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The End of All Things: A Defense of the Future Paperback – October 1, 1999


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The End of All Things: A Defense of the Future + When Shall These Things Be?: A Reformed Response to Hyper-Preterism
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Canon Press; First Edition edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885767536
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885767530
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #777,010 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

C. Jonathin Seriaiah received his Master of Divinity from Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, and he currently serves as a pastor in Cherokee Village, Arkansas, where he lives with his wife Catherine and two children Ajha Neri and Ransom Thorne.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 30, 2000
As this book and its author have been pivotal points in my young Christian life, I must ask the reader's indulgence as I start this review on a personal note. I remember my reaction the first time that I heard of the preterist position of eschatology. It went something like this... "Are you completely nuts! " How could the events described in the Olivet Discourse and most of Revelation have happened in the first century? But then again, I was finding it intellectually difficult to make "soon" and "this generation shall not pass away" stretch out into two thousand years plus. So, as I investigated this idea, I soon encountered the large body of work produced by the hyper-preterists (hereinafter pantelists). They argued that not only was the Great Tribulation completely fulfilled in 70AD, if one were to be CONSISTENT then ALL prophecy was fulfilled in 70AD, including the Final Advent of Christ, the resurrection, and the Final Judgment. As good ole Bugs would say, "That's All Folks!" Well, ideas have consequences, and as I struggled with this idea, I went through the blackest moments in my Christian faith and actual clinical depression. I praise God for the Christian compassion of the author who spent a great deal of time with me on this issue many months before this book came out. Now to the meat of the matter. There are so very few works refuting pantelism (this being the only book-length treatment of the subject that I am aware of), and each that I have seen bases its argumentation heavily on the pantelists' departure from the historic Christian creeds. However, the pantelists play the "Sola Scriptura" card to their favor, and as R.C. Sproul, Jr.Read more ›
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth Levi on May 3, 2004
Seriaiah has performed an important service to the evangelical theological world. He has provided a succinct and insightful introduction and critique of an alarming aberrant theology. He calls it "pantelism" ("all things-ism") whereas others call in "Hyper-Preterism" (see espcially Keith Mathison's equally helpful expose, When Shall These Things Be?").
This book provides a well-reasoned critique of several of the leading errors of this new, innovative movement. The Pantelists believe that ALL of biblical prophecy has been fulfilled. That Jesus's Second Coming occurred in AD 70, and that the Last Day and the resurrection all occurred then. The "last day" is in their view "the last day of Israel."
I highly commend this book as an important tool in witnessing to members of this faulty theological movement. There may not be many Pantelists around, but when just one of them shows up, you will know it! They are determined to debate the topic at the drop of a hat. (In this regard see some of the strange reviews by them of Keith Mathison's "When Shall These Things Be?"
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Taylor Adams on May 7, 2007
I once was a pantelist (hyper-preterist). I was committed. I was writing a book on the topic. And then. And then I read Mathison's "When Shall These Things Be." I read it to refute it. I still have my half-finished refutation in my computer. I couldn't make it through three chapters of that book. I was convinced. Hyper-preterism is wrong. Flat out wrong. I threw out my book manuscript. Then I got this book, out of interest. It nailed shut the coffin lid. I was done with pantelism. Forever. I compared what Mathison and Seraiah were saying with the hyper-preterist response. The hyper-preterists were stretching, reaching for answers that were not readily forthcoming. They weren't in the same league.

Seraiah's book is a direct theological response to hyper-preterism, and it does its job well. It has helped a number of my friends escape pantelism as well, and so I am personally thankful for its paraousia.

Occasionally I return to those websites that I used to haunt as a hyper-preterist. So far I have not found one response to this book or to Mathison's, that is anywhere near the same league, in terms of theology and scholarship.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dale H. Robinson on August 10, 2006
It is generally refreshing to read preterist treatments of eschatology, even partial. One normally feels a kinship with those who recognize the imminence of at least some New Testament events. Unfortunately the purpose of this book is not to bind more closely but poison the well.

Seraiah is to commended for maintaining that Revelation 1:7's "every eye will see him" means apostate Israel--"all the tribes of the Land"--as in Jesus' declaration to the Sanhedrin "after this you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of power and coming upon the clouds of heaven." Addressed as it was to them, it meant they--indeed all unbelieving Israel--would recognize Christ's ascension to the Father's throne and "mourn because of Him" who had come to judge them and take away the Kingdom. The connection with Matthew 24:30 is undeniable: "At that time the sign of the Son of Man [who is] in heaven will appear and all the tribes of the Land will mourn." Then He would "gather His elect from the four winds"--the great ingathering of Gentiles now that the New Covenant was in full swing. Daniel 7:13-14's vision of a Son of Man taken into God' Presence and all peoples, etc. worshipping was thereby explained and fulfilled.

Matthew 23-25 pretty well determines one's whole framework for "end times." And it is here that PARTIAL preterists (for that is what Seraiah and his colleagues are) are only PARTIALLY right. Seraiah correctly dismisses attempts to translate "genea" as race or make it some other generation--Mt 23:36 squashes that (context, always context). But they err when they try to position a wedge somewhere after the "time text" ("this generation will not pass away until all these things take place"--verse 34), separating Jerusalem's AD 70 Fall from yet future events.
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