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The End of All Things to Come Explicit Lyrics

279 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Explicit Lyrics, November 19, 2002
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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Silenced 3:00$0.99  Buy MP3 
  2. Trapped In The Wake Of A Dream 4:41$0.99  Buy MP3 
  3. Not Falling 4:03$0.99  Buy MP3 
  4. (Per)Version Of A truth 4:40$0.99  Buy MP3 
  5. Mercy, Severity 4:54$0.99  Buy MP3 
  6. World So Cold 5:36$0.99  Buy MP3 
  7. the patient mental 4:38$0.99  Buy MP3 
  8. Skrying 5:38$0.99  Buy MP3 
  9. Solve Et Coagula 2:48$0.99  Buy MP3 
10. Shadow Of A Man 3:54$0.99  Buy MP3 
11. 12:97:24:990:11$0.99  Buy MP3 
12. The End Of All Things To Come 3:00$0.99  Buy MP3 
13. A Key To Nothing 5:07$0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 19, 2002)
  • Original Release Date: 2000
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: Epic
  • ASIN: B0000787EO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (279 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,532 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Wheelchair Assassin on March 18, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I've always thought Mudvayne were a somewhat misunderstood and unfairly maligned band. Mainstreamers won't listen to them because they don't sound anything like Pearl Jam or the Dave Matthews band, and metalheads reject them for not sounding enough like Slayer or Morbid Angel (look them up). As somewhat of a musical extremist myself, I do take a certain amount of umbrage to people acting like Mudvayne are the heaviest or craziest band out there, because they're far from it. But of course, not being extreme doesn't necessarily mean something isn't good, just as being extreme doesn't make something good (it certainly helps, though!). I think "The End of All Things to Come," much like its predecessor "LD 50," has a lot to offer for any rock or metal fan who can keep an open mind.
There seems to be a lot of discussion as to how exactly to classify Mudvayne, so I might as well contribute my take. I wouldn't call this stuff metal, at least not in the same sense of the term as, say, Slayer or Iron Maiden. At the same time, I don't see how you could call it nu-metal, since it's nowhere near as simplistic as stuff like Korn or Disturbed. With its complex arrangements and ever-shifting time signatures, I'd say this is more like heavy math rock than anything else. I listen to a lot of progressive music (Rush, Yes, Dream Theater, etc.) in addition to extreme stuff, and while Mudvayne's work certainly isn't the heaviest or most progressive music I've ever heard, it does combine the two elements just enough to make for an interesting listen.
Despite what some may say, I find Mudvayne to be a pretty talented band, certainly moreso than most of the Seattle-lite and homiecore acts polluting the airwaves right now.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By M. Hart on November 26, 2002
Format: Audio CD
On the heals of their very successful previous album "L.D. 50" with its hit song "Dig", Mudvayne has produced an even more powerful heavy/nu-metal album with "The End of All Things to Come". Mudvayne's four members; calling themselves Chüd (vocals), Güüd (guitars & vocals), Spüg (percussion) Rü-d (bass); changed their names from the ones used on the "L.D. 50" album to emphasize their expanded dynamic range and their new alien look for this album. "The End of All Things to Come" clearly illustrates Mudvayne's maturity and improved musicianship over their previous two albums. My ratings for each of the songs (including tracks on the Limited Edition DVD) are below:
CD:
1. "Silenced" 5/5. Heavy & aggressive guitar/percussion with screaming vocals all the way. One of the heaviest songs on the album.
2. "Trapped in the Wake of a Dream" 5/5. Eclectic mix of screaming/melodic vocals backed with aggressive to heavy guitar/percussion; overall a very heavy song.
3. "Not Falling" 5+/5. Very reminiscent to the previous album, "L.D. 50" with its fast percussion & rhythmic guitars mixed with mostly-melodic/screaming vocals.
4. "(Per) Version of Truth" 4/5. Slower song with more melodic vocals, but giving way to more aggressive choruses.
5. "Mercy, Severity" 5/5. A fast & aggressive guitar/percussion beginning giving way to soft & melodic vocals, but quickly going back to very aggressive choruses.
6. "World So Cold" 5+/5. One of the best songs on the album, this song begins as a percussionless, melodic ballad but transforms cleanly into a more aggressive percussion-driven song with a mix of aggressive/melodic vocals & guitar. The beginning ballad is repeated in the song, but with percussion. Very well done guys!
7. "The Patient Mental" 4/5.
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68 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Samhot on August 6, 2003
Format: Audio CD
First off, I have to mention that my tastes in music are pretty varied, but my favorite music leans toward the ambitious, grand, whimsical, ethereal, refined/elegant, complex, original, intelligent, powerful, multi-faceted and in many cases, cerebral. Thus, I find one (to a maximum degree) or more of these qualities exemplified in progressive/psychedelic rock (mainly of the 60s and 70s), and classical music, which are my top preferences in music. As far as metal is concerned, I was never a die-hard fan, and still am not to this day, though my strongest interest in it was a decade ago, and has been nearly nonexistent since, as I found it to become tasteless, predictable and unoriginal.

However, on the discovery of some recent bands who seem to be pushing the envelope of metal (e.g. Meshuggah), I'm a bit more hopeful on the progress of "the hard stuff." Meshuggah plays "math-metal," a style which incorporates rhythmically complex features into metal. When I read that Mudvayne were also "mathematical" in their rhythms, I had to check these guys out -- and I am SO glad that I did. These guys have a LARGE amount of versatility and talent - so much so, that I'm not sure my feelings about the whole thing can be accurately expressed in words. The structures are indeed complex and mathematical, but the band does not shy away from melody and catchy heavy rock. It's a nice balance between accessibility and complexity (not unlike Permanent Waves-era Rush.) The lyrics are intelligent, which are at times serious, thought-provoking, and at other times humorous and/or sarcastic.
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