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The Empire of "The City": The Secret History of British Financial Power Paperback – August 2, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Book Tree (August 2, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585092622
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585092628
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #718,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Michael Tozer on November 19, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having just finished reading "The Empire of the City", I must express my surprise. It was not at all what I had thought it would be. Given the title, I had expected a representation relative to the rise of the Bank of England and its relationship to what New World Order propagandist Walter Russell Mead has styled as "Dutch Finance". Although this subject is addressed, the book is mostly about power politics as practiced by the Anglo-American elite from 1815 until the end of World War II.

Knuth's presentation is excellent, well documented, and terribly interesting. He avers quite rightly that there is an Anglo-American elite, which has controlled the foreign policy of both the United Kingdom and the United States in the historical period under consideration. This is very important material that ought to be well absorbed by all serious students of history.

We strongly recommend this very important little book. Read it. And consider it will. With this, we can all begin to know justice and to love mercy, while yet there is time.
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32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Wisconsin Dell on March 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
The Empire of "The City" is a great title that fails to deliver the goods. The book was written in the 1940's and, I am guessing, was bold and edgy in its day. The book encircles " The City" without penetrating its borders. Not a great indictment of the author or book considering the subject. The book, read pamphlet, does focus on some significant European and American history (1850 to 1925) that is worth the price. The book maybe viewed as foundation material. One flaw of this and similar books is to paint the European bankers as mistake free and monolithic. When in fact there are considerable internal conflicts that can result in serious competition. It must be the only way to keep sharp! The Creature from Jekyll Island by Griffin, while it suffers from an unneeded political ideology dialogue, is a more complete account.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cellaich on October 4, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can't argue with the other reviewers. This is one of those short and potent little books on a big subject. I thank the other reviewer for Griffins Jekle-Hyde recommendation. I've have a slew of leads from this book that take me further on. Now I just have to read "The Prince" by Niccolo Machiavelli. What lead me to this book in the first place was my study of cycles. I think this book is extremely timeless as it appears to be written yesterday given the current political/banking picture (10/2008).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Montz on December 22, 2013
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"The Empire of the City: The Secret History of British Financial Power" by E.C. Knuth is a short book of approximately 105 pages which examines the geopolitics of the British Empire and how the British Empire dealt with rival states by employing a "divide and conquer" approach. The book is mainly focused on the period of late 19th century and first four decades of the 20th century. The book was written in the 1940's, but is still relevant today. I found that the book supplements other historical works on the period by providing a different prospective on major events such as World War One. The book offers what feels like inside information or behind the scenes view of the great game of geopolitics of the time.

Knuth touches upon the "Pilgrim Society" a little known cabal that was created to foster Anglo-American interest. A quick look at the member list of the Pilgrims and it is clear to see that this group is full of high ranking power brokers. In addition to the Pilgrim Society, Knuth also discusses the Rhodes - Milner Round table group. Carroll Quigley discusses this group in detail in his classic books "Tragedy and Hope" and "The Anglo American Establishment". References to the machinations of these groups is what I mean about "behind the scene" prospective. In the standard view of history you won't hear about the influence of these power brokers. These groups were formed to influence Anglo-American relations. It was Rhodes hope to build an Alliance of the English speaking nations for World Domination.

Knuth points out that the "City" is a sovereign state not subject to the laws of Great Britain. The City of London is similar to the Vatican in Rome or the District of Columbia in the united states of America in this regard.
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