The Empire Strikes Out and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $8.12 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Empire Strikes Out: How Baseball Sold U.S. Foreign Policy and Promoted the American Way Abroad Hardcover – February 9, 2010


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, February 9, 2010
$19.83
$1.85 $0.50


Frequently Bought Together

The Empire Strikes Out: How Baseball Sold U.S. Foreign Policy and Promoted the American Way Abroad + Welcome to the Terrordome: The Pain, Politics and Promise of Sports
Price for both: $26.23

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: New Press, The (February 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595581952
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595581952
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #879,270 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

''Good stories and nimble prose along with original research. . . and shrewd analysis and appropriate historical revision -- this book hits it out of the park.'' -- Morning News

''An intriguing look at the game of politics and diamond diplomacy. . . The wealth of neat gems [in The Empire Strikes Out] provide a fresh perspective from many unique angles.'' -- Sporting News

''Elias has written both fiction and nonfiction about baseball and his love for the game shines through. But he also doesn't hold back (or maybe steps up to the plate?), indicting America's pastime for aligning itself with political conservatives and the military, and becoming a tool for globalization. He tells a compelling story made more vivid by thorough research and authoritative writing.'' --Associated Press

''Lively and provocative, this is the 'big picture' look at the entangled, and sometimes nefarious, relationship between our national pastime and U.S. foreign policy. Well crafted, it is, at once, nuanced, imaginative, and provocative. Robert Elias provides a riveting account of how our national pastime has been part and parcel of American diplomacy, militarism, and globalization. This is the definitive account of how baseball has been used to sell and export the American dream.'' -- George Gmelch, author of Baseball without Borders

''The Empire Strikes Out is a rare and wonderful combination of splendid scholarship and lively writing. Robert Elias' affection for baseball illuminates its pages, even when he is unearthing episodes of organized baseball's racism, jingoism, unbridled militarism, and insensitivity to other cultures. Simultaneously, and gracefully, the book describes the development of baseball and its impact overseas as a sort of quasi instrument of American foreign policy. . . . A truly fine work. Highly recommended.'' -- Roger Kahn, author of The Boys of Summer

''Sports have always been ripe for exploitation by those who would pump the politics of militarism through play. No one has ever broken down the history of this process in baseball like Robert Elias. The Empire Strikes Out should be required reading for anyone who considers themselves a baseball fan, or for anyone who has questioned the military misadventures of the past decade. It is an unqualified triumph.'' --Dave Zirin, author of A People's History of Sports in the United States

''The Empire Strikes Out is, without question, a masterful piece of research and writing. Elias has been able to bring first rate insight and analysis into an area -- baseball and foreign policy -- that has never really been adequately covered. I was equally impressed by the quality and depth of research. . . Baseball history has a new mentor.'' -- George McGlynn, author of Dynamics of Fitness, Cross Training for Sports

''Refreshing stuff. . . exceptionally ambitious.'' -- Bill Littlefield, host of Only a Game, WBUR Public Radio, Boston

''The Empire Strikes Out isn't your typical baseball history, chock full of stats and charming anecdotes about baseball's greats, although it does have some of both. But Robert Elias' mission in writing it is to show American foreign policy's effect on baseball and the reverse as well.'' --History Wire --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Mixing sharp political analysis and compelling lore, an eye-opening look at baseball's relationship to American empire, from the revolutionary era to the present

Advance praise:
The Empire Strikes Out is a rare and wonderful combination of splendid scholarship and lively writing. Robert Elias' affection for baseball illuminates its pages, even when he is unearthing episodes of organized baseball's racism, jingoism, unbridled militarism and insensitivity to other cultures. Simultaneously, and gracefully, the book describes the development of baseball and its impact overseas as a sort of quasi instrument of American foreign policy.
The recent internationalization of major-league rosters makes the book particularly timely. A truly fine work. Highly recommended.
- Roger Kahn, author of The Boys of Summer, The Era, Memories of Summer, October Men, Joe and Marilyn, etc.

Lively and provocative, this is the "big picture" look at the entangled, and sometimes nefarious, relationship between our national pastime and American diplomacy, militarism, and globalization. Well crafted, it is, at once, nuanced, imaginative, and provocative. Robert Elias' provides a riveting account of how our national pastime has been part and parcel of American diplomacy, militarism, and globalization.This is the definitive account of how baseball has been used to sell and export the American dream.
- George Gmelch, author of Baseball Without Borders, Inside Pitch, In the Ballpark, etc.


