different than what's outside our front doors. This well-written, humorous primer should find a comfortable home in most public libraries.
Mark Annichiarico, "Library Journal"
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Dinty W. Moore was born and raised in Erie, Pennsylvania, and spent his formative years fishing for bluegill, riding a bike with a banana seat, and dodging the Sisters of St. Joseph. He earned a BA in writing from the University of Pittsburgh, worked briefly as a journalist, and also served short stints as a documentary filmmaker, modern dance performer, zookeeper, and Greenwich Village waiter. It was only after failing at each of these professions that he went on to earn an MFA in fiction writing from Louisiana State University.

A National Endowment for the Arts fellowship recipient, Moore has guest taught creative nonfiction seminars across the United States and in Europe. In addition to editing the internet journal, Brevity, he is on the editorial board of Creative Nonfiction magazine.

Moore teaches writing at Ohio University.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The author captured an intelligent snapshot of internet culture and community as it began to take hold in the mid to late 1990s. A fun, easy read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By MovieMusic on February 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The author has a nice, relaxed writing style but the book now has about as much value as someone writing a guidebook to black and white TV. And for younger readers, yes, TV really was once black and white.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 1995
Format: Hardcover
From Library Journal: Moore mischeviously lays bare some revered 'net features
such as MUSHS, digital relationships, and e-mail, and, in a hilarious encounter
he poses as a female and attempts to have cybersex. Still Moore has some good
things to say about virtual communities. This (is a) well-written,
humorous primer.
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