More About the Author

Robert Elias is Professor of Politics and Chair of Legal Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he has received the Sarlo Prize, the Distinguished Research Award, and Frank Beach Service Award, and been a Davies Professor and the National Endowment for the Humanities Chair. He teaches courses on U.S. political history, human rights, constitutional law, American foreign policy, and baseball. Elias was educated at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A.), Penn State University (M.A., PhD), and the University of Strasbourg (Certificate). He is the author of eight books, and numerous essays and articles in both popular and academic periodicals. He's the Editor in Chief of Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice. He's received numerous honors, including a Fulbright Award and two MacArthur Grants. He's taught at the University of California--Berkeley, Tufts University, the University of Maryland, and Penn State University. He's been a researcher at the Institute for Defense & Disarmament Studies (Boston), Oxfam America (Boston), the Vera Institute of Justice (New York), the Graduate Institute of International Studies (Geneva), and the International Institute of Human Rights (Strasbourg). He lives in Mill Valley, California.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Lagreid on March 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Before we dive into this book, in the interest of full disclosure I feel I should inform you that I was a student of Robert Elias while at the University of San Francisco, where I took his class "The American Dream and the American Pastime: Baseball as a Cultural Mirror of America." It was one of my favorite classes while at USF and he remains a good friend to this day, yet as friends can and should do, they provide objective reviews of each other and their work. Is it a bit weird to be reviewing a former professor's book? Yes - but then again, my classmates and I reviewed his work while in school, so it's not that foreign of a concept. This time it just goes on the internet for everyone to see as opposed to the Scantron form that went in the manila envelope at the end of the semester and was sent to the dean's office or our thoughts on his class discussions that we bantered about over coffee in the cafeteria as we struggled to write papers or watch all of Ken Burns' Baseball documentary. Moving on...

To say that baseball is intertwined with America would be an amazing injustice - and in many more ways and at many deeper levels than you might think. In his latest book, The Empire Strikes Out, Robert Elias shows how baseball transformed from a simple game into a tool of spreading American idealism not only throughout the world but domestically as well.

Elias begins his introductory chapter with a quote from the French Algerian philosopher Albert Camus, stating "The true patriot is one who gives his highest loyalty not to his country as it is, but to what it can and ought to be.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. Pupini on March 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The research that went into this book is evident in the detailed explication of its central thesis - that baseball is and has been an international ambassador for the United States, sometimes for good and sometimes not so good. It is densely packed with examples of both. It is a book for fans of baseball and for students of public policy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Best Of All on January 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Yes, that is Uncle Sam swinging from the heels on the front of the dust jacket for The Empire Strikes Out: How Baseball Sold U.S. Foreign Policy and Promoted the American Way Abroad (February 2010, The News Press). Historian Robert Elias packs the thick 294 pages of text, 16 pages of photographs and nearly 100 pages of notes with an intriguing look at the game of politics and diamond diplomacy.

"Baseball was played in America as far back as the Revolutionary War and was first designated as the `national pastime' in the 1850s. Since then, the sport has worked hard to maintain that status," writes Elias. "It has also sought to equate itself with American masculinity and patriotism, and with U.S. military endeavors in particular.

"When the United States began projecting itself as a global power in the late nineteenth century, baseball was enlisted in America's imperial quests - helping the nation colonize other lands, from the Caribbean to Asia to the Pacific. The game was regularly part of the U.S. `civilizing missions' launched abroad, either militarily or economically, and sometimes bolstered by the forces of `muscular Christianity.'"

The wealth of neat gems provide a fresh perspective from many unique angles. Thomas Jefferson was not impressed with the game, but Abraham Lincoln's enjoyment as a player and spectator may have saved baseball from an even sharper decline during the Civil War.

"The National Association of Base Ball Players cut short its 1861 season and ball playing diminished generally. Baseball's fortunes revived, however, with stories of Abraham Lincoln's devotion to the game," Elias writes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By W. B. Gray on September 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book is really irritating. There's not as much new information as you'd hope, if you've ever seen Ken Burns' "Baseball" documentary. It doesn't seem to be written with an understanding of the game.

Beyond that, the negativity is continual and eventually drove me to put the book down in disgust.

The author's premise is essentially that baseball has collaborated with the US military to do evil, over and over and over. I'm not a flag-waving Tea Party guy; in fact I'm a Democrat. Nor am I unaware of some of the US' foreign policy arrogance, particularly around the turn of the 20th and 21st centuries.

But this book is just a downbeat, repetitious recitation of evils written by somebody who hates the US and hates MLB. It's not at all concise. How many times do we have to be lectured to about MLB exploiting black players, or Central Americans, or whoever? Dozens and dozens, according to this guy.

Often the US-hating author goes off on tangents far from baseball. Look, I hated George W. Bush and his war on Iraq too. But it had very little connection to baseball -- we had to put up with God Bless America in the 7th inning -- and should have merited a page at most. Instead he just drones on and on.

If that sounds like a good time to you, to each their own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?